UK Survey Calls for Further Education to Help Eliminate Common Misconceptions About Psoriasis
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UK Survey Calls for Further Education to Help Eliminate Common Misconceptions About Psoriasis

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2 Pages
English

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UK Survey Calls for Further Education to Help Eliminate Common Misconceptions About Psoriasis PR Newswire LONDON, October 29, 2012 LONDON, October 29, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Over 80% of people surveyed recognised that psoriasis could have a huge psychological impact on quality of life However, nearly one third still wrongly believed psoriasis to be contagious, highlighting the vital need for education to reduce social stigma Following a brief education, over half of the respondents agreed they would react differently next time they saw someone with psoriasis symptoms [1],[ 2]Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects more than 125 million people around the globe. [1],[ 3]People living with psoriasis experience flare-ups of sore and itchy skin, but the psychological effects of psoriasis [4]-[6]can have an even greater impact on their everyday lives. [1],[ 2] A recent survey conducted amongst 1,036 members of the UK general public, highlighted that psoriasis is understood to have a large psychological impact, with 82% agreeing that it could have huge impact on quality of life. However, nearly one third still mistook psoriasis for a contagious condition. Such common misconceptions and a lack of empathy [7]can add greatly to the psychological burden of the disease. The Burden of Psoriasis patient research is one of the largest international studies to date investigating the impact that psoriasis has on people's lives.

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UK Survey Calls for Further Education to Help Eliminate
Common Misconceptions About Psoriasis
PR Newswire
LONDON, October 29, 2012
LONDON, October 29, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --
Over 80% of people surveyed recognised that psoriasis could have a huge psychological impact on
quality of life
However, nearly one third still wrongly believed psoriasis to be contagious, highlighting the vital need for
education to reduce social stigma
Following a brief education, over half of the respondents agreed they would react differently next time
they saw someone with psoriasis symptoms
[1],[ 2]Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects more than 125 million people around the globe.
[1],[ 3]People living with psoriasis experience flare-ups of sore and itchy skin, but the psychological effects of psoriasis
[4]-[6]can have an even greater impact on their everyday lives.
[1],[ 2]
A recent survey conducted amongst 1,036 members of the UK general public, highlighted that psoriasis is understood
to have a large psychological impact, with 82% agreeing that it could have huge impact on quality of life. However,
nearly one third still mistook psoriasis for a contagious condition. Such common misconceptions and a lack of empathy
[7]can add greatly to the psychological burden of the disease.
The Burden of Psoriasis patient research is one of the largest international studies to date investigating the impact that
psoriasis has on people's lives. Patients involved in the qualitative stage of the study reported reactions of disgust and
fear in response to their psoriasis, and their distress at having to cope with unnecessary comments, questions and
[8]staring.
"There is still a huge lack of understanding about psoriasis in the UK," commented Dr Anthony Bewley, Whipps Cross
University Hospital & Barts & the London NHS Trust, and Burden of Psoriasis patient research investigator. "We need
to educate the general public about the psychological impact of the disease as they can play such an important role
in helping to reduce the stigma associated with psoriasis."
Despite the recognition of the potential impact on quality of life, nearly 80% of people surveyed agreed that psoriasis is
still a greatly misunderstood condition and 78% agreed that society has an important role to play in reducing stigma.
How does psoriasis impact on quality of life?
Further analyses of the findings from the quantitative stage of Burden of Psoriasis patient research were presented at
stthe 21 EADV Congress in Prague, Czech Republic last month. The results showed that feelings of restriction,
isolation, stigmatisation and anxiety are all associated with a high impact of psoriasis on patients' quality of life; and are
[6]actually more important than diagnosed symptom severity.
Having learnt more about the everyday impact of psoriasis by reading a patient diary, over half of people questioned in
the survey agreed that if they suffered from psoriasis they would likely feel depressed (56%) or anxious about meeting
new people (58%).
After education, more than half of the survey respondents (53%) agreed that they would react differently next time they
saw someone with psoriasis.
What can we do to help?
The findings from the survey highlight the need to eliminate the misconceptions that taint people's perceptions of and
reactions to people with psoriasis. By spreading the word and supporting ongoing educational programmes and
awareness campaigns, we can all play our part in helping to improve the lives of people with psoriasis.
World Psoriasis Day, October 29, is an annual day specially dedicated to giving the more than 125 million people who
live with psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis an international voice. World Psoriasis Day is presented by IFPA, the International
Federation of Psoriasis Associations.
For more information about World Psoriasis Day and what you can do to help pleasevisit http://www.worldpsoriasisday.com
The Burden of Psoriasis patient research reiterates the importance of treating the psychological impact as well as the
physical symptoms of psoriasis. Dr Anthony Bewley emphasised, "A collaborative patient-healthcare professional
relationship is key to ensuring the most effective treatment and support programmes are being delivered. We need
to address the needs of individual patients, giving them the best chance of learning to overcome the impact
psoriasis has on their lives."
LEO Pharma is committed to delivering superior care solutions that empower people to better manage their skin
conditions and live confidently, and this means offering patients more than products. touch is a comprehensive patient
support service in the UK. It aims to address the issues that affect individual people, helping them to overcome the
impact that psoriasis has on their lives
For more information about t o u c h please visit h t t p : / / w w w . t o u c h p s o r i a s i s . c o . u k
This survey was supported by LEO Pharma A/S.
References
1. Basavaraj KH, Navya MA, Rashmi R. Stress and quality of life in psoriasis: an update. Int J Dermatol 2011;50:783-
92.
2. National Psoriasis Foundation. http://www.psoriasis.org/learn_statistics. Last accessed August 2012.
3. A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia. Psoriasis. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001470/. Last
accessed May 2012.
4. Hansen M, Bewley A, Ersser S, Ward C. Psoriasis treatment expectations and healthcare provider relationships for
patients in Europe, the USA and Canada. Dermatol Ther 2012(2);10:42 P095.
5. Rapp SR, Feldman SR, Exum ML, Fleischer AB, Jr., Reboussin DM. Psoriasis causes as much disability as other
major medical diseases. J Am Acad Dermatol 1999;41:401-7.
6. Bewley A, Ersser S, Hansen M, Pevac C. Psychosocial and symptomatic burden of psoriasis for patients in
Europe, the USA and Canada. Abstract presented at: EADV Congress, Prague, 27 - 30 September 2012 (ID number
PRA12-0920).
7. Hrehorow E, Salomon J, Matusiak L, Reich A, Szepietowski JC. Patients with psoriasis feel stigmatized. Acta
Derm Venereol 2011;92:67-72.
8. LEO Pharma data on file. Burden of psoriasis - patient research.