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Frost & Sullivan: CES Improved the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride Wires to Help Deliver Image Quality that is Comparable with Current MRI Scans'

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Frost & Sullivan: CES Improved theFrost & Sullivan: CES Improved the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride Wires to Help Deliver Image Quality that is Comparable with Current MRI Scans' PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, March 21, 2014 -- The technology's maintenance-free operation makes it 40 percent cheaper than current MRI scans Based on its recent analysis of the superconductor technology for MRI market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Cutting Edge Superconductors, Inc. with the 2013 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation Leadership. CES, Inc. developed a proprietary technology based on magnesium diboride superconducting wire, which enabled cryogen-free 1.5T and 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with image qualities similar to the currently available 1.5T MRI. The technology leveraged innovative customizations in the chemistry of the material by adding both magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities to magnesium diboride wires. This resulted in much-required improvements to the critical currents of superconducting magnesium diboride wires. The cryogen-free 0.5T MRI delivers images of average quality when compared to 1.5T MRI, as the quality of image is directly dependent on the square of the strength of the magnetic field. However, the current 1.5T MRI technology requires the use of cost-intensive liquid helium, which increases the cost of maintenance, operation, as well as initial cost. "The next-generation, cryogen-free 1.5T and 3.

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Published 21 March 2014
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Language English
Frost & Sullivan: CES Improved the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride Wires to Help Deliver Image Quality that is Comparable with Current MRI Scans'

PR Newswire

-- The technology's maintenance-free operation makes it 40 percent cheaper than current MRI scans