28 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Political parties on Web 2.0: The Norwegian Case*

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
28 Pages
English

Description

Political parties on Web 2.0: The Norwegian Case*

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Reads 81
Language English

Exrait

Political parties on Web 2.0: The Norwegian Case* 
 Paper for the 5th ECPR General Conference,  Potsdam , 1012 September 2009  AUTHOR: Øyvind Kalnes, Lillehammer University College, Norway.  Email: dnk.yoivl.nos@hialne Homepage: http://ansatt.hil.no/oyvindk  KEYWORDS Norway, parties, ampaigning,c Web 2.0  *NOTE: The title has been changed from From Alphato Beta testing. Web 2.0 in the Norwegian 2007 and 2009 Campaigns to avoid confusion with earlier papers and articles.
 
1
Abstract This paper analyses how Norwegian political parties have handled the appearance of Web 2.0. It focuses on the campaign for the local elections in September 2007 and the developments up to the forthcoming Parliamentary elections two years later.  By 2005 most parties had learned to use their Web sites as instruments for professional political marketing. In this process of streamlining party presence on the Web acquired the characteristics of what now is conceptualized as Web 1.0. But in 2007 Facebook became the most popular website in Norway, with YouTube rising to number three. The political parties appeared bewildered by the Web 2.0 phenomenon, indicating a similar stage at which they were ten years earlier with Web 1.0.   All seven parliamentary parties and four smaller parties outside parliament are included in the analysis. The data consists of samples of party activity on Facebook, YouTube and politicians' blogs, as well as an overview of other types of Web 2.0 activity. The data samples have been taken at regular intervals since spring 2007, up to and including spring 2009. Hence, data from the campaign for the Parliamentary elections in September 2009 is somewhat limited in this paper. Furthermore, interviews with all party web managers were conducted in 2007 and will be supplied with new interviews after the campaign.  The data is discussed on the background of an eruption hypothesis versus a Web 1.5  hypothesis. While the first hypothesis expects Web 2.0 to have at least potential for making changes in both internal party structure and party system structure, the latter hypothesis expects con,ytiunit rather than change. The central topics are whether the emergence of Web 2.0, with its potential for grassroots participation and networking, as well as multilateral interactivity, was a catalyst of eruptive change towards greater pluralism in the party system or more grassroots participation. The data so far indicate that in terms of party mpetconitio Web 2.0 has had at best a weak ilargnizlup effect, as party ilytvisibi on Web 2.0 roughly reflects party share of votes. While Web 2.0 temporarily appeared to have enhanced participatory democracy in the sense of lowering the threshold for involvement of party grassroots and sympathizers, data from 2009 indicates that the party organizations now are in the process of getting more control.