Crime & Disorder & Drugs Audit 2004 - Prolific & Priority Offenders
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Crime & Disorder & Drugs Audit 2004 - Prolific & Priority Offenders

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10 Pages
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Broadland Crime and Disorderand Drugs Audit 2004Prolific & Priority Offendersxxxxxxx 1. Offenders living in Broadland1.1 Prolific and Priority Offender StrategyThe Prolific and Priority Offender (PPO) Strategy comprises three complementary strands:Catch and Convict, Rehabilitate and Resettle, and Prevent and Deter: ict - actively tackling those who are already prolific offenders. Rehabilitate and Resettle – working with identified prolific offenders to stop theiroffending by offering a range of supportive interventions. Offenders will be offered theopportunity for rehabilitation or face a very swift return to the courts. Prevent and Deter – to stop people (overwhelmingly young people) engaging inoffending behaviours and graduating into prolific offenders.Together these will combine to form a comprehensive, locally delivered programme toreduce the number of prolific and other priority offenders, who offend most or otherwisecause most harm to their communities.CDRPs have lead responsibility for delivering all three strands of the strategy, inconjunction with Local Criminal Justice Boards who have responsibility for setting theoverall framework for the area. The emphasis will be on a multi-agency approach towards tackling the problem. Police,Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Prisons and Probation will work together with the LocalCriminal Justice Board (LCJB) to effectively catch, convict, monitor and manage a keytarget group of offenders in the ...

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Broadland Crime and Disorder
and Drugs Audit 2004
Prolific & Priority Offenders 1. Offenders living in Broadland
1.1 Prolific and Priority Offender Strategy
The Prolific and Priority Offender (PPO) Strategy comprises three complementary strands:
Catch and Convict, Rehabilitate and Resettle, and Prevent and Deter: ict - actively tackling those who are already prolific offenders.
Rehabilitate and Resettle – working with identified prolific offenders to stop their
offending by offering a range of supportive interventions. Offenders will be offered the
opportunity for rehabilitation or face a very swift return to the courts.
Prevent and Deter – to stop people (overwhelmingly young people) engaging in
offending behaviours and graduating into prolific offenders.
Together these will combine to form a comprehensive, locally delivered programme to
reduce the number of prolific and other priority offenders, who offend most or otherwise
cause most harm to their communities.
CDRPs have lead responsibility for delivering all three strands of the strategy, in
conjunction with Local Criminal Justice Boards who have responsibility for setting the
overall framework for the area.
The emphasis will be on a multi-agency approach towards tackling the problem. Police,
Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Prisons and Probation will work together with the Local
Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) to effectively catch, convict, monitor and manage a key
target group of offenders in the community or custody and work towards rehabilitating
them.
The implementation of the Catch and Convict and the Rehabilitate and Resettle strand
was started in September 2004. Prevent and Deter will be implemented from February
2005.
Further work will be required over the coming year to ensure that some of the details are
worked through all the strands and that, in particular, a more comprehensive range of
community organisations are brought together to ensure the delivery of the Prevent and
Deter and the Rehabilitate and Re-settle Strands.
The aims of the schemes are to:
Enhance arrest, investigation, detection, charging and prosecution of offenders,
bringing to justice as much of the criminality committed by the targeted PPOs as
possible;
Reduce re-offending of PPOs, and consequently reduce the number of victims of
crime;
Develop a rapid and effective partnership intervention which enables effective
supervision and monitoring of PPOs;
Address non-compliance/ re-offending speedily and effectively.
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 2
xxxxxxxIn focusing activities on the ‘major prolific offenders’ responsible for a disproportionate
amount of crime across Norfolk, PPOs will deliver:
More efficient use of partnership resources to enhance the delivery of justice.
A greater impact on crime reduction and the delivery of Community Safety and Public
Service Agreement (PSA) targets.
An improvement in public confidence in the Criminal Justice Service (CJS) and a
reduction in the fear of crime.
In line with the aim of impacting upon both local priorities and PSA targets the PPO
strategy will contribute to reductions in:
Vehicle crime.
Domestic burglary.
Violent Crime (including domestic violence).
Drug related crime.
Anti-social behaviour and criminal damage.
It will further complement delivery of targets to:
Improve the level of confidence of the public in the Criminal Justice System.
Protect the public.
Improve the delivery of justice by increasing the number of crimes for which an
offender is brought to justice.
Each of the schemes that have been developed has been based upon the geographical
boundaries of Police Basic Command Units (BCU) to optimise the use of resources i.e.:
Western BCU (Kings Lynn, West Norfolk and Breckland)
Eastern (Broadland, Great Yarmouth and North Norfolk)
Central (Norwich, Broadland and South Norfolk).
