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Peelin' hide garibaldi gastronomie searching for uncertainty

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free!Peelin’ HideGaribaldi GastronomieSearching for Uncertainty Ski Reviews and more!Issue # 3December 1999Off-PisteFIRSTVolume II Issue No. IIITRACKShe challenge, repose, and adventure of backcountry travelcombine to create the allure that inspires off-piste skiing andTriding. Surrounded by the silence and beauty of thebackcountry the freedom is indisputable and the terrain limitless.We (backcountry users) are all in search of a higher feeling or longerexperience than we can attain in our daily lives. With the close of1999 and the dawn of a new century, introspection and speculationregarding the future abound.PublisherSpeculating about the future parallels the anticipation I feel for anFree Heel Pressimpending ski season or backcountry adventure. I thrive on theEditorpotential for the unknown and, although the experience may notDavid Waagvary greatly from the expected, it is the thought of the unknownOff-Pistethat fuels the passion. holds a similar sense of anticipation Associate Editorsfor me. Based on the growing response from readers and the Roger Alfred, Erin Collinsincreased traffic to our web site, the future is full of options. Distribution TeamKendall Wills, Mark TometskoDoes the Twenty-First Century mark the dawn of the electronicMark ‘Llama’ Longtineage? We are diehard fans of hardcopy print at Off-Piste but theunknown potential of the Internet holds much attraction. Visit our Contributing ...

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free! Peelin’ Hide Garibaldi Gastronomie Searching for Uncertainty Ski Reviews and more! Issue # 3 December 1999 Off-PisteFIRST Volume II Issue No. IIITRACKS he challenge, repose, and adventure of backcountry travel combine to create the allure that inspires off-piste skiing andTriding. Surrounded by the silence and beauty of the backcountry the freedom is indisputable and the terrain limitless. We (backcountry users) are all in search of a higher feeling or longer experience than we can attain in our daily lives. With the close of 1999 and the dawn of a new century, introspection and speculation regarding the future abound. PublisherSpeculating about the future parallels the anticipation I feel for an Free Heel Pressimpending ski season or backcountry adventure. I thrive on the Editorpotential for the unknown and, although the experience may not David Waagvary greatly from the expected, it is the thought of the unknown Off-Pistethat fuels the passion. holds a similar sense of anticipation Associate Editors for me. Based on the growing response from readers and the Roger Alfred, Erin Collins increased traffic to our web site, the future is full of options. Distribution Team Kendall Wills, Mark TometskoDoes the Twenty-First Century mark the dawn of the electronic Mark ‘Llama’ Longtineage? We are diehard fans of hardcopy print at Off-Piste but the unknown potential of the Internet holds much attraction. Visit our Contributing Writers ever-growing web site (www.offpistemag.com) as we add Internet Karen Holt, Nils Larson, Dave McKee technology into the coming year. So strange, it is to consider the Paul Nicalozzo, Kim Starrett, Niko Weiss electronic age in conjunction with backcountry adventure but we Contributing Photographers cannot deny the resource and degree of use the Internet offers for Dave Flemming, Michael Halle vital information on weather, avalanche, and equipment. Karen Holt, Dave McKee, Craig Peterson Riding the theme of introspection, this issue of Off-Piste looks into Off-Piste the backcountry mind in Searching for Uncertainty by Kim Starrett. PO Box 932 Kim shares her passion for the backcountry and draws parallels Winthrop, WA 98862 to the Zen Buddhist mind. Whether making turns in untracked 509-996-8170 powder or staying focused on an ascent, the meditative mind will freeheel@offpistemag.com find much food for thought. And speaking of food, Garibaldi www.offpistemag.com Gastronomie by David J. McKee, shares a recipe from an impromptu trip in the Coast Range north of Vancouver, BC. The right mix of Copyright 1999 by Free Heel Press friends, food, and weather make for a memorable trip for everyone Winthrop, Washington, USA involved. Circulation: 5,000 at selected outlets inRegardless of your backcountry destination or goals , we all know British Columbia, Idaho, Montana,the value of functional skins for getting where we need to go. Free Oregon, and Washingtonheel expert Nils Larson, shares words of wisdom regarding proper Visit our web site to findskin use in Peelin’ Hide. No one wants to have skin trouble in the a location near you.backcountry and Nils offers sage advice regarding proper skin use and maintenance; take care of your skins and they will take Subscriptions: 4 issues = $10 includes postage,care of