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Frost & Sullivan: Upgrading the On-Board Power-Net to 42V Will Pave the Way for a 48V Power Net

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Frost & Sullivan: Upgrading the On-Board Power-Net to 42V Will Pave the Way for a 48V Power Net PR Newswire LONDON, June 26, 2012 - Suppliers actively working with car OEMs in close coordination to develop 48V-specific solutions LONDON, June 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Electrification of the automobile is not limited to the Electric Vehicle (EV) space. Conventional automobiles of today are partly electric in their own way, with most systems in the vehicle having electrical and electronic connections for better functionality. Certain high-end vehicles possess more than 90 Electronic Control Units (ECUs) to control the various modules within the car, making the car both sophisticated and complicated. However, added functions such as Electric Power Steering (EPS), Electronic Braking Systems (EBS), GPS-based Navigation units, Engine Management Systems etc. make the Electrical and Electronic (E/E) architecture of the car highly complicated. Future systems are expected to be all the more refined, warranting more ECUs and a much more robust E/E network. "The car of today has to step-up from a simple 12 Volt on-board power supply to 42V or a proposed 48V power net, in order to support all new systems and applications for enhanced performance, thereby demanding a massive investment across the entire ecosystem," says Frost & Sullivan Industry Analyst, Prana Tharthiharan Natarajan.

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Frost & Sullivan: Upgrading the On-Board
Power-Net to 42V Will Pave the Way for a 48V
Power Net
PR Newswire
LONDON, June 26, 2012
- Suppliers actively working with car OEMs in close coordination to
develop 48V-specific solutions
LONDON
,
June 26, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- Electrification of the automobile is not
limited to the Electric Vehicle (EV) space. Conventional automobiles of today
are partly electric in their own way, with most systems in the vehicle having
electrical and electronic connections for better functionality. Certain high-end
vehicles possess more than 90 Electronic Control Units (ECUs) to control the
various modules within the car, making the car both sophisticated and
complicated.
However, added functions such as Electric Power Steering (EPS), Electronic
Braking Systems (EBS), GPS-based Navigation units, Engine Management
Systems etc. make the Electrical and Electronic (E/E) architecture of the car
highly complicated. Future systems are expected to be all the more refined,
warranting more ECUs and a much more robust E/E network.
"The car of today has to step-up from a simple 12 Volt on-board power supply
to 42V or a proposed 48V power net, in order to support all new systems and
applications for enhanced performance, thereby demanding a massive
investment across the entire ecosystem," says Frost & Sullivan Industry Analyst,
Prana Tharthiharan Natarajan. "The benefits of reduced weight of wiring
harnesses, more powerful motors for the various motorised applications and
high-power ICs do substantiate that the automobile is poised to offer the end-
consumer a better experience. But will the benefits also outweigh the costs, is
the crucial question."
Key German auto OEMs BMW, Daimler and Audi-Porsche-Volkswagen released
a joint statement in
June 2011
, stating that they are keen on introducing a 48V
on-board power net as a supplementary power supply for high-power
applications such as Electric Power Steering (EPS), Brake-by-wire (BBW) and
Heating, Ventilation & Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Not only is it technically
and economically difficult to employ these applications with a standard 12V
power net, but it is also increasingly difficult to draw the best performance
characteristics with the lack of a high-voltage power net.
On the other hand, not all components and systems designed for the present
12V power-net can be used in the proposed 48V power net. Suppliers are
actively working with OEMs in close coordination to develop 48V-specific
solutions.
"We expect these innovations to be introduced for power-hungry applications
such as EPS, EBS, climate control and electrically powered interior systems
such as power-windows, automatic door-closures etc," explains Mr. Natarajan.
The 48V power net is an enabler for applications that depend largely on an
electric motor as the power source. Not only will the proposed high-voltage