Bringing Scalability to Stem Cell Research

Bringing Scalability to Stem Cell Research

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http://apexbiologix.com/ - Scalability is for network infrastructure and hardware, right? Not necessarily. Apparently, scalability is also something researchers in the field of platelet-rich plasma and stem cell therapies are interested in.

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Published 24 April 2017
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Bringing Scalability to Stem Cell Research Scalability is for network infrastructure and hardware, right? Not necessarily. Apparently, scalability is also something researchers in the field of platelet-rich plasma and stem cell therapies are interested in. One particular researcher recently sent a sample of stem cells into outer space to see if a zero-gravity environment would make it possible to grow the cells more quickly.
According to the Post Bulletin, Dr. Abba Zubair of the Mayo Clinic was able to prepare a sample of stem cells that was included as part of a science package being delivered to the International Space Station back in February. The stem cells in question were taken from bone marrow. Dr. Zubair is hoping to learn a lot more about them as he pursues using stem cell therapy to treat brain injuries resulting from stroke. Apex Biologix, a Utah-based company that trains doctors to use stem cell and platelet-rich plasma therapies in a variety of procedures, confirms the importance of Zubair's research. If the research proves there is a way to grow stem cells in space more quickly and reliably than we can here on Earth, it could change the way we look at patient-donated stem cells for regenerative medicine. Growing Them Faster Dr. Zubair's research is based on the existing knowledge that stem cells can reduce inflammation. His lab has already shown that injecting stem cells into the site of a stroke can reduce inflammation enough to make a difference. The stem cells also secrete growth factors important for neuron and blood vessel regeneration. Despite having every reason to believe that stem cell therapy can be used to treat stroke-related brain damage, Zubair says that there are limits to the therapy due to the fact that stem cells, by their nature, minimize their own reproduction. Current evidence suggests that somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 million stem cells are required to create an effective dose for treating stroke-related brain injuries. Growing that many, quickly enough, is just not possible at this
timeat least not in a way that would be cost-effective and reliable. Zubair is hoping things are different in space. Zubair is hopeful that stem cell therapy is scalable in a zero-gravity environment of space. Simulations suggest that cells will grow and divide more rapidly in space, thus Zubair's desire to get stem cell material onto the space station. With a live video connection and the help of space station crew, Zubair will be able to run some very simple experiments that will either prove or disprove his theory. The Potential for Scalability Proponents of stem cell therapy are excited about the possibilities of Zubair's research. They cannot over-emphasize the potential of scalability not only for current treatments but also for researching future treatments. With both platelet-rich plasma and stem cells, volume is key to efficacy. The faster stem cells can be encouraged to divide, the more quickly larger volumes of material can be produced in order to create larger doses. Apex Biologix says that both stem cell and platelet-rich plasma injections are proving effective for patients looking to manage chronic pain or recover more quickly from various injuries. The company's PRP and stem cell training courses have already helped hundreds of clinics around the U.S. get started offering the therapies to patients. Scalability is not just for network infrastructure and hardware. It is also applicable to one of the most exciting areas of medicine right now. If scalability is proved possible, it could open the door to a lot more research and more potential applications.