you. labor, and something left over to help the next issue. In addition, we look to Canadian avalanche expert Niko Weiss for words of wisdom regarding route selection in potential avalanche Off-Piste seeks your submissions. Send us your writing, terrain. Avy 101 presents many questions for consideration when artwork, photographs, news items, and calendar listings. If evaluating backcountry goals. Niko raises issues that often remain you would like your work returned, you must include a unmentioned and deserve discussion when traveling in the stamped addressed envelope! For detailed submission backcountry. information write us or visit our web site. Read through the stories and tips inside this issue, take what you The opinions in Off-Piste do not necessarily represent those of the need, and let us know what you think. Enjoy the close of 1999 and publisher or editorial staff. No part of Off-Piste may be reproduced in may the New Year be filled with deep snows, and great turns! any form without prior written consent from Free Heel Press. Warning: Backcountry skiing, boarding, and climbing are inherently dangerous. Inexperience and poor judgement can kill. The information inCheers, Off-Piste is not meant to replace experience or sound judgement. Travel with others and be aware. Play Smart, Live Longer! Dave Cover: Photographer: Michael Halle Location: Albert Canyon, BC Corrections Skier: Jim ‘Quadzilla’ Hirshfield -Some un-edited copy made it to print by mistake in the last issue. Our Contents: Photographer: Dave Waag apologies to our editors (who put time into the editing) and our readers Location: Chugach, AK who survived the error. -The October Calendar listed the wrong phone number for the Escape Route located in Whistler, BC. The correct number is 604-938-3228. 2 Off-Piste December 99 INSIDE DEPARTMENTS WHAT’S UPP .4 LETTERS P.4 BACKCOUNTRY KITCHEN P.9 GALLERY P.10 GEAR TALK P.12 AVY 101 P.14 BACKCOUNTRY MEDIC P.16 CALENDAR P.18 FEATURES P.5 Searching For Uncertainty Skiing and the Buddhist Mind By Kim Starrett P.6 Peelin’ Hide Treat Your Skins Well and be Treated Well in Return By Nils Larson P.8 Garibaldi Gastronomie A last Minute Recipe for Fun By David J. McKee Josh, Patrick, Brian, and Alex fight the wind on Mt. Hood. Off-Piste Photo December 99 Off-PisteOff-PisteOff-PisteOff-PisteOff-Piste 3 motorized crowd needs to get involved in the process or risk being left without a voice. Rally your local scene to inquire as to the plans and upcoming processes before it is too late!What’s Up Contact: Denny Bschor, Director USDA Forest Service Recreation, Heritage & Wilderness ResourcesThe Wallowa Lake Tramway P.O. Box 96090 Washington, D.C. 20090-6090Ski Area Proposal (202) 205-1240, e-mail - dbschor/wo@fs.fed.us ne more plan in the bigger, better, faster, more department.OThe Wallowa Lake Tramway (WLT) located about 5 miles from Pelican Butte Ski Area Joseph, Oregon currently operates a gondola servicing Mt. Howard at the head of Wallowa Lake. Built in the 1970, the gondola rises Development Update 3,800 feet to the summit of Mt. Howard (8,150 feet) allowing access to a restaurant and hiking trails. The existing operation runs from he proposed Pelican Butte ski development near Klamath Falls, Memorial Day weekend until October and has offered only TOregon continues to seek approval. Detailed information on occasional winter access. the plan is available at www.pelican2000.com. The site is maintained by a group who supports the development so do not expectWLT proposes to expand their existing operations to include a 1,500- unbiased information but anyone interested in finding out moreacre ski area development on Mt. Howard’s NE aspects. The plan should look at the plan. The forest service is also a source ofincludes upgrading the current gondola, building four new double information and should be contacted with any comments orchairs, installing two surface lifts, and renovating the existing questions regarding the development plans.facilities to accommodate approximately 2,400 guests per day. More information is available from the Eagle Cap Ranger District and Contact: Forest Supervisor – Chuck Grahamyour comments are encouraged. Winema National Forest Contact: 2819 Dahlia St. District Ranger Klamath Falls, OR 97601 Eagle Cap Ranger District 541-883-6714 88401 Highway 82 e-mail - ferickson/r6pnw_winema@fs.fed.us Enterprise, OR 97828 Wb Site - www.fs.fed.us/r6/winema/ USFS Recreation Master Plan Letters he United States Forest Service is currently working onTrecreation management plans for the future. Plans are being Hello Off-Piste,drafted to address recreation in the ever-changing world of public First off, love your paper. The Articles are great andlands. The plans have been through several revisions but have had the pictures exceptional. I really enjoyed the featurelittle or no input from non-motorized recreation groups. The current articles and was wondering where the classifieds areproposals emphasize construction, facilities, and fees. The non- and am hoping for a trip review. Ben Allen - Gresham, OR Thanks for the kind words. We now offer classifieds. 