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The Games may never be safe again but they must go on The Observer July

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Bac 97 GRP 1 ES I) COMPREHENSION The Games may never be safe again, but they must go on The Observer, 28 July 1996 I just froze and felt sick. I knew exactly what it was all about. The immediate memory was Munich. I wasn't there, but for those who were it must have brought back a nightmare. There may have been a difference from Atlanta, but the end result was the same : an unspeakable act of barbarity. In 1972, of course, the Games were selectively targeted ; a by-product of an Arab-Israeli conflict. We don't know yet what was behind this, but ultimately there's no difference in the overall horror. You can't switch on your TV without recognising that Centennial Park has become a symbol for the city's celebration of the Games. It's where the partying goes on, so whoever planted the bomb knew they were likely to inflict massive injury. It wasn't an economic target. The bombers didn't pick an empty broadcast centre or go for the rapid transport system. They actually picked a place where they knew that the people there would have had absolutely no interest or involvement with their cause. Of course, there are many who will say that sport is not worth the spilling of anyone's blood, and that these Olympics should have been abandoned there and then.

  • perhaps there

  • raid

  • part au mouvement olympique

  • steamed up

  • most appropriate

  • his mother

  • competence linguistique

  • global comprehension

  • air-raid siren


Subjects

Informations

Published by
Reads 377
Language English

Bac 97
GRP 1 ES

I) COMPREHENSION

The Games may never be safe again, but they must go on


The Observer, 28 July 1996 We all know the Games are no longer just about
sport. They are about commercialism, politics, ego,
I just froze and felt sick. I knew exactly what it was many things - but essentially they are about youth.
all about. The immediate memory was Munich. I wasn't Only the other day, I went to Gatwick to see off 18
there, but for those who were it must have brought back youngsters from all over the United Kingdom who
a nightmare. were going to attend an Olympic youth camp in
There may have been a difference from Atlanta, but Atlanta. They were going not to compete, but to enjoy
the end result was the same : an unspeakable act of themselves as part of the Olympic movement.
barbarity. In 1972, of course, the Games were These are the sort of young people who could have
selectively targeted ; a by-product of an Arab-Israeli ended up as the victims of a misguided political
conflict. We don't know yet what was behind this, but message.
ultimately there's no difference in the overall horror. We tend to forget the Olympics have often been
You can't switch on your TV without recognising used as a political platform, whether for Nazism in
that Centennial Park has become a symbol for the city's 1936 or the African boycott in 1976.
celebration of the Games. It's where the partying goes Now this is the second occasion when they have
on, so whoever planted the bomb knew they were likely spilled over into ghastly tragedy. As a human being, a
to inflict massive injury. politician and a former Olympian I am saddened and
It wasn't an economic target. The bombers didn't appalled.
pick an empty broadcast centre or go for the rapid It would be hard for something as large as the
transport system. They actually picked a place where Olympics to avoid being a target for cranks, extremists
they knew that the people there would have had and terrorists, but if you decided to do away with it
absolutely no interest or involvement with their cause. because of such threats, you would also have to scrap
Of course, there are many who will say that sport is the World Cup and other major global gatherings.
not worth the spilling of anyone's blood, and that these These people are not respecters of ethos, philosophy
Olympics should have been abandoned there and then. or tradition. To them nothing is sacred. They just
I do not agree. They went ahead in Munich and it is cynically target something they know is going to give
right that they do so now, because you cannot concede them wall-to-wall publicity for their acts of horror.
to terrorism or blackmail. Sebastian Coe won gold medals in the 1500 metres
If you do, then you admit these people have the in the Moscow and Los Angeles Olympics. He is now
ability to derail something which, for all its Tory MP for Falmouth and Camborne.
imperfections, has a massive ability to unify.

(1.35) a crank : a mad person


a) Global Comprehension

1) Who is the narrator ?
Name :
Present occupation :

2) What tragic event does the article refer to ?

3) Say precisely where it took place

Say when it took place

4) Why was this place chosen ? Justify by quoting the text.
b) Detailed Comprehension

1) Pick out at least four expressions in the text showing that the narrator was deeply shocked by the event.

