US-UK citizens cautioned News of  Bin Laden's death taken with a ...
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US-UK citizens cautioned News of Bin Laden's death taken with a ...

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Published by
Reads 27
Language English
Email: gdnnews@batelco.com.bh
gdn1@batelco.com.bh
Gulf Daily News
Tuesday, 3rd May 2011
3
A BAHRAIN-based fam-
ily yesterday joined thou-
sands of people world-
wide in celebrating the
death of Al Qaeda leader
Osama bin Laden.
Rasila Savani’s brother-
in-law
Hasmukh
Parmar
was among more than 3,000
people killed in the terror
attack on the World Trade
Centre in US on September
11, 2001.
She said his wife Bharti
and the couple’s sons, then
aged 16 and 14, were still
trying
to
come to terms
with
their
loss,
nearly
10 years after
the tragedy.
“My sister,
Bharti
and
her elder son,
Shamir broke
the
news
to
me that shat-
tered our fam-
ily,” said Ms Savani.
“Those were testing times
for the family.
“But the news of Bin
Laden’s death has mentally
lifted us all and it’s a good
end as my nephews suffered
for years after the shocking
incident.”
By SANDEEP SINGH GREWAL
Bahrain family
celebrating...
BAHRAIN could cash in on the death
of Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden,
according to a leading banker.
He said the announcement would
“liven up” the depressed US econ-
omy and in turn benefit countries
pegged to the dollar.
The official, who heads opera-
tions at a multinational bank based
in Bahrain, said Bin Laden’s death
was good news for the American
economy, which had been in the dol-
drums for some time.
“With this piece of news coming
in, it is the perfect opportunity for
the dollar to look up and the coun-
try’s economy to enliven at the same
time,” said the banker, who declined
to be named.
“This is also very good news for
dollar-pegged
currencies
like
the
Bahraini dinar, which would also see
good times ahead.”
The banker was speaking as the
dollar rose from a three-year low, oil
fell and world stocks showed gains.
European shares increased a third
of a per cent, while US and Japanese
stocks also rose following the news
of Bin Laden’s death.
“The timing is just perfect,” he
said.
“The US economy is in a bad
shape, the dollar is at its worst and
popularity ratings of the US presi-
dent at an all-time low this news is
good news for everyone and will be
welcomed by the world as a whole,
particularly the finance and banking
industry.”
The banker said the political situa-
tion in the Middle East has also been
and continued to be fluid.
“With the killing of Osama, this
is also a signal to the Hezbollah and
Al Qaeda operatives in the region,
who continue to cause severe dis-
ruptions, to be on their guard,” he
said.
“Never mind the lots of connota-
tions that are being drawn from the
announcement, it certainly is some-
thing to heartily welcome.”
Bahrain
Association
of
Banks
(BAB) chief executive Robert Ainey
said the rise of the dollar, which had
been a safe haven for many years,
would bring a lot of confidence back
to the US economy.
“The stock markets have been
doing fairly well in the last six
months but have been very restrained
as well,” he said.
“However, this development is an
indicator it will continue to do well.
“This surely is a development
that will signal the return of opti-
mism.”
Mr Ainey, an American, how-
ever, said the optimism was still not
across the board as several sectors,
particularly housing, had a long way
to go.
Kingdom ‘could cash in on killing of terrorist chief’
n
Mr Parmar
Mr Parmar lived in Warren,
New Jersey and worked as a
computer
systems
manager
at Cantor Fitzgerald on the
103rd floor of the World Trade
Centre. He was a Green Card
holder with a British passport.
Popularly known as Hash
among friends, he was famous
as a loving husband and father.
Ms Savani said Rishi was
only 14 when he lost his father
and the tragedy led to him suf-
fering from depression.
But yesterday, she said he
phoned her and spoke of his
happiness as news broke of Bin
Laden’s death in a compound
in Pakistan.
“He spoke with me after a
long time and was happy like
the rest of the family,” said Ms
Savani.
“As a child he could not
overcome the situation as his
father dropped him to school
and then went to work.”
According to Mr Parmar’s
profile published in the
New
York Times
on October 21,
2001,
he
was
a
basketball
coach to Rishi and taught his
eldest son Shamir to play the
guitar daily, amusing him with
songs of Jimi Hendrix and
Carlos Santana.
“Rishi used to feel depressed
whenever
September
approached as he missed his
father,” said Ms Savani.
“He was happy when he
called me and it is good to hear
from him.”
The death of the world’s
most-wanted man came just
months before the 10th anni-
versary of the September 11
attacks on the World Trade
Centre and Pentagon, orches-
trated by Bin Laden’s Al Qaeda
organisation.
US
President
Barack
Obama said a small team of
Americans killed Bin Laden
early on Sunday in the town
of Abbottabat, about 100km
(62 miles) north of the capital
Islamabad.