3/4 inch classified ads run $5/issue. Send ‘em via e- mail or US- mail. - Editor Hi all, Just picked up Issue #2 at Mountain Gear in Spokane. Good job, good mag, way to go! I would like to know if you have a single copy of issue #1 left over, and what the cost may be. Steve Reynolds - Spokane Back issues are available at no charge (for now, anyway) and subscriptions are available for $10. - Editor Editors; Thank you for the very favourable review of the G3 TARGA telemark binding. Jeff did a very nice job highlighting the unique features found on no other tele binding. There was one key point that Jeff brought up that needs clarifying. In paragraph ten, the author states that the ‘binding actually loosens on the heel as you lift the Continued on p.18 4 Off-Piste December 99 Searching For Uncertainty on the Slopes by Kim Starrett Off-Piste Photo long time, the boot catches up with the foot and gets into the game.he sign reads “Warning: No Avalanche Control The leather stretches and pulls. Again, the veteran user faces thisBeyond This Point”. A boot packed trail climbs uncertainty with the confidence and hope of a Buddhist monk.T steeply towards the rocky crags of Three-Way Peak. Finally, the leather stretches to its limit, the binding engages, and Mt. Rainier looms to the west, a plume of white smoke the ski turns on its edge. The joy of this turn is difficult to describe. blows from its summit. However, here in Crystal It is a moment of awareness – mindful of one’s feet, the spray of Mountain’s backcountry, the quiet warmth of the sun snow in one’s face, the automatic feeling of hands, ankles, knees, waist all working in synchronicity – the tele skier knows why she iscalms me and turns the corners of my mouth toward here. Only the moment exists: pure exhilaration, pure movement.heaven. If conditions are just right: the snow soft and supportive, the sky I follow my friend, Ron, as he ascends toward a small gap below blue and forgiving, the untracked hill sloping perfectly underneath the summit of Three-Way. In Washington State’s best impression you like a soft white escalator, carving a tele-turn provides that of a Utah License plate, the sharp rock forms an arch through which sudden burst of insight beyond logic or reason. Linking several a small circle of blue sky blinks wisely like the eye of a bodhisattva turns together in a series of crescent moons can be a slice of satori. who postpones his own enlightenment to assist others. As we Like Zen aspirants, telemarkers know that words and even picturesapproach the top, I see delicate icicles hanging like eye lashes in often dilute the experience of the backcountry and therefore betraythe cold shadow of the arch. I remember the Zen Buddhist aim to the purity of the experience. Tele skiers tour the backcountry innot draw the individual away from the world but rather to return it search of the elusive and hard to describe perfect run. Even thewith a fresh perspective. It is often amidst nature’s names of the bowls below me – three untracked cirquessplendor that we are reminded to return to seemingly affectionately known as “loada”, “packa”, and “smoka”mundane moments with the vigor of a Buddhist Monk – signal initiation into a different world, the backcountryor even a weekend tele-skier with endless powder world. Yet, mastery of the vocabulary and locationsawaiting her. cannot substitute for the experience of carving the The goal of the Zen aspirant is to reach satori, an intuitive perfect turn. Similarly, Buddha-mind cannot be shared experience that changes one’s outlook. Reason and words through study or reading about the life of the Buddha. only take one so far towards satori. At some point one needs Instead, it spreads like a flame from one candle to another. The intuition or what Soren Kierkegaard referred to as a “leap of Zen aspirant can undergo training to achieve the Buddha-mind, faith” to get over the crevasse that separates us from an but it is achieved through the experience of contemplation. unfettered freedom of understanding. This uncertain leap is not Buddha-mind cannot be taught. The backcountry mind is much accidental nor can methodical planning the same. bring it about. The moment will arrive I approach the summit mindfully.