2) pick out three sentences or groups of words showing that the event is unforgivable.

3) Why does the narrator take such an interest in the event ?

4) Say whether the following statements are true or false and justify with a quotation from the text.

a) After the tragic event, nobody wanted the games to stop

b) The narrator thought it was necessary for the games to go on.

c) He thinks it's always safer to accept terrorists' demands

5) Find in the text the sentence that refers to the old spirit of the Olympic Games

6) Show that the Olympic Games have now lost their initial purpose. Quote one sentence from the text.

7) The author refers to three events proving the presence of politics in the Olympic Games. Which ones ?

8) Among the following adjectives, circle those which best qualify terrorists. For each adjective chosen, justify
with one quotation.

- Cruel : - Dedicated : - Compassionate :
- Longing for fame : - Willing to help : - Disrespectful :

9) Would you say this article is
- a cry of alarm ? - a hopeful vision of sport ? - a message of peace ?
Choose the most appropriate statement and briefly justify you choice in your own words.

10) Translate into French from 1.24 ('Only the other day...) down to 1.28 (..Olympic movement')


II) COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE

1. Without changing their meaning, rephrase the following sentences using modals.
a. People probably felt horrified at that tragic event.
People...

b. It is impossible that the Olympic Games should go on like this.
The Olympic Games...

c. Perhaps there were more spectators in Atlanta than in Munich.
There...

d. The author is sorry that there weren't enough policemen on the spot.
The author thinks there...

e. It isn't necessary for the organisers to postpone the Games.
The organisers...

2. Turn the following sentences into the passive (expressing the agent only when necessary)

a. People say the Olympic Games are dangerous...

b. Someone planted the bomb just before midnight.
... c. They had to take many victims to hospital.
...
d. Doctors have given the victims much psychological help.
(Give two possible sentences.)
-...
-...
e. In the future, people won't look at the Olympic Games in the same way.
...

3. Use the prompts to rephrase the following sentences without changing their meaning.
a. The author is sorry the terrorists spoilt the Olympic Games.
He wishes...

b. It is the English youngsters' first trip to the United States.
It's the first time...

c. The terrorists wanted everybody to speak about them.
They made...

d. Most athletes don't usually take drugs.
Most athletes aren't used...

4. Translate into English

a. Cet athlète s'entraîne depuis cinq ans.
...
b. Le public reproche aux athlètes de gagner trop d'argent.
...
c. Au lieu de se lamenter, les organisateurs feraient mieux de réagir.
...
d. Si elle était restée à Atlanta, elle aurait assisté aux Jeux Olympiques.
...

COMPREHENSION : CORRIGE

a) Global Comprehension

1) Who is the narrator ?
Name : Sebastian Coe
Present occupation : Tory MP for Falmouth and Camborne
2) What tragic event does the article refer to ?
It refers to the bomb that exploded during the 1996 Olympics

3) Say precisely where it took place
It took place in Centennial Park, Atlanta
Say when it took place : July 1996

4) Why was this place chosen ? Justify by quoting the text
"It's where the partying goes on, so whoever planted the bomb knew they were likely to inflict massive injury" (L.
9 10 11)

b) Detailed Comprehension
1) pick out at least four expressions in the text showing that the narrator was deeply shocked by the event
- I just froze (L.1) - (I) felt sick (L.1) - I am saddened (L. 32) - (I am) appalled (L. 33)

2) Pick out three sentences or groups of words showing that the event is unforgivable
- "an unspeakable act of barbarity" (L.5) - "ghastly tragedy" (L. 31/32) - "acts of horror" (L. 40)
3) Why does the narrator take such an interest in the event ?
He's a former Olympian who's taken part in the Olympics twice
4) Say whether the following statements are true or false and justify with a quotation from the text
a) After the tragic event, nobody wanted the games to stop (False)
F - "sport is not worth the spilling of anyone's blood..., these Olympics should have been abandoned" (L. 16 à 18)

b) The narrator thought it was necessary for the games to go on.
T - "They went ahead in Munich and it is right (true) that they do so now" (L. 18 et 19)

c) He thinks it's always safer to accept terrorists' demands (False)
F - "To them nothing is sacred" (L. 38/39)

