BLACKWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

BLACKWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

-

English
10 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

  • cours - matière potentielle : resource
  • cours - matière potentielle : students
  • cours - matière potentielle : program
  • cours - matière potentielle : program coles
  • exposé
  • expression écrite
  • cours - matière potentielle : netball championship
  • cours - matière potentielle : with equipment that students
  • cours - matière potentielle : issues
  • revision
  • cours - matière potentielle : competitions
  • cours - matière potentielle : students study
  • cours - matière potentielle : for the remainder of the year
  • cours - matière potentielle : uniform
  • cours - matière potentielle : laboratories
  • cours - matière potentielle : netball championships
  • cours - matière potentielle : from the district
  • cours - matière potentielle : assembly
Welcome to Term 3 – We would like to welcome Ms Amelia Pickard to the school for the remainder of the year. Amelia will be teaching Home Economics and Child Studies. Also, we welcome back Mr James Connell and Ms Karyn Jones who were on leave in Term 2. This term we welcome a group of ten student teachers from Flinders University who will be undertaking their teacher practicum with us. We also welcome twelve International students from Japan and China who will be with us for either a term or to finish their secondary education.
  • sausage sizzle by the src
  • many vouchers
  • vegetable garden
  • dog training
  • world vision
  • point to the point
  • point for point
  • point by point
  • exhibition
  • school
  • program
  • students

