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Frost & Sullivan: Label-Free Technology is a High Potential Market with Myriad Unexplored Applications

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Frost & Sullivan: Label-Free Technology is a High Potential Market with Myriad Unexplored Applications PR Newswire LONDON, July 3, 2012 - Label-free Technology is Still Poorly Understood, but has Proven to have Great Potential for its Small but Expanding End-user Base LONDON, July 3, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The inherent advantages of label-free technology is a significant factor in driving its adoption. The promise of reducing drug failure caused by toxicity is another key factor likely to boost the uptake of label-free technology. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.drugdiscovery.frost.com), Western European Market for Label Free Detection (LFD) Systems, finds that the market earned revenues of $60.9 million in 2010 and estimates this to reach $160.9 million in 2017 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 14.9 per cent from 2010-2017. The research covers key segments including biochemical assays and cell-based assays. "The key advantage of label-free technologies is that it is true to its word: it is "label-free" as it requires no labelling or reporter molecules," notes Frost & Sullivan Programme Manager Ranjith Gopinathan. "Labels are known for their altering effect on molecules under study which, in turn, alters its binding or physicochemical properties." The absence of labels also means lesser interference from compound autofluorescence and colour quenching, therefore leading to fewer false positives and negatives.

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Frost & Sullivan: Label-Free Technology is a
High Potential Market with Myriad Unexplored
Applications
PR Newswire
LONDON, July 3, 2012
- Label-free Technology is Still Poorly Understood, but has Proven to
have Great Potential for its Small but Expanding End-user Base
LONDON
, July 3, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The inherent advantages of label-free
technology is a significant factor in driving its adoption. The promise of
reducing drug failure caused by toxicity is another key factor likely to boost the
uptake of label-free technology.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.drugdiscovery.frost.com),
Western European Market for Label Free Detection (LFD) Systems
,
finds that the market earned revenues of
$60.9 million
in 2010 and estimates
this to reach
$160.9 million
in 2017 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR)
of 14.9 per cent from 2010-2017. The research covers key segments including
biochemical assays and cell-based assays.
"The key advantage of label-free technologies is that it is true to its word: it is
"label-free" as it requires no labelling or reporter molecules," notes Frost &
Sullivan Programme Manager Ranjith Gopinathan. "Labels are known for their
altering effect on molecules under study which, in turn, alters its binding or
physicochemical properties."
The absence of labels also means lesser interference from compound
autofluorescence and colour quenching, therefore leading to fewer false
positives and negatives. It is also devoid of problems arising from secondary
detection of auxiliary reagents.
"By virtue of its direct detection capabilities, label-free technologies could
enable the use of natural ligands and substrates that is currently not possible
with label-based detection assays," adds Gopinathan. "Avoidance of radioactive
labels is an attractive factor for label-free technologies as this means better lab
safety and cost savings from evasion of radioactive waste disposable
procedures."
Of the many reasons for escalating clinical development costs, drug failure
caused by toxicity is a chronic and growing problem in drug development. The
problem of toxicity holds the promise of being successfully addressed with new,
discovery-stage tools of which label-free technology is a key part.
While these are promising trends, consolidations in the pharmaceutical industry
will negatively impact the growth of the life science research market and, by
extension, of label-free detection systems.
"The large number of consolidations in the pharmaceutical industry is a harsh
reality for all life science research tools providers," explains Gopinathan.
"Consolidation significantly shrinks the addressable end-user pool as research
facilities start to share instrumentation and resources. Sometimes after a
merger or acquisition, companies segregate certain specialised kinds of work to
certain research facilities, and so only those facilities will be equipped with the
required equipment."