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Frost & Sullivan: Next-Generation Sequencing Services is one of the Fastest Growing Markets in the Life Sciences Industry

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Frost & Sullivan: Next-Generation Sequencing Services is one of the Fastest Growing Markets in the Life Sciences Industry PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 28, 2012 - New applications provide a thrust to this expanding market MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 28, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The growing list of applications enabled by next-generation sequencing technology has allowed sequencing service providers to make inroads into new customer segments and research fields, such as cancer research, genetic disease research, metagenomics, newborn sequencing, and clinical sequencing. Researchers lacking in-house sequencing infrastructure or experience are gaining access to the latest technologies through service providers offering complete sequencing workflows. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan's (http://www.drugdiscovery.frost.com) Strategic Analysis of the U.S. Next-Generation Sequencing Services Market research finds that the market earned revenues of $160.0 million in 2011 and estimates this to reach $550.0 million in 2016. If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an email to Britni Myers, Corporate Communications, at britni.myers@frost.com, with your full name, company name, job title, telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and country.

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Frost & Sullivan: Next-Generation Sequencing
Services is one of the Fastest Growing Markets
in the Life Sciences Industry
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 28, 2012
- New applications provide a thrust to this expanding market
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California
,
June 28, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- The growing list of
applications enabled by next-generation sequencing technology has allowed
sequencing service providers to make inroads into new customer segments and
research fields, such as cancer research, genetic disease research,
metagenomics, newborn sequencing, and clinical sequencing. Researchers
lacking in-house sequencing infrastructure or experience are gaining access to
the latest technologies through service providers offering complete sequencing
workflows.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan's (http://www.drugdiscovery.frost.com)
Strategic Analysis of the U.S. Next-Generation Sequencing Services
Market
research finds that the market earned revenues of
$160.0 million
in
2011 and estimates this to reach
$550.0 million
in 2016.
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an
email to Britni Myers, Corporate Communications, at britni.myers@frost.com,
with your full name, company name, job title, telephone number, company
email address, company website, city, state and country.
"When new sequencing applications emerge, researchers do not always have
the expertise to conduct them with in-house infrastructure, providing a
significant opportunity for service providers," said Frost & Sullivan Senior
Industry Analyst Christianne Bird. "In particular, the two emerging applications
of RNA-sequencing and exome sequencing are proving lucrative to service
providers."
Genome centers and core facilities account for a larger percentage of the next-
generation sequencing installed base than commercial service providers.
Academic researchers may use core facilities for at-cost services (reagents and
labor only); however, unlike commercial service providers that offer sample-to-
answer services, these facilities do not always provide full bioinformatics and
analysis capabilities.
While users of sequencing core facilities and non-profit genome centers must
have experience with genomic data as well as in-house expertise and software
to conduct analyses, customers of commercial service providers require little to
no familiarity with the technology as they purchase turnkey services with
comprehensive data analysis.
Nevertheless, despite researchers' eagerness to use sequencing services, the
decreasing sequencing costs, influx of new competitors, and increasing
adoption of sequencing in basic laboratories has placed the market in a state of
flux. Commercial sequencing service providers can stay afloat in this dynamic
market by differentiating themselves with value-added services.
In the next five years, next-generation sequencing is expected to gain currency
in clinics for the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, in clinical trials for patient