Annexe 30 - Etude nationale Slovénie
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Annexe 30 - Etude nationale Slovénie

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37 Pages
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EVALUATION DES MESURES AGRO-ENVIRONNEMENTALES AGRI/ G4/ 2004 ANNEXE 30: ETUDE NATIONALE SLOVENIE Novembre 2005 Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. STATE OF THE AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT IN THE COUNTRY1 1.1 Brief description of the agriculture in the country.......................................................................... 1 1.2 Brief description of the environment in agriculture ....................................................................... 7 1.3 Brief presentation of the AE system in the country ...................................................................... 13 1.3.1 Description of the historic of implementation of AEM ................................................................. 13 1.3.2 Description of the portfolio of AEM in the country (main objectives of the AEM, possible zoning of intervention, etc.).................................................................................................................................... 16 1.3.3 List of the AEM ............................................................................................................................. 17 1.3.4 Organisation of the implementation at national and regional level ............................................... 18 1.3.5 Level of development of the good agricultural practice documentation.................................... ...

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       EVALUATION DES MESURES AGRO-ENVIRONNEMENTALES AGRI/ G4/ 2004  ANNEXE30: ETUDE NATIONALESLOVENIE  
Novembre 2005
Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
1.STATE OF THE AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT IN THE COUNTRY11.1Brief description of the agriculture in the country.......................................................................... 11.2Brief description of the environment in agriculture ....................................................................... 71.3Brief presentation of the AE system in the country ...................................................................... 131.3.1Description of the historic of implementation of AEM ................................................................. 131.3.2AEM in the country (main objectives of the AEM, possible zoningDescription of the portfolio of of intervention, etc.) .................................................................................................................................... 161.3.3 ............................................................................................................................. 17List of the AEM1.3.4Organisation of the implementation at national and regional level ............................................... 181.3.5Level of development of the good agricultural practice documentation........................................ 211.4The level of implementation of the measures................................................................................. 242.ANSWER TO EVALUATION QUESTIONS............................................................. 252.1.1Q 9: To what extent can the existing or planned institutional structures and working methods in the new Member States facilitate or hinder the construction of programmes and good quality agro-environmental measures? ............................................................................................................................ 252.1.2Q 10: To what extent is funding of the programme adequate as regards the EU contribution, Member State budget, regional budget? ..................................................................................................... 292.1.3Q 11: To what extent are the monitoring, evaluation and supervision of the agro-environmental measures in place in the Member States fit for the purpose? ...................................................................... 292.1.4Q 12: To what extent have the degree of application been influenced (or should be influenced) by other implementation factors or other relevant factors (such as the attitude towards the agro-environment, knowledge of the agro-environment at all levels within the Member State, the extent of GAPs, other CAP /EU measures, 5-year minimum contracts, limitation of beneficiaries to farmers only etc.) ............. 313.CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS........................................................... 33APPENDICES.......................................................................................................... 343.1 ............................................................................................................. 34Annex 1: List of people met3.2relation with the study including reports made priorAnnex 2: Main bibliography identified in to the EU membership .................................................................................................................................. 34TABLE OF TABLES Table 1.output in Slovenia in the period 1990-2000 (%). ................................. 4Structure of agricultural Table 2.Structure of livestock production in Slovenia. ............................................................................ 