5) Find in the text the sentence that refers to the old spirit of the Olympic Games
"has a massive ability to unify" (L.21)

6) Show that the Olympic Games have now lost their initial purpose. Quote one sentence from the text.
"They are about commercialism, politics, ego, many things" (L. 22/23)

7) The author refers to three events proving the presence of politics in the Olympic Games. Which ones ?
He refers to the Arab-Israeli conflict (L. 6), Nazism (/. 3O) and the African boycott (L. 3O)

8) Among the following adjectives, circle those which best qualify terrorists. For each adjective chosen, justify
with one quotation.
1 - Cruel : "act of barbarity" (L.5)
2 - Dedicated :
3 - Compassionate :
4 - Longing for fame : "wall-to-wall publicity" (L. 4O)
5 - Willing to help :
6 - Disrespectful : "not respecters of ethos" (L. 38)

9) Would you say this article is
- a cry of alarm ?
- a hopeful vision of sport ?
- a message of peace ?
Choose the most appropriate statement and briefly justify you choice in your own words.

According to me, this article is a message of peace. Sebastian Coe reminds us that sport should be equated with
peace and not with war, although the original message inherent in the Olympics has repeatedly been distorted.

10) Translate into French from 1.24 ('Only the other day...) down to 1.28 (...Olympic movement').

Il y a quelques jours à peine, je suis allé à l'aéroport de Gatwick pour accompagner dix huit jeunes en provenance
de tout le Royaume-Uni. Ils se rendaient à Atlanta, dans un centre d'accueil olympique destiné à la jeunesse. Ils
n'allaient pas concourir, mais prendre part au mouvement olympique tout en s'amusant.




COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE : Pas de corrigé disponible










GRP 1 L

Almost the first thing he could remember was his mother standing on a stool in the kitchen, piling tins of
food into the top cupboard. On the table there were more tins : pineapple, little oranges - you could tell by the
pictures. He asked her :
- what are all those tins for ?
The sun was shining through the kitchen window behind her head, and though he screwed up his eyes against
the dazzle he couldn't see her face properly, but he remembered her looking down at him for what seemed a long
time before she said :
- Because there's a war, dear.
- What's a war ? he asked. But he could never remember what she answered.
Soon he found out that war was a Mickey Mouse gas-mask that steamed up when you breathed and his father
getting a tin hat and a whistle and Jill crying because her Dad was going away to join the Air Force and the
wireless on all the time and black paper stuck over the front-door windows and sirens going and getting up in the
middle of the night because of the raids. It was fun getting up in the middle of the night.
They didn't have their own shelter. He and his mother went up the road, to Jill's house, number 64, which had
a shelter in the back garden. Jill's Dad had made it himself.
His own Dad was usually on duty during an air raid, he was a Warden, making sure everybody was in a
shelter, and not letting any lights show through their curtains. If the German planes saw a light shining through
your curtains they would know where you were and they would drop a bomb on you. Sometimes in the middle of a
raid his father would call in at number 64 and come down to the shelter to see that they were all right. Or he would
come and fetch them after the All Clear had sounded. Sometimes he would carry Timothy home asleep, and he
would wake up in the morning in his own bed without having heard the All Clear.
The All-Clear siren was all the same noise, but the Air-Raid siren was up and down, uhhhERRR...
uhhhERRR...uhhhERRR... It was clever to have two different sirens that sounded like what they meant. The All
Clear was a tired, safe sound, like you felt going home, yawning, after a raid, but the Air-Raid siren sounded
frightened.
Not that Timothy was frightened. After a while he got so used to the Air-Raid sirens that his mother had to
wake him to go up the road to Jill's before the German bombers came over. Jill was the same age as he was, five,
but he was older because his birthday came first.
Jill was pretty. He was going to marry her when they were grown up. His sister Kath was much older than he
was, sixteen, almost grown up, but she wasn't living at home any more. She had gone away to the country, with the
nuns. Kath's school had gone away because of the raids. The raids were because of the War. They were called the
Blitz. His mother said that if the Blitz went on much longer she would take Timothy to live in the country too. They
lived in London, which was the biggest city in the whole world. Timothy didn't want to go and live in the country.
He had been there once and stung himself on some nettles and fell into a cow's business.
But he didn't want the raids to stop either, because it was fun getting up in the middle of the night.