“The Zen aspirant can undergounannounced, cloaked in fear and doubt. Aware that, like any of life’s moments,One needs to practice uncertainty in training to be brought to Buddha- it reflects both samsara (the stickyorder to feel comfortable with a leap of swamp of desire and greed) as well asmind, but it must be done throughfaith. One must be mindful. nirvana (the transcendence of desire and the experience of contemplation. ItIn telemarking, there is much greed). “Here we are”, Ron announces uncertainty. Changing lead legs with a wry smile. I leave my skis on acannot be taught. Telemarking is effectively requires a decidedly small ledge and walk carefully to the much the same.”unintuitive commitment to the fall line. tiny gap where Ron’s silhouette stands In leather boots, this uncertainty is against the blue sky as if guarding an magnified by a hundred. Even after the open doorway. He moves over to let me new lead leg points the way to the next turn, the boot stretches peer down the nearly vertical shaft below us. A brave skier has lazily before catching up with the foot and finally puts the ski on recently been here. Clear tracks run straight down from our edge. The veteran leather boot user comes to expect this moment of precarious perch. I wonder at the uncertainty he or she must have uncertainty. First, the foot decides to turn and after an interminably continued on p.17 Decemebr 99 Off-Piste 5 PEELIN’ HIDE BY NILS LARSON he sky is clear, the day is cold. You and your go, good skin glue ranks right up with the combustion engine when cohorts have just finished your third run through it works right. Not all glue is great though, and some companiesTknee-deep powder. It’s getting late and now it’s seem to change their glue from year to year, often to its detriment. I have had new skins that barely stuck directly out of the box andtime to head for the barn. Amidst smiles and the then got worse. Good skin glue should be sticky. Not namby pambysatisfactions of a day well spent, you pull your skins out sticky, where they separate with a gentle pull from the wrist, butof your pack, hook one on a ski tip, and rip... but they really sticky, requiring a hearty tug that produces a satisfying rip don’t rip. They fall apart like limp strips of old carpet when they separate. and slide easily from the base of your skis with only a One develops a certain style inhint of glue remaining. the donning and offing of skins.“The dreaded faux pas for any backcountry skier has The dreaded faux pas for any The overriding rule is: KEEP THE struck. Your friends, their breath escaping in littlebackcountry skier has struck. GLUE SIDE OUT OF THE SNOW. Your friends, their breath Beyond that, there is ample roomclouds in the dropping temperature, shuffle their skis escaping in little clouds in the for individual expression. Theand send sideways glances in your direction... dropping temperature, shuffle putting on is generally an knowing, disapproving. You knew your glue was weaktheir skis and send sideways unhurried affair as one meditates glances in your direction... on the climb ahead. The twobefore the trip, but did you fix it? Nooooo....” knowing, disapproving. You types of attachment systems are knew your glue was weak before the trip, but did you fix it? the simple tip loop and the “euro fix” system that has a stretch Nooooo.... did you keep your skins warm in your coat? Noooo... hook on the tip and a fixed hook on the tail. The “euro kit” weighs Now you are strapping your skins on with reams of duct tape from more but is adjustable to different length skis and does not rely on your buddy’s pole and hoping you will just the glue at the tail to hold the skin in make it to the top of the hill. place. If you use just the tip hook system, trim the tail end of the skin in a half circle The first time I saw skins in use they were to decrease peelage. real, authentic sealskins. Complete with the color variations found on the particular Pulling skins tends to have a bit more seal that donated his hide to such a worthy urgency than putting them on. There are cause. Unfortunately, on that particular several stylish techniques out there to get Sierra day the snow was warm and wet the job done quickly and without on the south slopes; cold and dry on the removing your skis. The basic ground north slopes. I had wax on my skis (not rules are a) hang onto them, b) don’t rap much better) and I remember wondering, your buddy in the head when you rip one as I looked at those skins, how so much off, and c) keep the glue side OUT of the snow could stick to the bottom of a ski. snow. There are many opinions on the The skins had leather straps instead of process of folding skins. The two most glue and with 12 to 18 inches of snow common are the tail to tip fold, where the frozen on them, acted more like boat tail is brought up to the tip and the two anchors then climbing tools. In hindsight, ends are stuck together, and the “thirds” a serious rub down with a chunk of wax method, where the tip and the tail are would have done them a world of good. folded in half way and meet at the center However, at the time, I was not impressed. of the skin. I prefer the first method, as it It was almost ten years before I tried skins requires less calculation. You put your tip on my skis. and tail together, run your hand down and it is