4Table 3.some staple Slovenian food items in years 1992, 1995-2000 (%).Table 3. : Self-sufficiency for  5Table 4.Consumption of fertilisers on UAA*in Slovenia......................................................................... 8Table 5.Consumption of plant protection products in Slovenia*............................................................ 11Table 6.Plant protection products - wholesale on Slovenian market (kg of active ingredient) in the period 2000-2002. .................................................................................................................................. 12Table 7.Slovene agri-environmental programme implemented in the period 2001-2003.. 15Measures of Table 8.Legislation referred to standards of good farming practice....................................................... 22Table 9.Number of agricultural holdings with approved measure in 2004. ........................................... 24
Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia TABLE OF FIGURES Figure 1.agricultural land use in Slovenia ............................................................................. 2Structure of Figure 2.Consumption of nutrients from mineral fertilisers (kg/ha agricultural land) in Slovenia in the period 1939-2000. .................................................................................................................................... 8Figure 3. 9Consumption of mineral fertilisers (kg/ha) in Slovenia in the period 1990-2002 .......................Figure 4. 11 ...................................Consumption of plant protection products on family farms in SloveniaGLOSSARY AAMRD Agency of the Republic of Slovenia for Agricultural Markets and Rural DevelopmentA-E Agri-environmental CAP Common Agriculture Policy ca Circa (about) c.c. Cadastral community EAGGF European Agricultural Guidance and Guarantee Fund EARS Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia ECU European Currency Unit EU European Union EUR/SIT Exchange rate (EURO/Slovenian tolar) EUR,  Euro EUROSTAT Statistical Office of the European Communities GDP Gross domestic product ha Hectare IACS Integrated administration and control system k Kilo (1000 times) kg Kilogram LFA, LFAs Less favoured areas LU Livestock unit MAFF Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food MESPE Ministry of the Environment, Spatial Planning and Energy NEPP National Environmental Protection Programme NGO Non-governmental organisation RDP Rural Development Plan RS Republic of Slovenia SAPARD Special Action for Pre-accession Measures for Agriculture and Rural DevelopmentSIFP (SIPS) Slovenian integrated fruit production (Slovenska integrirana pridelava sadja) SI, SLO Slovenia SIT Slovenian Tolar SORS Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia SPA Special protection areas STAR Committee Committee on Agricultural Structures and Rural Development t ton (1000 kg) UAA Utilised agricultural area
Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
1. STATE OF THE AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT IN THE COUNTRY
1.1 description of the agriculture in the countryBrief Due to varied climatic, geological and morphological soil conditions, a considerable share of agricultural land in Slovenia is situated in the LFAs. While unfavourable conditions for production do not completely hinder farming, they are a cause of the lower production capacity of farms, the narrower selection of cultures and production orientations, and costlier production. Mountain farms are less competitive and, because of specific natural conditions reflected in the structure of agricultural land use, also less adaptable. Despite lower production potentials these areas nevertheless play a significant role in the preservation of the rural population and the cultural landscape, and in the maintenance of the ecological balance. Beside some historical and political reasons the structure of land use is most directly influenced by natural conditions. It has to be emphasized that in this respect Slovenia deviates to a great extent from the European average. This is especially true for Central Europe where there is not a country that would dispose of such a great share of forests in the structure of land use - in the late eighties the share of forests has exceeded one half and, according to the latest data, it is almost 60% at the moment. In the abundance of forests in Europe, Slovenia is surpassed only by the two Scandinavian countries, Finland and Sweden. According to the latest available land use database (2002), slightly less than 33% of the national territory, i.e., 663,000 ha, is characterised as agricultural land. Forests cover 59% of the surface area, or 1.2 million hectares and are a very important natural resource. Such an abundance of forests does not prevent the agricultural production directly, it indicates, however, that a great part of land in Slovenia is unsuitable for cultivation. At the same time, it has to be emphasized that, due to typical fragmented settlement and way of land use, the agricultural area in Slovenia is especially susceptible to spreading of forests. While in the majority of other countries the forest is spreading slowly towards the agricultural area, in Slovenia the process is much more rapid and aggressive. One of the most characteristic consequences of specific natural conditions suitable for agricultural production in Slovenia is the great share of absolute grassland (meadows and pastures) and a relatively small share of fields and permanent plantations (orchards and vineyards) in the structure of agricultural land use.