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Reads 21
Language English
Report a problem
Lesson Plan 13 Food, Exercise & Energy Brief description Students use nutrition information to calculate the number of teaspoons of fat and sugar in their favourite food and drinks. Using tables provided, they convert the energy content into an equivalent amount of exercise. For example, 600ml lemonade = 18 tsps sugar, 1220 kilojoules, approx. 45 min running! They compare these results to their daily energy requirements. Duration: 40 – 90 minutes total (two sessions) Year level: Middle to upper primary SourceiStoc Topics: Nutrition, energy, researching and communicating Preparation: 5 to 10 minutes Extensions: ART: Use the results to design an educational poster about food energy and exercise Overview This activity can be conducted in numerous ways depending on age and ability – please consider the individual needs of your class when planning and allocating times. Session 1: Introduce lesson (20 – 30 min) Whole class PerformTeacher Demonstration 13* (10 – 15 min) ‘Sugar Shocker’  *download fromabc.net.au/science/surfingscientist  Discussion Whole Class Research Nutrition Information (10 – 15 min)  Select a range of foods Session 2 : Calculate sugar, fat and energy content (20 – 30 min) Individual Calculate sugar, fat and energy content and (30 – 60 min)  equivalents  Investigate and discuss possible ways to represent  results graphically and design posters Whole Class Discussion (10 – 15 min)
Lesson 13 – Food, Exercise & Energy Page 1 ©2006 | ABC Science Online
Materials and equipment Teacher Demonstration y Copy of “Sugar Shocker” available at: abc.net.au/science/surfingscientist/teachstuff yteaspoon(s) Metric y Drinking glass y Sugar y(cheap vegetable is fine) Oil y(two varieties if possible) Softdrink y Chips (two varieties if possible) ySoftdrink (two varieties if possible) yChocolate bar (two varieties if possible) Poster Design The following are suggestions are all optional – students may be able to bring some
of these items from home: y Magazines / newspapers (for clippings) y Digital camera (to photograph foods, sugar, fat content) ysized paper / cardboard Poster y Printer y Pens, pencils, paints, coloured paper
Chips and a drink
There are 18 teaspoons of sugar in one 600 ml bottle of softdrink and 18 ml of fat in one 50 packet of chips and a total of 2270 kilojoules
Lesson 13 – Food, Exercise & Energy Page 2 ©2006 | ABC Science Online
Objectives Students’ prior knowledge No prior knowledge is required or assumed for this lesson plan.Science / mathematics skills Students will: Use theTable 1: Estimated Energy Requirementsto determine the amount boy or girl of average weight and height for a particular age and gender requires every day  Use nutrition labels or other sources of information to determine the fat, sugar and energy content per serving of various food and drinks(eg internet resource such Calorie King)  Convert sugar and fat content into number of teaspoons using the following conversion factors:  1 tspn of white sugar weighs 4 grams  1 tspn of fat (oil) weighs 4.2 grams  UseTable 2: Energy used in various activities orTable 2a: Energy Ratesto convert energy content into minutes of various types of exercise for a particular weight Science / nutrition concepts  Humans need to eat food for energy and essential nutrients  The amount of energy in foods varies greatly amount of other nutrients in food varies greatly The amount of energy different people need to consume per The day varies greatly between individuals  Exercise consumes large amounts of energy  Every person should get plenty of exercise everyday Positive attitudes Students will Appreciate the value of research skills for making informed choices an appreciation for the complexity of human nutrition Develop and appreciation for the relationship between food Develop energy (energy in) and exercise energy (energy out)
Lesson 13 – Food, Exercise & Energy Page 3 ©2006 | ABC Science Online
Procedure Session1: Teacher Demonstration and discussion (20 – 30 min) and discuss the “Sugar Shocker” teacher demonstration Perform  Convert the energy content into an exercise equivalent using either the formula or table provided (see Teacher Notes or Energy Fact Sheet) the demonstration to determine the sugar and/or fat (oil) content for a Repeat packet of crisps and/or a chocolate bar (use a medicine cup to show students the amount of fat/oil) the variety of nutrients we need in our diet – the National Health and Discuss Medical Research Council of Australia lists 28 essential vitamins and minerals  Compare the energy content and nutritional value of snack foods and softdrinks to estimated daily energy requirements  Example: Chips and a Drink  The combined energy in one 600ml bottle of softdrink (~1200 kJ) and one 50g packet of potato chips (~1050kJ) is approximately 2250 kJ – this represents almost one third (27%) of a moderately active 8 year old boy’s total daily energy requirements but without providing any other essential vitamins or minerals  Discuss the student task eg:  research the nutrition information (by bringing in packets or labels, or by other means) of some food and drink products and bring them to class Session 2: Convert sugar, fat and energy values (20 – 30 min) Individual/Groups (15 – 20 min)  Students use the nutrition information they have collected to convert sugar and fat content into number of teaspoons they convert the energy content into an equivalent amount of energy Next using the tables provided or using the formula Discuss possible ways to represent values – Whole Class (10 – 15 min) might include Examples  sugar cubes to represent teaspoons sugar content  blocks of butter to represent fat content Design Energy Posters – Group or individual (30 – 45 min)  Finish as homework or as an art exercise Discuss the lesson – Whole Class (5 – 10 min)  Discuss the class findings and any changes to attitudes to food and eating behaviour
Lesson 13 – Food, Exercise & Energy Page 4 ©2006 | ABC Science Online
8200
8400
8100
7800
6700
6400
7000
5700
7400
Teacher’s notes Table 1: Estimated Daily Energy Requirements The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia provides Estimated Daily Energy Requirements for use in Australia and New Zealand. They should be used cautiously and as a guide only. Individual differences and variations in levels of physical activity make predicting an individual’s daily energy requirements extremely difficult. The estimates provided are for individuals of average height and healthy weight. Girls AgeWeightHeightBMRLittle Light Moderate Heavy Vigorous ty Activity Activity Activity Ac  ( kg)(cm) Activi tivity
6900
7600
7300
8000
9000
7700
8200
8500
6500
7300
6000
10700
9900
6100
Little Activity
Lesson 13 – Food, Exercise & Energy Page 5 ©2006 | ABC Science Online
8800
Moderate Activity
7800
10500
9900
9300
7800
11800
10300
7000
7300
7700
8700
8300
8800
9300
11200
10000
4800
6800
8200
Light Activity
7300
6400
4500
14700
16200
9300
8200
Age
Weight(kg)
23.1
14000
15400
8400
5900
9600
16700
10
29.0
7
9
8
25.6
22.8
32.9
41.6
14
49.4
15
52.0
13
53.9
45.8
16
9500
17
37.2
55.1
12
11
13
25.6
45.6
10800
8500
9200
8900
10600
11900
9700
9200
15200
12200
11200
13200
11000
11600
14600
11400
10700
10600
12000