done. Either way, the critical point is Climbing skins are largely responsible for to make sure you align the skin edges so the pain or pleasure of a tour in the there is no glued area exposed. backcountry. It usually depends on how Dave Pettry prepares for descent - Michael Halle Photothe glue is working. As far as inventions 6 Off-Piste December 99 Mike Cummings ascends Paradise bowl, Selkirks, BC - Michael Halle Photo Skin glue works best when it is warm, so when your skins are not in use, especially if it is cold out, store them as close to your own skin as you dare. I like to wrap them around behind and through the back of my bibs so the ends tuck in the front. This can be a bit cold at times, but warm skins are sticky skins. Take care of your skins and they will take care of you. They do not like wax, especially grip wax, so keep your bases clean and scraped. The skin bases (that’s the sticky part) like to collect things; lint, dog hair, bits of your lunch, even the little rubber gripper dots off your gloves. Skins will hoard these things like packrats if you let them. Once these items start to colonize your skins, they will create a weak spot in the glue where snow and ice can form a slick surface. This is the fate of all skin glue – it will keep a small memento from every tour you go on and get grimier and grimier as it ages. Natural law dictates that glue is an unnatural state and nature will not rest until it makes that glue whole again, with whatever it can throw its way. All you can do is forestall the journey to its inevitable conclusion. How long will glue last? Quality, well cared-for glue can last through years of heavy use but, eventually, (and like our friend at the start of this column should have done) skins need to be re-glued. Is it Goin’ up - Karen Holt Photo difficult? Not particularly, unless something goes terribly wrong. Is it messy? Why yes, it can be comically messy if you are not careful. All that old glue can magically spring to life when you throw a little heat its way. However, new glue, when applied properly, will rejuvenate old skins and get you on your way. When re-gluing, start by cleaning your skins. Put strips of rags or paper bags on the glue side of the skins and iron them at low to medium heat (start low and experiment). This should, when repeated enough, get your skins clean. The cleaner they are the better the glue job will work, and believe me; you do not want to do this all the time. You can also clean your skins with highly toxic solvents. This is often quicker than the iron method but these solvents, as well as making bombing runs on your brain cells, are extremely flammable. Once clean, be sure to use good glue (Ascension Gold Label) and follow the instructions. The easiest method for re-gluing is to take the skins into your local backcountry supply store or send them off to a re- gluing service (Ascension has a great one) and pay them to do it. Repairing skins can be essential in the backcountry. My tool kit contains Voile straps and duct tape– for strapping and/or taping skins on with bad glue; a few extra rivets for the tail and tip hooks; and a chunk of skin wax in case my skins ice up. There is not much else that can go wrong with skins (short of losing them.) Backcountry skiing does not require skins; grip-wax and no-wax skis also work. However, good skins are hard to beat for long, sustained climbing or climbing with a pack. If you have never used skins, borrow or rent a pair and try them out! Nils Larson runs Free Heels offering backcountry and freeheel ski workshops and videos. Visit www.freeheels.com for more information. December 99 Off-Piste 7 David McKee Photo humidity. How often can you put out your wet gloves before bedOne Nalgene of scotch. and wake up with them dry? Obviously, as we fell asleep watching Seven friends. for shooting stars, a miracle was in the making. Fourteen skis. Not to bore you with details of the “main course”, but the next day Great weather. dawned clear. We skied safely across glaciers well stuffed with snow and over old avalanche debris. As we moved higher, the mountains Mix together and voilà . . . revealed themselves from every direction. a weekend trés, trés delicieux! We skied below peaks familiar from the highway but foreign from he original recipe was cooked up a day before our departure: where we stood. “How about climbing Mt. Garibaldi up to the left?T“Alright, the four of us will leave work early, meet up with two Capital idea.” We dropped our packs, climbed upward, dropped cars, drop one car at the far end, and start skiing in around 4 pm”. our skis and kicked up to the summit, where we enjoyed even better views of the environs. Clouds appeared on the horizon, so back What actually happened? down we climbed and into our skis we clicked. Magical turns delivered us to our packs at the base.