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Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
Figure 1. Structure of agricultural land use in Slovenia
Extensive meadows 30.6%
Intensive meadows 26%
Arable land 34.8%
Hop fields 0.4% Vineyards 4% Orchards Olive groves 4% 0.2% Source: Land use database, MAFF, 2002 With the exception of the part of Sub-Pannonian plain in the north-east and smaller closed areas situated at the bottom of basins and valleys, Slovenia disposes of no important areas suitable for intensive field crop production. The fields are thus limited to relatively small area, which is additionally threatened by urbanization. With the exception of Ireland there is not a country in Europe with a smaller share of fields in the structure of agricultural land use than Slovenia. With 0.12 ha of fields per capita Slovenia is far behind the European average in having, for instance, almost 3 times less fields per capita than the average presented by other countries, members of CEFTA. The absolute predomination of grassland in the Slovenian agriculture is evident by the fact that it covers more than two thirds of agricultural land. This is almost two times the EU average where only Ireland has a greater share of grassland in the structure of land use. In spite of its great share grassland is characterised by low exploitation rate. Good two thirds of grassland is used as meadows and just under one third as extensive pastures. Due to its geographic position, which is partly Sub-Mediterranean and partly Sub-Pannonian, the share of agricultural land suitable for permanent plantations in Slovenia is relatively high. Slovenia has the same surface area of permanent plantations as EU. Different natural conditions (humid climate, mountainous landforms, karst and poorer soils) have a great influence on the land use in Slovenia nowadays. But over the past hundred years the socio-economic and agro-political conditions have also contributed a great deal to the changes of agricultural land use: abandoning of agricultural activities with depopulation, industrialization, introduction of market oriented farming, different land use in the socialist period, etc. The results of these processes were manifested in the reduced areas of arable lands and gardens and vineyards. Fields were abandoned in the mountainous areas as well as in the lowland areas of eastern Slovenia, which is far less desirable. Restructuring was made in favour of meadows; it is also true that numerous areas of arable land were built upon. The vineyard areas were mostly concentrated in the typical vine-growing regions while vineyards on the climatically less favourable locations were abandoned. The spreading of grass areas was, to a larger extent, the result of conscious reorientation of Slovenian farming from the former self-subsistence and autarkic (wheat based) farming to livestock rearing, for which the natural conditions in Slovenia 2
Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
are suitable. It is typical that also the Sub-Pannonian Slovenia was included in this process, even though the natural conditions there are favourable for crop farming activities. The fact is that the agricultural land area in Slovenia is decreasing rather quickly and that the relation between particular forms of its use keeps changing all the time. Statistical data on agricultural land are relatively unreliable and it is estimated that the decrease of the entire area of agricultural land is actually going on even more rapidly. Mainly the following three processes influence this: - abandoning of production on certain marginal land areas and on those with marginal profitability and their gradual overgrowing, - urbanization together with the building of infrastructure by taking away the most qualitative arable land from agriculture, - grass over fields, even on the most favourable locations in view of crop farming.spreading of Mainly the first two processes influence the entire volume of agricultural land, as they are the actual reason for the loss of production potential of agriculture. Given that the natural and structural conditions dictate the structure of agricultural production in Slovenia, animal husbandry is prevailing with more than 60% of GAO, followed by crop production at 34%. Fruit and wine production also represent a significant part of agricultural output (about 12% of GAO). The volume and structure of crop production is largely oriented towards the provision of inputs of animal production - forage crops represent slightly less than half of the aggregate crop output. The prevalent crop is maize, spanning on about 40% of arable land, followed by cereals (20% of arable land) and potato (10% of arable land). A significant share of crop production is attributed also to sugar beet and hops, the latter being traditionally export-oriented. The intensity of production is constantly increasing, although the average harvests still lag behind the corresponding EU rates. The volume of fruit production is subject to large annual fluctuations, mainly due to differing climatic conditions. The variety of natural conditions enables production of various types of fruit, however apples are prevailing in the production structure, by a large followed by pears, peaches, sour cherries and cherries. Annual fluctuations can be perceived also in wine production, although a trend of gradual growth can be detected. In the structure of animal production, cattle breeding, mostly combined milk and meat production is prevailing. It is followed by pig and poultry production. Recently, sheep and goat breeding is steadily increasing. Significant changes can be perceived especially in poultry production, where a significant drop has occurred, mainly due to the loss of former Yugoslav markets. Negative trends can be observed also in cattle production, where the absolute number of livestock has fallen. The intensity of production has nevertheless increased, which resulted in a slight increase of the aggregate level of production. Pig production reveals some typical fluctuations with a slight downward trend.