Use of this geographical base will enable an effective strategic approach to join the three
strands of the strategy and reduce the potential for duplication and poor communication.
Broadland CDRP covers two BCU areas and has agreed to participate in the two area
schemes of Eastern and Central.
All stakeholders in the CDRP are responsible for ensuring that all strands of the strategy
are delivered in accordance with local and national policies and procedures in relation to
diversity promotion and management. They are also responsible for overseeing and where
appropriate developing all necessary monitoring and reporting processes to ensure
compliance with equalities and related legislation.
The three BCU Schemes will work in liaison to ensure that there are protocols in place with
respect to these other schemes currently in existence:
The Multi Agency Public Protection Panel Arrangements (MAPPA).
Anti-Social Behaviour schemes.
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 3
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxYouth Inclusion Support Programmes (YISPs) – multi-agency planning groups that
seek to prevent offending and anti-social behaviour by offering voluntary support
services to 8-13 year olds who are at high risk of becoming involved in such activity
and their families.
Drug & Alcohol Reference Group (DARG).
Drug Intervention Programme (DIP).
The Norwich (only) CDRP (Probation/ Police) Persistent Offender Project.
Each scheme recognises the importance of engaging with key partners at a senior level
and has developed and agreed monitoring and information sharing protocols with:
All the CDRPs / RAPs/ RAGs – in respect of providing additional resources and
providing overall authority for the PPO Scheme.
Norfolk Constabulary– with respect to overseeing the identification, tasking and co-
ordination of the scheme.
Norfolk Probation Area – with respect to intensive supervision and case management.
The Norfolk Drugs and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) – with respect to priority
interventions, service developments (e.g. Drug Intervention Programme (DIP)) and
liaison with Treatment Providers.
Health – with respect to drugs, alcohol, the psychiatric services and primary care.
Employment and Training - with respect to Jobcentre Plus and the Norfolk Learning
and Skills Council.
Her Majesty’s Prison (HMP) and Youth Offending Institution (YOI) Norwich and HMP
Wayland – with respect to tracking PPOs, accessing rehabilitation programmes and
planning for release.
The County and District Councils – with respect to a range of services (including
housing, education, social services).
The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) – with respect to the delivery of a Criminal
Justice Service Premium Service.
Norfolk Youth Offending Team – with respect to young people.
1.1.1 Catch and Convict
In the first phase of the development of PPO Schemes Norfolk Constabulary took
responsibility for identifying the target Catch and Convict PPOs using the following matrix.
Through the operation of the National Intelligence Model (NIM) using current
information on their offending behaviour
Looking at the offences that they have been responsible for over the past two years.
Looking at previous history of offending behaviour for those individuals that were at
present in prison.
The numbers of target PPOs are as follows for each BCU scheme:
Eastern Scheme has identified a total of 25 PPOs: 19 for Great Yarmouth, 5 for North
Norfolk, 1 for Broadland.
Western Scheme has identified a total of 34: 19 for Breckland, 15 for Kings Lynn.
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 4
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxCentral Scheme has identified a total of 63 PPOs: 43 for Norwich, 13 for South Norfolk,
7 for Broadland. Central has identified 2 that are aged 17: it is anticipated that these
young people will move between the catch and convict and prevent and deter strands.
1.1.2 Rehabilitate and Resettle
The main agencies involved in rehabilitating PPOs are probation, prisons, police and DIP
providers, drawing upon other partner agencies to provide services under the intervention
pathways set out in the National Reducing Re-offending Action Plan. In many areas, these
agencies already work closely together. The Rehabilitate and Resettle strand is consistent
with existing best practice in this area, namely:
The National Offender Management Service approach to managing offenders
through a single offender manager having ‘case management’ responsibility for an
offender at all stages through their sentence.
‘Resources following risk’. PPOs will have been identified because of their
disproportionate offending or the impact they have on their communities, with the
resources allocated to them reflecting this.
OASYS or ASSET assessments – All PPOs aged 18 and over and sentenced to
community or custodial sentences of a year or more will have an OASYS assessment
to identity their likelihood of re-offending, their risk of serious harm, the needs related to
their offending, and the interventions required to rehabilitate and resettle them. The
Offender Assessment System is a standardised process for the assessment of
offenders that has been developed jointly by the National Probation Service and the
Prison Service. An equivalent process, ASSET, exists for offenders under 18.
The National Reducing Re-offending Action Plan which sets out the framework
under which the pathways should be developed both regionally and locally.