The US State Department
later issued a worldwide secu-
rity
alert
shortly
after
the
announcement of the terrorist
mastermind’s death in a mili-
tary operation.
There
was
no
official
announcement
by
Bahrain
authorities stating whether they
had raised the security level
following Bin Laden’s death.
In
2009,
Bahrain
police
arrested at least three men with
alleged links with Al Qaeda or
an affiliated organisation.
Authorities
seized
two
machine
guns,
a
pistol,
bul-
lets, knives
and
swords
from
the suspects. Interior Minister
Lieutanant
General
Shaikh
Rashid bin Abdulla Al Khalifa
said the cell members were plan-
ning terror acts in Bahrain and
other neighbouring countries.
sandy@gdn.com.bh
US-UK citizens cautioned
By MANDEEP SINGH
News of Bin Laden’s death taken with a pinch of salt
THERE was scepticism amongst
Bahrain residents yesterday after
news broke out that Osama bin
Laden had been killed by US troops.
The general consensus was that
the story had been made up to suit
certain agendas.
“It is totally false,” said a 39-year-
old
Bahraini
businessman
who
wanted to be known only as Adel.
“I don’t believe that he is dead
because if they wanted to take him,
they would have done so a long
time ago.
“If news reports saying that US
forces have known where he was
since last August are true, then why
didn’t they take him out then?”
“I believe it is fake news that has
been made up so we concentrate on
other things.”
British resident Stephanie Green
said the recent dubious reporting of
Bahrain’s unrest meant she had lost
faith in the media.
“Due to recent events and mixed-
up reporting, it is hard to believe the
news right now,” said the 24-year-
old personal assistant.
“With Bin Laden, people thought
he had died years ago.
“For it to be untrue wouldn’t be
that shocking.”
Also sceptical was Briton Jack
Taylor.
“One thought that I just couldn’t
shrug off was how Barack Obama
and
his
counterparts
such
as
Hillary
Clinton
could
condemn
the Bahrain government on how
they handled the recent situation in
Bahrain while they have gone out
and killed a man and celebrated
it to international media,” said the
20-year-old.
“But then I thought, is he really
By ALICIA DE HALDEVANG
dead?
“It’s the 21st century and
we haven’t seen a picture
yet.
“Troops are notoriously
known for taking pictures of
people they have attacked
or killed and yet we haven’t
seen anything.”
The magazine editor said
if reports were true it would
likely have a positive affect
on the world and Middle
East.
However,
salesman
Benson Samuel, 23, disa-
greed.
“I just saw the news on
Facebook and I feel odd
about it,” he said.
“Iraq and Afghanistan are
in such bad condition at the
moment, I don’t think this
news will have a positive
effect on the world, or on
the Middle East.
Bahraini
Noor
Ahmed
said she did not believe the
terrorist leader was dead
because of the nature of the
US military operation.
“They should have done
everything in their power
to capture him alive so he
would stand trial before the
world for crimes he com-
mitted
against
the
West,
Muslims
and
humanity,”
said the 23-year-old public
relations officer.
“Also, why bury him in
the sea?”
Others said they would
remain doubtful until evi-
dence of Bin Laden’s death
was shown.
“Most people believe that
he died around six years
ago and rumours have been
floating around since then
that he was killed or he died
of cancer,” said sales engi-
neer Bhusha Damle, 26.
“Unless they show clear
photographs of his face and
body, then I won’t believe
anything they say.”
His view was echoed by
Jahangwi Khan.
“I really believe that the
USA has fixed this news
for their convenience,” said
the information technology
administrator, 34.
n
Mr Samuel
n
Mr Taylor
AMERICAN and British citizens have been
urged to be on high alert, amid fears of pos-
sible retaliatory attacks following the death of
Osama bin Laden.
Both countries said they were stepping up
security at their embassies and warned of the
possibility
of
revenge
attacks
against
their
nationals.
The US Embassy in Bahrain warned its
citizens of potential anti-American violence in
a statement posted on its website yesterday,
a warning it said would remain in place until
August 1.
“Given the uncertainty and volatility of the
current situation, US citizens in areas where
recent events could cause anti-American vio-
lence are strongly urged to limit their travel
outside of their homes and hotels and avoid
mass gatherings and demonstrations,” it said.
It
also
said
US
government
facilities
worldwide would remain at a heightened
state of alert and urged its citizens to
enrol in the US State Department’s Smart
Traveller Enrolment Programme to receive
updated information on travel and security
issues.
Meanwhile,
the
British
Foreign
Office
warned Bin Laden’s death “may lead to an
increase in violence and terrorist activity”.
“The Foreign Secretary has asked all our
embassies and high commissions overseas to
review their security,” said a message posted
on the British Embassy’s website.
“We advise British nationals overseas to
monitor the media carefully for local reac-
tions, remain vigilant, exercise caution in all
public places and avoid demonstrations, large
crowds of people and public events.”
World on alert – Page 15