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Nascence of Printed Electronics Market Ensures Heated R&D Activity in Academic and Industry Platforms, Observes Frost & Sullivan

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3 Pages
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Nascence of Printed Electronics Market Ensures Heated R&D Activity in Academic and Industry Platforms, Observes Frost & Sullivan PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 21, 2012 - Advances in materials and equipment expand the application scope of printed electronics MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 21, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Printing techniques is an emerging market characterized by frenetic research and development (R&D) activities, as well as inking of numerous partnerships. Governments all over the world are lending their support to printed electronics (PE) by way of funding R&D efforts on techniques and processes, thereby encouraging more companies to enter the market. As printing methods are already well established and the technical expertise required for setting up business is low, this market is easily accessible to new entrants. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.technicalinsights.frost.com), Opportunities in Printed Electronics, finds that flexography, gravure, offset, inkjet, and screen-printing are the PE techniques currently in use. On the other hand, new technologies like atomic layer deposition and aerosol jet printing have a huge scope; with the right kind of effort, PE can be fine-tuned to achieve low costs and high volume production capacities. If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an email to Jeannette Garcia, Corporate Communications, at jeannette.garcia@frost.

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Nascence of Printed Electronics Market
Ensures Heated R&D Activity in Academic and
Industry Platforms, Observes Frost & Sullivan
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, June 21, 2012
- Advances in materials and equipment expand the application scope
of printed electronics
MOUNTAIN VIEW, California
,
June 21, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- Printing techniques
is an emerging market characterized by frenetic research and development
(R&D) activities, as well as inking of numerous partnerships. Governments all
over the world are lending their support to printed electronics (PE) by way of
funding R&D efforts on techniques and processes, thereby encouraging more
companies to enter the market. As printing methods are already well
established and the technical expertise required for setting up business is low,
this market is easily accessible to new entrants.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.technicalinsights.frost.com),
Opportunities in Printed Electronics
, finds that flexography, gravure,
offset, inkjet, and screen-printing are the PE techniques currently in use. On the
other hand, new technologies like atomic layer deposition and aerosol jet
printing have a huge scope; with the right kind of effort, PE can be fine-tuned to
achieve low costs and high volume production capacities.
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an
email to Jeannette Garcia, Corporate Communications, at
jeannette.garcia@frost.com, with your full name, company name, job title,
telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and
country.
"PE enables the use of flexible substrates, which lower production costs and
allows the fabrication of mechanically flexible circuits," says Technical Insights
Industry Analyst Saju John Mathew. "The choice of printing methods is
determined by requirements concerning printed layers, properties of printed
materials, as well as economic and technical considerations of printed
products."
Some factors that have popularized PE include its low-cost volume fabrication,
flexibility, transparency, reliability and environment friendliness.
Due to its high throughput and low manufacturing cost, PE has a quick time-to-
market turnaround. PE integrates the techniques and technology from printing,
electronics, material science and chemistry - especially organic and polymer
chemistry. Organic materials differ from conventional electronics in structure,
operation and functionality, which in turn influence the device, circuit design,
optimization, and fabrication method.
There is no one-size-fits-all solution. Rather, there are a variety of PE
technologies that are ensconced in their own niche sector based on their
attributes. Additionally, the industry's supply chain is missing an integrated
manufacturer that can link all the different components.
The materials involved in the manufacturing of PE possess diverse optical,