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Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia Table 1. Structure of agricultural output in Slovenia in the period 1990-2000 (%).  1990 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Total Agricultural Output 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Plant production 47.0 44.3 42.1 44.4 42.5 39.7 38.7 Arable crops 39.2 35.8 30.2 32.3 31.2 30.3 26.8 - Cereals 7.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 6.8 7.5 - Industrial plants 2.2 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.3 3.4 2.4 - Vegetables 15.2 9.5 8.7 8.4 5.5 6.0 6.1 - Fodder crops 6.1 3.9 1.6 3.2 4.0 3.8 2.6 - Green forage crops 8.3 11.0 8.2 8.7 9.3 10.3 8.1 Fresh fruits 3.7 4.7 5.8 3.2 4.1 4.1 6.0 Grape 4.1 3.8 6.1 8.9 7.2 5.4 5.9 Animal production 52.9 55.7 57.9 55.6 57.5 60.3 61.3 - Cattle and milk 25.5 31.9 32.7 30.1 31.3 34.7 36.7 - Pigs 11.5 12.2 11.8 11.8 11.7 12.3 11.2 - Sheep, milk and wool 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.9 - Poultry and eggs 15.8 11.2 12.7 12.9 13.5 12.3 11.9 - Honey 0.0 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.4 0.6 Source: SORS and Agricultural Institute of Slovenia Due to natural conditions aiming at the use of agricultural land mainly in the form of grassland, livestock production is nevertheless the central line of Slovenian agriculture. The share of livestock production in the gross value of agricultural production in Slovenia is more than 50%. More than 70% of all animals in Slovenia belong to cattle. In EU only France, Ireland and Luxembourg have a greater number of cattle in the livestock structure than Slovenia. The proportion is inverse in pig breeding and above all in sheep and goats where Slovenia has, in spite of favourable conditions for breeding, a completely negligible share in the structure of LU. The intensity of livestock production measured by LU number per hectare of agricultural land in Slovenia has increased in the past period in spite of absolute decrease of number of animals. Despite the fact that it does not reach the level of the countries with the most developed livestock production (Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark), it has approached the EU average. Table 2. Structure of livestock production in Slovenia.  Slovenia EU-15 LU (000) 479 115,380 Structure of LU (%) - cattle 76.7 52.3 - pigs 12.7 24.4 - others (sheep, goats, horses) 10.6 23.3 Average number of LU per ha of agricultural land 0.85 0.90 Source : Eurostat, SORS, 2000 The number of LU per hectare of agricultural land is also an important ecological measure. In this aspect, agriculture in some regions in Slovenia (hilly, mountainous, Karst) has a great developmental opportunity for environmentally sound farming practices due to a small pressure on the environment. Slovenias share in international trade of agricultural products is practically negligible. The foreign agri-food trade balance is traditionally negative. Agricultural trading represents around 4% of all Slovenian exports and 8.5% of total Slovenian imports. The agri-food trade balance worsened throughout the transitional period. In 1996, for the first time, the export of agricultural products 4
Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia increased (by 3.5%), and imports decreased (by 3.1%). The latest available data reveal that the proportion of exports to imports reaches 49%. This share is significantly lower than the average export/import ratio in Slovenian foreign trade in general (90%). Slovenia has surpluses in poultry products and milk, some significance in the export structure being attributed also to some processed products (beef, meat products, quality wine, beer). At the same time, the bulk of Slovenian imports are attributed to cereals, sugar, oil and pig meat. The main foreign markets for Slovenian agriculture are still the former Yugoslav republics, which are the destination of more than half of the value of the entire exports of agricultural products. The EU, which unlike Slovenia has an extremely balanced foreign-trade balance, is Slovenias main import partner since imports from EU countries have been constantly increasing, and now amount to over 50%. Table 3.  Self-sufficiency for some staple Slovenian food items in years 1992, :Table 3. 1995-2000 (%). Product* 1992 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Cereals, total 37 50 50 55 57 48 48 - wheat 43 56 52 44 54 41 63 - maize 36 54 55 67 69 58 47 Sugar 46 57 60 63 62 87 57 Fresh potatoes 101 97 96 100 95 95 -Vegetables 73 79 71 72 69 - -Fruits 74 70 69 53 59 58 -Wine 83 73 95 82 105 93 -Meat, total 104 94 96 95 94 95 -- beef 101 88 94 102 98 97 96 pig 78 78 83 77 77 82 76 -- poultry 164 134 121 114 112 114 111 Eggs 115 109 107 106 100 99 -Milk 122 115 115 113 120 123 -*: Share of domestic production in domestic consumption Source: SORS and Agricultural Institute of Slovenia The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food performs tasks in the fields of agriculture, rural development, food, fodder, plant protection, veterinary medicine, zootechnics, forestry, hunting and fisheries. The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food encompasses the following institutions: Agency of the RS