David Lodge
Out of the Shelter

I) COMPREHENSION - COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE - EXPRESSION :

1) Which war is it ? Find 4 elements in the text to support your answer.

2) a) How many characters are mentioned in the text ?
b) What is the relationship between them ?
c) What did the two fathers do in the war ?
d) Say in your own words why Kath did not live with them.

3) a) What was Timothy's first recollection of the war ? (in your own words)
b) What did his father get a tin hat and a whistle for ?
c) What were they always listening to ? Why ?
d) Why were the front-door windows stuck over with black paper ?

4) The sentence : "It was fun getting up in the middle of the night" (l.14) is repeated at the end of the text (l.40) :
a) What does this repetition reveal about the way Timothy considered the war ?
b) Would you say the adults shared Timothy's impressions ? Justify your answer (about 40 words.) 5) Read the last paragraph carefully.
Whose point of view is mostly expressed in these lines ?
What do you think of the style chosen by the writer ? (about 50 words.)

6) "The All Clear was a tired, safe sound, like you felt going home, yawning, after a raid, but the Air-Raid Siren
sounded frightened". (l.26-28)
a) Underline the adjectives in the sentence.
b) Explain the author's intention in choosing these adjectives.

7) Compare the different uses of WOULD in the following sentences :
A) "If the German planes saw a light shining through your curtains they WOULD know where you were and
they WOULD drop a bomb on you." (l.18-20)

B) "Sometimes he WOULD carry Timothy home asleep, and he WOULD wake up in the morning in his own
bed without having heard the All Clear". (l.22-24)

What do they express ?

8) Choose one of following subjects. (about 250 words.)
a) Do you think that the world of adults should be kept unrevealed to children ?
Justify your point.

b) Kath is writing to her parents about her experiences away from home in the country.

COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE

II. VERSION

Translate into French from line 10 (Soon he found out) down to line 14 (the middle of the night).
... CORRIGE COMPREHENSION - COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE

1) It was the second World War, because of the references to the Air Force (l.12), the wireless (l.12), the air raids
(l.14, 17, 24) and the German bombers (l.30,31)

2) a) Six characters are mentioned in the text.
b) Timothy, the narrator, his parents, his sister Kath. Jill, the five-year old neighbour and her father.
c) Jill's father has joined the Air Force. Timothy's father was a Warden.
d) She had gone to the country with the nuns in order to escape the war. She was a refugee.

3) a) His first memory of the war was associated with the tins of food his mother kept storing away.
b) He had a tin hat in order to protect his head and a whistle to warn people against the danger.
c) They were always listening to the wireless to get the latest news.
d) If any light filtered through the windows, it would attract the Germans' attention and they could aim at your
house.

4) a) The memories of the war are filtered through the child's eyes.It was a lot of fun for him.
b) Of course, the adults are aware of the danger and do not share Timothy's carefree vision. His father is worried
about his family when he is on duty and Timothy's mum contemplates going away to the country.

5) Timothy's point of view prevails in this last paragraph. The style chosen by the writer matches the child's vision.
The words used are quite simple. The use of free reported speech reinforces this simplistic approach to the war.

6) a) tired, safe, frightened.
b) The two sirens are described as if they were human beings. There is in fact a confusion between the adjectives
attached to each one and the feelings they provoke among the population.

7) a) The use of would in this sentence corresponds to the conditional.
b) Here would conveys a habit, something that happened on a regular basis.



COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE CORRIGE

II) VERSION

Un masque à gaz en forme de Mickey qui produisait de la vapeur quand on respirait, son père qui se munissait d'un
casque et d'un sifflet, Jill qui pleurait parce que son papa s'en allait rejoindre l'armée de l'air, la T.S.F. qui marchait
tout le temps, du papier noir collé sur les fenêtres du devant, le déclenchement des sirènes, le fait de se lever au
beau milieu de la nuit à cause des raids aériens, voilà ce que voulait dire la guerre ; il ne mit pas longtemps à le
comprendre. C'était marrant de se lever en pleine nuit. GRP 2 L


And a marvellous teacher she was. She had the gift of exciting us to desire knowledge for its own sake, quite
apart from that needed for examinations, and our reading went far beyond the humdrum authors we'd have found
for ourselves, if left to our own devices.
I, a natural born swot, was a great favourite of hers. This was a mixed blessing, which rather embarrassed me,
for 'teacher's pet' was an insult in the tenements.
Miss McKenzie refused to be kept at arm's length though, for she seemed to sense something in me which
needed encouragement. She was greatly surprised to discover, when we acted out our little bits of Shakespeare
that I had a passionate interest in the theatre. She knew, of course, that my mother was a widow with few
pennies to spare for theatres, so she it was who took me to a matinée one marvellous Saturday, to see Shakespeare
performed as it ought to be, in a real theatre in the town.
It felt very strange to be meeting Miss McKenzie at the tram-stop, dressed in my best coat, and the tammy
Grannie had knitted. I was terrified any of my school-friends would see us and jeer 'teacher's pet'", which might put
my teacher off the whole idea of taking me to the theatre, but mercifully they were all at the penny matinée, so we
were safe. Although I felt a bit ill-at-ease sitting so close to her on the tram seat, I had to say something, so I
launched into an account of how my mother had read my teacup the night before and had predicted a
disappointment for me, and I'd prayed that the disappointment might not be that something would prevent us from
seeing Shakespeare.
Miss McKensie seemed to have trouble with a cough just then, and even had to wipe her eyes, and I wondered
if she was laughing at me. When I told Grannie about this later she was scandalized that I'd told my teacher about
us believing in teacup fortunes. 'She'll think we're a lot o' heathens', declared Grannie. 'When'll ye learn to haud yer
tongue'.
Although I basked in Miss McKenzie's approval, I never really felt very
close to her. We all held our teachers in some awe, and it never dawned on me to ask her advice as to what I
should do when I left school. Surely there was only one thing to do ? Get a job and earn money to the household
purse as quickly as possible.
What sort of job ? Oh, if only I were lucky enough, it could be the Cooperative offices, a highly prized post in
our district. I'd start as an office girl, and go to night classes to try to master the mysteries of office routine. If I
couldn't get in there it would have to be a shop.
But Miss McKenzie had other ideas. We in our house knew nothing of scholarships for fatherless children.
The idea of a child from a working-class household going to college was the very stuff of story-books, and had
nothing to do with business of living as we knew it.
Unknown to us, she bullied the headmaster into putting my name forward for a special scholarship open to
children who showed some promise, and who would benefit from further education.
Molly WEIR
Trilogy of Scottish childhood
shoes were for Sunday, 1970
Notes lexicales :
line 3 - humdrum : boring, dull line 5 - swot : hard-working student
line 7 - tenements : flats rented cheaply line 16- tammy : béret écossais.
line 27 - heathens : people without any religion., here savages, barbarians.

I COMPREHENSION – COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE – EXPRESSION
1. What kind of text is it? Justify by quoting from the text.
......

2. What tense is mostly used by narrator throughout the text ? Why ?
.....

3. a) Is the narrator a boy or a girl? Justify from the text.
...
b) Using your own words, describe the narrator's family and social background (about 40 words)
...

4. Who is the main character ?
... 5. a)"And a marvellous teacher she was"(1.1)
What is the effect produced by the word order in the above sentence?
...
b) What feeling is expressed through it ?
...
c) Rewrite the following sentence (1.1) using two different structures ; make sure you keep the same idea.
"And a marvellous teacher she was".
a...
b...

