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Frost & Sullivan: Military Helicopter Industry to Decline by Almost Half while Civil Market Flourishes

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Frost & Sullivan: Military HelicopterFrost & Sullivan: Military Helicopter Industry to Decline by Almost Half while Civil Market Flourishes PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, Dec. 17, 2013 -- While DoD budgets are slashed, civil helicopter purchases will grow to support a broader range of industries As Department of Defense (DoD) budgets tighten, military services will be forced to spend less on helicopters. The declining budget is also driving trends of upgrading and remanufacturing existing platforms rather than funding new helicopter programs. Conversely, the civil helicopter market has rebounded after the 2008-2009 recession that resulted in a lack of financing to support civil helicopter purchases. The improving U.S. economy has allowed for recapitalization of old aircraft as well as new purchases to support growing demand from industries such as emergency medical services, oil and gas. Frost & Sullivan finds the DoD spent $12.41 billion on military helicopters in 2012 and estimates this to decrease to $6.70 billion in 2018. The U.S. civil helicopter purchases, on the other hand, generated about $0.89 billion in 2012, and this is estimated to increase to $1.07 by 2020. Click here to view the video on Frost & Sullivan's Analysis of the US DoD and Civil Helicopter Markets analysis and gain access to the online community – http://bit.ly/1jc23x0. For more information on this research, please email Jennifer Carson, Corporate Communications, at jennifer.carson@frost.

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Published 17 December 2013
Reads 6
Language English
Frost & Sullivan: Military Helicopter Industry to Decline by Almost Half while Civil Market Flourishes

PR Newswire

-- While DoD budgets are slashed, civil helicopter purchases will grow to support a broader range of industries

As Department of Defense (DoD) budgets tighten, military services will be forced to spend less on helicopters. The declining budget is also driving trends of upgrading and remanufacturing existing platforms rather than funding new helicopter programs. Conversely, the civil helicopter market has rebounded after the 2008-2009 recession that resulted in a lack of financing to support civil helicopter purchases. The improving U.S. economy has allowed for recapitalization of old aircraft as well as new purchases to support growing demand from industries such as emergency medical services, oil and gas.