for Agricultural Markets and Rural Development The purpose of the Agency is to implement the EU programme of pre-accession aid in agriculture (SAPARD), and the programme of Slovenian agricultural policy reform, and to adjust the common agricultural policy of the European Union. It also carries out measures of the agricultural market and prices and structural policy, gathers and manages databases, promotes agricultural products etc. Moreover, the Agency performs work relating to applying measures and tasks in the area of agriculture, forestry, food and fishery in line with the common agricultural and fisheries policies of the European Union, and other tasks involving implementation of agricultural policy reform. Veterinary Administration The Administration was founded in order to perform administrative tasks and inspections in the area of veterinary medicine. Taking into account its areas of work, the Veterinary Administration consists of: the administrative part, which performs tasks from the areas of registration of medicinal products, reproduction of domestic animals, requirements for the sanitation of foodstuffs, epizootiology, protection of animals from cruelty, and issues certificates and import licences 5
Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
the inspection part: Veterinary Inspection, which carries out inspections within Slovenia, and Border Veterinary Inspection, which performs inspections at border crossings. Inspectorate for Agriculture, Forestry, Hunting and Fisheries It was established to oversee implementation of the laws, regulations and acts relating to the working area of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food. It is engaged with adoption of acquis communautaire concerning the control and monitoring procedures (Common Agricultural Policy, Border Inspection Posts, Harmful organisms, agricultural and forestry propagative materials, quotas in fisheries, Food Safety Strategy). The Inspectorate is organised in four inspection services: - The Agricultural Inspection Service, - The Phytosanitary Inspection Service, - The Forestry Inspection Service, and - The Hunting and Fisheries Inspection Service. Inspectorate of the RS for Quality Control of Agricultural Products and Foodstuffs The Inspectorate exercises supervision of the implementation of acts and other regulations governing the quality control of fodder and agricultural products and foodstuffs in production, processing, transport and in the choice of customs procedures for the release of goods in free trade and customs procedure for exporting agricultural products and foodstuffs. The Inspectorate also supervises implementation of regulations in the field of customer protection, fulfilment of technical demands for products, and their satisfaction of the requisite standards. Administration of the RS for Plant Protection and Seeds It is the central body responsible for plant health, registration of plant protection products, protection and registration of new plant varieties in the Republic of Slovenia, co-ordination and exchange of information between the bodies and public services, co-operation at the international level, and reporting to the European Commission. The Administration performs administrative and expert tasks relating to: measures and obligations in connection with the occurrence, prevention of the introduction and spread, and eradication of harmful organisms on plants, plant products and regulated objects; registration of producers, importers and distributors of certain plants; the plant passport system; biological control; registration, transport and use of plant protection products; technical requirements for plant protection products application devices; registration of plant varieties, protection of new varieties and the acquisition and care for breeding rights; establishment and management of the information system; operation of public services; and authorised organisations in the working field. Office of the RS for the Recognition of Agricultural Product and Foodstuff Designation It was founded to implement legislation in the sphere of quality policy. It performs the following tasks: it leads procedures for recognising indications of higher quality of agricultural products or foodstuffs, indications of the geographical designation of agricultural products or foodstuffs, indications of natural mineral waters, indications of the traditional reputation of agricultural products and foodstuffs, leads procedures for the assignment of protection indications, keeps a record of producers and processors using these indications, keeps a consolidated record of producers and processors of ecological or integrated agricultural products or foodstuffs, co-operates with the authorised offices in other countries, and monitors the use of indications for agricultural products and foodstuffs according to the scope of production and processing. EU accession negotiations in the field of agriculture, which started in 1998 with a one-year long screening of Slovenian legislations alignment with European laws, and continued with the preparation of the negotiating position for Chapter 7 - Agriculture and several additional clarifications thereto, were finally concluded in December 2002. The process of negotiations related to the three parts:
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Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
- Implementation part referring to Slovenias obligations regarding adoption of the acquis until accession; - Requests regarding transition periods and derogations; - Financial framework, including quotas and reference quantities, the level and way of paying  directs payments and funds for rural development; - almost all legal acts (the remaining ones are in theAdoption of acquis: Slovenia has adopted final stages of adoption) and most implementing regulations whereby its legal order is aligned with that of the EU. - Policy alignment: On the basis of the adopted Agricultural Policy Reform Slovenia has been implementing for the fourth year the measures of agricultural policy that are comparable in content with EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Due to the introduction of direct payments comparable to those in the EU, budgetary expenses for agriculture have more than doubled in the past five years. - has set up and is providing training for adoption andInstitution alignment: Slovenia implementation of the acquis to all necessary institutions. The Slovenian Agency for Agricultural Markets and Rural Development, which is already carrying out SAPARD and national agricultural policy measures, is being trained to implement the CAP measures after accession. The final stage of a conferral of the national accreditation of the paying agency for the standard CAP measures is under way. IACS system has been developed and has also been used for national direct payments. Slovenia has just a few transitional periods and derogations from the European legal order which shows a high level of alignment with the acquis. The level of negotiated quotas and reference quantities seem to be adequate enough for the survival and possible development of the main lines of agricultural production. Slovenia places a high emphasis on the so-called second pillar of the CAP, which is rural development. In this respect we are already now in the line with the main orientation of the CAP regarding modulation and the importance given to the rural development measures. Since May 2003 Slovenia actively participates as an observer at practically all important meeting of the Council of agricultural ministers, Special Committee for Agriculture, management committees, working parties etc. In various respects it can already be said that the EU membership has already started well before the official data of the accession to the EU. 1.2 Brief description of the environment in agriculture In Slovenia average nutrient consumption from mineral fertilisers reaches 70 kg/ha N, 38 kg/ha P2O5 47 kg/ha K and2O (1939-2000) and is amounted to 155 kg/ha, which slightly exceeds the average in EU-15 (124 kg/ha). Consumption of mineral fertilisers has decreased in the last 5 years and amounted to 176,955 t in 2002. In 2000 consumption of mineral fertilisers amounted to 174,620 t, containing 75,000 t of plant nutrients. Hectare of arable land was fertilised with 397 kg of mineral fertilisers (171 kg of plant nutrients) in average. Taking into account the data on UAA, 337 kg of mineral fertilisers were used per hectare (146 kg of plant nutrients). The quantity of products used on family farms amounted to 359 kg/ha, while agricultural enterprises used 911 kg/ha. In 2000 the use of plant nutrients (N, P2O5in K2O) per ha of arable land amounted to 148 kg/ha and placed Slovenia among smaller consumers in Europe. Agricultural land areas were fertilised with 68 kg N/ha, 36 kg P2O5/ha and 43 kg K2O/ha. As shown from the data, nitrogen nutrients with 45% of all inputs, prevail. Since 1990 the quantity of N used has increased from 27,169 t to 34,847 t, however it has stabilized in the recent years. In spite of different measures, this stabilization has not proved to be steady yet.
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Evaluation of agri-environmental measures - Slovenia
Figure 2. Consumption of nutrients from mineral fertilisers (kg/ha agricultural land) in Slovenia in the period 1939-2000.
Source: State of the Environment - Report, Government of the Republic of Slovenia - MESPE, 2002 Table 4. Consumption of fertilisers on UAA*in Slovenia. Unit 1990 1995 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Total Fertilisers t 149,67 171,389 180,707 184,892 18,6569 174,620 178,639 176,955 7 Consumption kg 229 388 440 451 424 397 412 407 per ha of UAA Plant nutrient:  N t 27,169 32,508 34,102 34,813 34,392 34,847 34,771 33,415  P2O5 17,851 17,534 18,784 19,751 18,375 16,685 15,795 t 14,870  K2 15,878O t 22,343 22,992 24,451 22,135 21,012 20,755 21,705 Of these on family farms** Fertilisers t 105,53 143,667 145,336 154,470 160,102 147,622 149,621 152,191 6 Consumption kg 183 354 383 411 392 359 370 376 per ha of UAA  N  P2O5 K2O
Plant nutrient: t 19,433 27,112 27,764 29,282 29,682 29,627 29,364 28,930 t 9,906 15,148 13,770 15,602 16,867 15,849 13,986 13,448 t 10,359 18,277 17,283 18,610 20,508 18,793 17,287 17,466 * In this case the UAA without extensive rough grazing and common pastures. ** Available mineral fertilisers. Source: SORS
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