6 Pages
English

US Unmanned Aerial System Domestic Demand Falls: Suppliers Turn to Foreign Military and Commercial Markets

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Description

US Unmanned Aerial System DomesticUS Unmanned Aerial System Domestic Demand Falls: Suppliers Turn to Foreign Military and Commercial Markets PR Newswire MOUNTAIN VIEW, California, March 27, 2014 - Frost & Sullivan: As competition intensifies, companies that create efficient, persistent and survivable platforms will remain competitive Despite the withdrawal and reduction of troops from Iraq and Afghanistan, unmanned aerial systems (UASs) remain essential for conducting intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and strike operations. As Department of Defense (DoD) budgets for UASs decline, however, domestic UAS manufacturers must exploit opportunities in foreign military and the global commercial UAS market to stay afloat. New research from Frost & Sullivan's Analysis of the US DoD Unmanned Aerial Systems Market finds the market earned revenue of $4.97 billion in 2013 and estimates this to reach $6.53 billion in 2018. A large part of this increase is due to research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) funding for long range strike bombers. However, if budget constraints hit RDT&E funding, more reasonable revenue projections for 2018 represent an overall decreasing market at $3.7-4 billion. For complimentary access to more information on this research, visit: http://bit.ly/1dv6fG0. Besides shrinking DoD budgets, the high cost of developing new platforms is compelling several manufacturers to merely modify existing aircraft and subsystems.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 27 March 2014
Reads 2
Language English
US Unmanned Aerial System Domestic Demand Falls: Suppliers Turn to Foreign Military and Commercial Markets

PR Newswire

- Frost & Sullivan: As competition intensifies, companies that create efficient, persistent and survivable platforms will remain competitive

Despite the withdrawal and reduction of troops from Iraq and Afghanistan, unmanned aerial systems (UASs) remain essential for conducting intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and strike operations. As Department of Defense (DoD) budgets for UASs decline, however, domestic UAS manufacturers must exploit opportunities in foreign military and the global commercial UAS market to stay afloat.