1.1.3 Prevent and Deter
Norfolk Youth Offending Team (NYOT) works with all young offenders who enter the youth
justice system with the aim of providing appropriate interventions to reduce re-offending. It
is recognised, however, that the most active and problematic young offenders are also at
the greatest risk of becoming the next generation of prolific or priority offenders. A small
number of the most prolific young offenders known to the NYOT are already being
managed under the Catch and Convict strand of the PPO strategy. NYOT will target young
offenders who fall immediately below this level for the Prevent element of the overall
strategy.
NYOT will use the ASSET assessment tool on all cases to identify risk factors associated
with the likelihood of further offending by young people. Those receiving the highest
ASSET scores are the young people who are most at risk of becoming future prolific
offenders. ASSET scores used to determine the different levels of intervention activity
provided to individual young offenders by NYOT will be as follows:
Score of >25 : Prevent strand for young offenders requiring intensive YOT interventions
and exit strategies to link to other agencies for on-going support when NYOT
involvement ends. Upon completion of statutory supervision from NYOT, Connexions
will take the lead role
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 5
xxxxxxScore of <24: This is the majority of NYOT activity with young offenders on court
orders. Exit strategies to be in place, which ensure young offenders and families know
of community resources for on-going support where this is appropriate.
Referrals to YISPs where the young person meets the referral criteria and the
programme is available and use of Positive Futures, Positive Activities for Young
People (PAYP) and other local diversionary programmes such as those provided by
the Children’s Fund and other statutory services where appropriate.
No statutory interventions – identified through CDRPs for local diversionary activities
that will include Sure Start and Crucial Crew.
1.1.3.1 Prevent strand
At December 2004, using the ASSET score of >25, 37 young people have been identified
as falling within the Prevent strand. This figure will vary as NYOT will constantly review
levels of risk and need through ASSET. These young people are distributed across the
whole of Norfolk with significant clusters in the main population centres of Norwich, Great
Yarmouth, Kings Lynn and Thetford and the rest distributed across the county. It is
anticipated that only a very few of this number will fall into the Catch and Convict Strand.
Interventions will be targeted at young people with the highest ASSET scores. Contact
levels and enforcement of all NYOT interventions will adhere to the minimum National
Standards for the Supervision of Offenders 2004 and follow Effective Practice Principles
as laid down by the Youth Justice Board.
1.1.3.2 Exit strategy
Each aspect of a young person’s spectrum of needs is addressed through the NYOT
intervention. NYOT will work closely with all of its partners to ensure that young people
have appropriate and swift access to the full range of essential services that are required.
NYOT is funded by Connexions to employ Personal Advisers (PAs), who work
predominantly with young offenders with a more serious offending history.
A planned managed transfer system exists to ensure that these young people are placed
with community based Personal Advisers at the end of orders. All NYOT interventions are
subject to a further ASSET assessment at the end of the Order to gauge progress on the
Order and any necessary referrals, for further work by other agencies, will be made. For
those young people identified as having an ASSET score of >25 at the end of their order,
NYOT Case Managers will ensure referrals are made to agencies to meet remaining levels
of need and risk. Connexions will provide PAs to assist these young people, wherever
possible, to access services and with a particular focus on education training and
employment (ETE) needs.
1.1.3.3 Deter strand
The Deter strand will be concentrated on the relatively small numbers of young people
who are clearly at most risk of becoming prolific offenders in the short to medium term. It
also recognises the needs of those lower down the offending hierarchy and should not be
ignored. In addition, it requires CDRPs to ‘involve themselves with the work of other
agencies focused on those on the cusp of offending’ through building on existing children
and young people focused provision. The guidance states that CDRPs must provide full
practical and financial support for NYOT preventative programmes.
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 6
xxxNYOT Area Managers will work closely with Norfolk Children’s Fund and other key
agencies within CDRPs to develop detailed action plans to take forward the Deter element,
identify what gaps exist in local provision, assist agencies to maximise what is already
available and engage with Local Strategic Partnerships in the allocation of resources.
1.2 Criminogenic factors
National Probation Service (NPS), Norfolk and Norfolk Youth Offending Team (YOT)
conduct assessments of criminogenic need on offenders and young offenders (under-18s)
respectively. In each assessment, a number of factors associated with criminal activity are
assessed for relevance to the individual concerned. Study of the results of a range of
assessments sheds light on the causes of offending.
Probation assessments relate to offenders (i.e. individuals convicted by a court of a
criminal offence) upon whom the Probation Service has undertaken an assessment in
connection with either a Pre-Sentence Report (PSR) or supervision. Supervision might be
either a community order e.g. community rehabilitation (CRO or CPRO), or community
punishment (CPO) or contact resulting from a prison sentence including supervision on
licence after release from prison.