6. Why was the narrator 'a great favourite of 'the teacher's'? (justify with two quotations in your answer.
...

7. THIS was a mixed blessing (1.5-6)
a) what does 'THIS' refer to ?
...
b) Why was 'this' a MIXED blessing'?
...

8. Explain the connotation of the expression 'teacher's pet'? Justify with two quotations from the text.
...

9. In your own words, say what the theatre outing represented for the narrator.
...

10. Comment on Miss Mckenzie's reaction on hearing about the teacup prediction. What did she realize then?
(about 50 words).
...

11. "When'll ye learn to haud yer tongue' (1.27-28)
a)Rewrite the sentence in standard English.
...
b)What does this type of language reveal about the grandmother's education ?
...

12. a) She bullied the headmaster into putting my name forward for a special scholarship' (1.41-42) What does this
quotation reveal about Miss Mckenzie's temperament ?
...
b) Find another quotation confirming this trait of character.
...

How decisive was the teacher's influence in the narrator's life (about 40 words)
...

13. Choose ONE of the following subjects :

a) How do you choose what your read? (about 200 words)


or

b) Can school arouse in pupils some particular interest which may later become a passion ? (about 200 words).
...

COMPETENCE LINGUISTIQUE

2) VERSION (6 points)

Translate into French from 1.33 "Oh, if only..."... to 1.40 "we knew it". CORRIGE COMPREHENSION

1. It's an extract from a novel which must be an autobiography ("I"+Molly WEIR, Trilogy of Scottish Childhood).

2. The simple past is mostly used. It is the tense used for a narration.

3.a. She is a girl(l.34-35)."I'd start as an office girl..."
3.b. The narrator comes from a working-class family. Her father is dead since her mother is a widow. They are
poor(few pennies to spare for theatres).The way the grandmother speaks shows. They live in a tenement. She is not
educated. Moreover they read the future in teacups.

4. It is Miss Mac Kenzie, the teacher.

5.a. The word "marvellous" is put forward. It emphasizes the value of the teacher, the opinion the narrator has of
her.
5.b. It reveals the admiration and reverence, the consideration the narrator has for Miss Mac Kenzie.
5.c. What a marvellous teacher she was!
How marvellous a teacher she was!

6. Because she was hard-working and promising.
l.5"a natural born swot
l.8-9"she seemed to sense something in me which needed encouragement".

7.a. The fact to be a favourite of the teacher.
7.b. On the one hand, it was a source of pride, but on the other hand, it was embarrassing towards the other pupils.

8.It implies one is submissive, one is at the teacher's beck and call.
l.6" teacher's pet was an insult..."
l.16-17" I was terrified any of my school-friends would see us and jeer "teacher's pet...".

9. It was something she would never have dared to dream of since she knew her family couldn't afford it.

10. She had a fit of laughter which she tried to conceal by making as if she was coughing. At that moment, she may
have become aware of the narrator's family background.

She became conscious that they were not educated, were somewhat superstitious and realized how deserving the
girl was.

11.a. When will you learn to hold your tongue ?
b. She is not educated and speaks colloquial English.

12.a. She was determined to help the narrator and she dared challenge the headmaster's authority who must have
been reluctant at first.
b. l.37 "But Miss Mac Kenzie had other ideas".

Without her, she would never have been granted a schoolarship.
She would never have been able to make studies and climb up the social ladder.
Without her teacher, the best position she could have had was a job in an office.

CORRIGE VERSION (6 points) Translate into French from 1.33 "Oh, if only..."...to 1.40 "we knew it".

Oh, si seulement j'avais assez de chance, cela pourrait être un emploi dans les bureaux de la coopérative, une
situation hautement considérée dans notre région. Je commencerais comme simple employée et je suivrais les cours
du soir afin d'essayer de maîtriser les mystères de la routine du travail de bureau. Si je ne pouvais y entrer, alors ce
serait donc un emploi dans un magasin. Mais Mademoiselle Mc Kenzie avait d'autres projets.
.../...
A la maison, nous n'étions pas au courant des bourses d'études accordées aux orphelins de père. L'idée qu'un enfant
issu d'une famille modeste puisse aller à l'université relevait uniquement du roman et n'avait rien à voir avec la
vraie vie telle que nous la connaissions.