13200
12900
12600
12200
11600
10400
5700
6600
4900
5200
5500
4000
128
162
133
144
163
122
Height(cm)
128
139
6200
5400
8
7
156
9
Source:
Boys
151
121
138
4700
4200
4500
4300
5800
160
163
5900
157
5100
149
144
5800
134
BMR
10400
13600
12000
12400
12800
9500
8700
Heavy Activity
Vigorous Activity
13700
Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand, 2006National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia
12600
10100
175
7600
164
174
170
7000
11700
13100
11900
11100
7300
11500
16
60.9
51.0
17
64.6
56.3
15
14
8900
9500
13200
10000
9100
8100
9400
8600
11000
10000
10
28.6
11
31.9
35.9
40.5
12
10300
9400
10000
10600
10700
9500
Energy expenditure for various activities (approx.)  Activity Energy (kJ/kg/h)  Sitting quietly 1.7  Writing 1.7  Standing relaxed 2.1  Driving a car 3.8  Vacuuming 11.3  Walking rapidly 14.2  Running 29.3  Swimming (4km/hour) 33  Rowing in a race 67 Source: Better Health Channel www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au Researching sugar, fat and energy content  Nutrition labels  Food manufacturer’s websites  Calorie King Australia food database: www.calorieking.com.au/foods/
SourceiStoc
Lesson 13 – Food, Exercise & Energy Page 6 ©2006 | ABC Science Online
ENERGY: how much do you need?
Why you need energy All your energy comes from the food and drinks you consume. Most of this energy (45 - 70%) is used for important functions like growing, maintaining
body temperature and healing wounds. The total
energy required for all these functions is called yourBasal Metabolic Rate(BMR). The basal metabolic rate varies between individuals. Most of the remaining energy from all the food you’ve eaten gets used for physical activity.
TABLE 1: Estimated EnergyRequirements (Kilojoules per day)
Running, riding, swimming and even just putting the
dishes away all consume energy. It is very difficult to calculate exactly how much energy you need. Luckily, you don’t need to as long as you exercise every day and eat healthy foods.Energy and health How much energy you need depends on many variables but the biggest is exercise. The more you exercise, the more energy you burn and the more
food you need to eat. If you eat more than you
need, your body may try store this excess energy
as body fat.
Girls Light Moderate Age BMR Activity Activity 74000 6500 7300 84200 6900 7700 982004500 7300 1085004700 7600 11 4900 8000 9000 125200 8500 9500 13100005500 8900 14103005700 9200 155800 9400 10600 16107005900 9500 17108005900 9600 Source: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia
Heavy Activity
8100 8600 9100 9500 10000 10600 11100 11500 11700
11900 12000
Student Fact Sheet
Eating well is only half of what is necessary to be
healthy. The other half is plenty of exercise every day. Nothing can replace exercise. Eating well without exercising is not healthy by itself. Fortunately, exercising is lots of fun and makes you feel great, sleep well and be happy! Using this table wisely This table is a guide only! It is based on girls and boys of average height and healthy weight for each age. Even so, the energy required per day can be
very different for two very similar people!
Boys BMR
4300 4500 4800 5100 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7300 7600
Light Activity
7000 7300 7800 8300 8800 9300 10000 10600 11200 11800 12200
Moderate Activity
7800 8200 8800 9300 9900 10500
11200 11900 12600 13200 13700
Heavy Activity
8700 9200 9700 10400 11000 11600
12400 13200 14000
14700 15200
660
 Based on Energy Expenditure Rates(Better Health Channel www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au)
150
990
990
1320
80
50
ENERGY: how much do use?
75
40
All your energy comes from the food and drinks you consume. Doing any physical activity consumes energy. Some types of activity burn more energy than others. Two people doing the same activity may burn different amounts of energy. This depends on many factors including each person’s weight. A heavier person will burn more energy than a lighter person doing the same activity. The table below lists the energy used during various activities for people who weigh 40, 50 or 60 kilograms. They are only a guide to give an estimate of the energy consumed during exercise. TABLE 2: Energy used in various activities (kilojoules)
145
50
95
190
Writing
Swimming (4km/hour)
215
425
115
60
330
140
1650
1240
495
355
535
180
825
415
710
285
570
425
115
50
20
45
85
25
70
15
35
65
Table 2a: Energy rates ctivity Energy rate (kJ/kg/h) Sitting quietly 1.7 Writing 1.7 Standing relaxed 2.1 Driving a car 3.8 Vacuuming 11.3 Walking rapidly 14.2 Running 29.3 Swimming (4km/hour) 33 Rowing in a race 67 Source: Better Health Channel www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au
Driving a car
100
Student Fact Sheet
Walkingrapidly
230
170
850
640
1485
1980
ENERGY IN / ENERGY OUT Select three or four types of food and do the following: 1. Write the name of the food or drink and draw the food item (or find a picture/photograph) 2. Check the nutrition label and write down the sugar, fat and energy content. 3. Convert sugar and fat content into teaspoons or millilitres. 4. Select a type of exercise from Table 2 and convert the energy content of per serving of each food (select your nearest weight and find the nearest energy) 1. ____________________________ Serving Size: ______________grams / ml Sugar: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns  Fat: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns / ml  Energy: _________________ kilojoules picture or drawing  One serving is equivalent to _________________minutes of ____________________________ 2. ____________________________ Serving Size: ______________grams / ml  Sugar: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns  Fat: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns / ml  Energy: _________________ kilojoules picture or drawing  One serving is equivalent to _________________minutes of ____________________________ 3. ____________________________ Serving Size: ______________grams / ml  Sugar: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns  Fat: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns / ml  Energy: _________________ kilojoules picture or drawing  One serving is equivalent to _________________minutes of ____________________________
4. ____________________________ Serving Size: ______________mlgrams /  Sugar: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns  Fat: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns / ml  Energy: _________________ kilojoules picture or drawing  One serving is equivalent to _________________minutes of ____________________________ 5. ____________________________ Serving Size: ______________grams / ml  Sugar: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns  Fat: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns / ml  Energy: _________________ kilojoules picture or drawing  One serving is equivalent to _________________minutes of ____________________________ 6. ____________________________ Serving Size: ______________mlgrams /  Sugar: _________________ grams  _________________ tspns  Fat: _________________ grams tspns / ml _________________  Energy: _________________ kilojoules picture or drawing  One serving is equivalent to _________________minutes of ____________________________