Polearm Tutorial
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Polearm Tutorial

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How to Build a Basic Amtgard Polearm A brief tutorial by Baron Sir Gorin MATERIALS 1 Pool Noodle Pool noodle is very inexpensive and, in the summer season, can be purchased at Fred Meyer and Wal-Mart for less than $2 each. I recommend stocking up in the summer. During the rest of the year it can be purchased at The Toy Quest, but they cost about $5 each. 1 Core (Fiberglass tube) While there are other materials that can be used as the core for an Amtgard weapon, we’re going to be using a fiberglass tube or spar in this tutorial. They are fairly inexpensive, lightweight, flexible and very durable. They can be purchased online at goodwind kites (the specific link is below). I usually recommend an *outer* diameter of .602” or .745”. The smaller diameters (.412” and .505”) work great for swords and short weapons, but are too thin for polearms. http://www.goodwindskites.com/merch/list.shtml?cat=framework.tubularfiberglass Dust mask These are inexpensive and can be purchased at almost any hardware store. They are a must have if you’re going to cut fiberglass. Camp Pad and Open Cell Foam These are the rolls of foam that you place under a sleeping bag while camping. It’s a stiff blue foam with great durability. Wal-mart is the best place to pick up this foam (get the darker blue foam) and usually runs about $5-6 each. Open cell foam can be found at Fred-Meyers and Joann’s Fabrics A ...

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How to Build a
Basic Amtgard Polearm
A brief tutorial by Baron Sir Gorin
MATERIALS
1 Pool Noodle
Pool noodle is very inexpensive and, in the summer season, can be
purchased at Fred Meyer and Wal-Mart for less than $2 each.
I
recommend stocking up in the summer.
During the rest of the year
it can be purchased at The Toy Quest, but they cost about $5 each.
1 Core (Fiberglass tube)
While there are other materials that can be used as the core for an
Amtgard weapon, we’re going to be using a fiberglass tube or spar
in this tutorial.
They are fairly inexpensive, lightweight, flexible
and very durable.
They can be purchased online at goodwind kites
(the specific link is below).
I usually recommend an *outer*
diameter of .602” or .745”.
The smaller diameters (.412” and
.505”) work great for swords and short weapons, but are too thin
for polearms.
http://www.goodwindskites.com/merch/list.shtml?cat=framework.tubularfiberglass
Dust mask
These are inexpensive and can be purchased at almost any
hardware store.
They are a must have if you’re going to cut
fiberglass.
Camp Pad and Open Cell Foam
These are the rolls of foam that you place under a sleeping
bag while camping.
It’s a stiff blue foam with great
durability.
Wal-mart is the best place to pick up this foam
(get the darker blue foam) and usually runs about $5-6
each.
Open cell foam can be found at Fred-Meyers and
Joann’s Fabrics
A great alternative to the Open Cell Foam
is a stress ball (the kind given away as a promotional item).
Fabric for a cover
Choose a light, durable fabric.
Avoid the colors yellow and
red.
Anything else is fine.
I recommend an inexpensive
broadcloth.
A poly/cotton blend will keep it’s color longer.
TAPE
You’ll need a roll of each of the following:
Duct Tape:
I recommend Scotch/3M duct
tape.
It’s a little more expensive but a LOT
easier to work with.
Electrical Tape:
Any brand of inexpensive
vinyl electrical tape will work fine.
Clear Packing Tape:
The kind of tape you
use to tape up boxes.
This tape is incredibly
light.
Hockey / Athletic Tape:
The tape you wrap
a hockey stick with.
This tape is optional,
and can be used to provide a grip for your
polearm.
Hack Saw and Utility Knife
Used for cutting your core, foam and tape.
A standard hacksaw will work just fine, but you’ll
need a retractable utility knife of the design pictured
in order to easily shape the foam as detailed in this
tutorial.
You might also find a pair of scissors
handy.
PART 1 – Preparing the Core
STEP 1
Cut the core down to the desired length with a hack saw.
If you purchased a
fiberglass core from Gorin, feel free to leave it uncut.
Always wear your mask when performing this step!
STEP 2
Wipe your core down with a damp paper towel.
STEP 3
Next, cut or tear some duct tape into 1“ x 2” pieces.
Place these pieces over each end of
the core, put the next pieces down at slightly different angles from the previous pieces.
This will help prevent creating a square tip, which will break your foam down faster.
Continue laying pieces over the end of the core until it fits snugly into the hold in your
pool noodle.
PART 2 – Preparing the Foam
STEP 1
Cut the pool noodle into a piece that is about 1/3 the length of your core and a piece that
is 3” long.
Alternatively, you can use a piece of noodle as short as 12”, however, you
must still cover the top 1/3 of your polearm with padding (pipe insulation).
STEP 2
Taper one end of your pool noodle pieces with a long-bladed utility knife.
Take care
when using the knife.
STEP 3
Trace 3 circles onto your camp pad using the end of your pool noodle.
Cut out the circles
and set them aside.
Cut out two small circles that will fit snugly inside your pool noodle
and set them aside.
STEP 4
Cut a circle the same size as in STEP 3 out of your Open Cell Foam.
If using a stress
ball, cut it in half along the seam.
PART 3 – Assembling the pole arm
STEP 1
Slide the long piece of pool noodle over the core.
Place the small piece of camp pad into
the end of the pool noodle.
Place a small piece of duct tape over the end of the pool
noodle.
STEP 2
Take two pieces of duct tape 8” long and cut them in half long-ways so that you’ve got 4
pieces that are 8 inches long and 1 inch wide.
Place one of your camp pad circles on the
top of your polearm and use two of your duct tape strips to affix it to the end of the
polearm.
Repeat with another circle.
This will form the tip of your weapon.
PART 3 – Assembling the polearm
(CONTINUED)
STEP 3
Using two more pieces of 8” x 1” tape, affix the stress ball or open-cell foam onto the tip
of your polearm.
Make sure that you do not compress the foam when taping it to the
polearm.
STEP 4
Place a piece of duct tape around the tip of your polearm so that it covers the edges of
your circles, open cell foam and overlaps onto the pool noodle.
STEP 4
Cover the entire pool noodle in packing tape by laying tape down the length of the pool
noodle leaving no gaps in the tape.
STEP 5
Start wrapping electrical tape down around the noodle starting just above the taper.
Using firm and even pressure to create tension as your continue wrapping the tape down
the taper of the blade.
Continue wrapping the tape down onto the core.
STEP 6
Repeat Steps 1 through 5 with the small piece of pool noodle and the other end of the
core to create a pommel.
You’ll only use 1 foam circle on the pommel as opposed to the
2 you used on the tip.
STEP 7
If you’d like, you can add athletic tape to the core of your pole arm to provide grip,
though it isn’t necessary.
Your polearm is basically complete, now all you have to do is cover it!
PART 4 – Creating a cover
STEP 1
Cut out a piece of fabric that is 10” wide x (Length of your Funnoodle +6 inches) Long.
STEP 2
Fold the fabric over and stitch a single line along it’s edge leaving a ¼” seam allowance.
STEP 3
Close each end by stitching curves on them as shown below
STEP 4
Cut the fabric so that you create a piece long enough for the blade and the pommel.
Then
turn the fabric right-side out.
STEP 5
Slide the cover over the blade and pommel and use electrical tape to secure it to the
polearm.
Congratulations, you’ve successfully
built a basic polearm!!
If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at
gorin@astralwinds.net