Norfolk Probation Service has provided data for the purpose of the present Audit for the
period 22.5.2003 – 4.6.2004. This is a period of just over 12 months roughly comparable to
the CDRP year 2003-4. Of the 1179 records of assessments during this time, 37 pertain to
offenders whose home address is identified as within the Broadland CDRP area. An
analysis of these records, showing the percentage of offenders significantly affected by
various criminogenic factors, is presented in Fig. 84.
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 760%
54.1%
48.6% 48.6%50%
43.2%
37.8%40%
35.1%
29.7% 29.7%
30%
18.9% 18.9%
20% 16.2%
10%
0%
Offending issue
Fig. 1 Percentage of offenders living in Broadland affected by various criminogenic factors – NPS
assessments 22.5.2003 – 4.6.2004 [Source: NPS]
The most common factor associated with offending was ‘relationships’ (of concern in
54.1% of assessments), followed by ‘emotional well-being’ and ‘thinking and behaviour’
(each 48.6%). The category ‘relationships’ refers to evidence of domestic violence/ partner
abuse and links between relationship issues and offending. ‘Emotional well-being’ refers to
social isolation and the link with offending. ‘Thinking and behaviour’ refers to aggressive/
controlling behaviour and its link to offending, whereas the category ‘attitudes’ refers to
discriminatory attitudes/ behaviour and their link to offending.
YOT assessments are completed at the start of all statutory interventions. Statutory
interventions included are:
Final warnings
Referral orders
Reparation Orders
Action Plan Orders
Community Rehabilitation Orders
Community Punishment and Rehabilitation Orders
Attendance Centre Orders
Supervision Orders
Detention and Training Orders
Section 90-92 Orders
YOT have supplied data for assessments undertaken during the CDRP year 1.4.2003 –
31.3.2004. Of the 686 records of assessments during this time, 53 pertain to young
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 8
xxxxxxxxxx
Relationships
Emotional well-being
Thinking & behaviour
Education, training and employability
Alcohol
Accommodation
Health
Lifestyle & associates
Attitudes
Financial management & income
D ug misuser
Percentage of offendersoffenders whose home address is identified as within the Broadland CDRP area. An
analysis of these records, showing the percentage of young offenders significantly affected
by various criminogenic factors, is presented in Fig. 85.
The categories used by YOT for the purpose of assessment are similar to those used by
the Probation Service, though in some respects they differ. Probation, for example, defines
‘alcohol’ and ‘drug misuse’ as separate categories whereas YOT has a single category
‘substance use’. The YOT category ‘statutory education’ does not apply in Probation
assessments, due to the age range of their clients.
70%
58.5%60%
50%
39.6%
40%
34.0%
32.1%
30% 27.3% 26.4% 26.4%
22.6%
20% 17.0%
15.1%
10% 5.7%
3.8%
0.0%
0%
Offending issue
Fig. 2 Percentage of young offenders living in Broadland affected by various criminogenic factors –
YOT assessments 2003-4 [Source: YOT]
By far the most common factor associated with a young offender’s criminal activity was
‘thinking and behaviour’ (an issue in 58.5% of assessments), followed by ‘lifestyle’
(39.6%).
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 9
Thinking & behaviour
Lifestyle
Family/ personal relationships
Emotional/ mental health
Statutory education
Attitudes to offending
bs anc us
Su t e e
Living arrangements
Perception of self/ others
Neighbourhood
Motivation to change
Physical health
Employment/FE
Percentage of young offenders2 Contact
For all enquiries relating to this report, please contact:
Either
Mervyn Middleton
Community Safety Partnership Co-ordinator
Broadland District Council
Thorpe Lodge
1 Yarmouth Road
Thorpe St Andrew
Norwich
Norfolk
NR7 0DU
Tel: 01603 430510
E-mail: mervyn.middleton@broadland.gov.uk
Or
Adrian Went
Community Safety Inspector
Bethel Street Police Station
Norwich
Norfolk
NR2 1NN
Tel: 0845 456 4567
E-mail: wenta@norfolk.pnn.police.uk
Or
Xany Oliver
Strategy Manager
Norfolk Drug and Alcohol Action Team
Phoenix House
White Lodge Business Park
Hall Road
Norwich
NR4 6DG
Tel: 01603 677577
E-mail: xanthe.oliver.dat@norfolk.gov.uk
CDRP Analyst, Eastern, April 2005 10