“Sorry I am a bit [2 hours] late. By the way I brought some other guys along but one guy has to leave a day early so...” With only bivy sacs on “As we skied, the stars seemed to brighten, board for this trip, weFinally, after we crammed, shuffled, and shuttled, we made a snow cave to coverarrived at the trailhead and started skiing at 8:30 pm, slightly multiply, and light most of the terrain before our torsos in case of stormyoff our 4 pm mark. Well, they say you simply cannot rush a us. This fine offering was topped with an weather. As our cheesefine wine or a good trip. The initial delays and occasional unusual glaze of northern lights, an fondue congealed into an“whoa shit” descent into darkness were a small price to pay. experience that is difficult to obtain anytime unappealing mass, the As we skied, the of year around Vancouver.” snowflakes began to fall. stars seemed to The weather moved inbrighten, multiply, and over night and dumped a bit of snow: just enough to titillate thelight most of the terrain people back at the office. In culinary terms, I would compare thebefore us. This fine storm to a radicchio salad served in between courses. The saladoffering was topped does not really taste good, but it is good for you.with an unusual glaze of northern We began the new day with an unpalatable breakfast that we lights, an washed down with our almost full bottle of scotch. Despite having experience that is shed several pounds of food, the hope that my pack would now be difficult to obtain something like a comfortable extra limb were dashed as I put the anytime of year beast on my back. Instead, it felt more like some kind of alien around implant. Fortunately, the discomfort was soon forgotten as we Vancouver. An descended the Sentinel Glacier toward dessert: Garibaldi Lake in additional an emerging sun. The remainder of the day was spent napping on ingredient that the edges of the frozen lake prior to a bark-and-needle ski back to appeals to the the cars. west coast outdoorsman and Despite our initial digression form the original recipe, the repast meteorologist was most tasty and popular with all of the diners. This recipe will alike was the definitely be earmarked in the cookbook for future use. uncommonly lowDave McKee Photo David McKee skis, climbs, bikes, runs, and works in Vancouver, BC. 8 Off-Piste December 99 Backcountry Kitchen Mmm Coffee Introduction by Karen Holt t had been eight days of Sleepy Time tea, hot chocolate, and Gatorade, when Whitney called fromIher tent, “Karen, do you want a cup of coffee?” Whitney shouted out those aroma filled words and my nostrils began to twitch, my heart skipped a beat, and my hands shook in anticipation as I dug through the mass of frost covered down products in search of my cup. “Yes”, I hollered above the howling wind. “Yes, I want a cup of coffee. Yes, I deserve a cup of coffee. Yes, I need a cup of coffee.” A self proclaimed (and proud) coffee snob, I am unwilling to drink just any cup of coffee. When someone offers me a cup, it had better be good: not just strong (which, when done poorly, makes for a bitter cup) but that balance between rich earthy flavor, smooth body, and dark roast. Much like a mature balanced wine, good coffee is not a simple affair. The roast of the bean and the process with which the coffee is brewed are important steps toward a good cup. The coffee fix is easily remedied on a multi day tour. A cone filter, fresh ground Peets, and I have no complaints. However, when on the road, good coffee can be difficult to come by. Jonesin’ for a cup only to be let down by a poor attempt at an Americano can wreck an entire day. To help address the need for quality java, we are assembling a list of locations where one can satisfy the need without compromising quality. We are soliciting your favorite coffee stops and shops. Now, we are not after your favorite city location. We are seeking the lesser known, the out of the way, yet convenient to the trailhead or ski hill, coffee stops and shops where one can get a fix while on Participate in the the way to or from catching turns. Share your knowledge of quality coffee. Not every espresso stand or coffee shop is created equal, Off-Piste Coffee Search we want to know the good ones. visitTo participate in the great coffee search, visit us on-line at www.offpistemag.com and fill out our coffee shop survey. We will www.offpistemag.comeven send you a free Off-Piste sticker (while supplies last) for takin’ your time to fill out the questionnaire. If you are computer free, drop us a line via US-mail.Off-Piste PO Box 932 Winthrop, WA 98862. Cheers! Dave December 99 Off-Piste 9 GALLERY We moderns, we half- barbarians. We are in the midst of our bliss only when we are most in danger -Nietzsche Skier:Steve Fiddler Amish Location:Wapato Traverse, Canadian Rockies Photographer:David Flemming Skier:Craig Peterson, Esquire Location:Washington Cascades Photographer:Karen Holt 10 Off-Piste December 99