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The University of Edinburgh
School of Divinity
2011 – 2012















First Year
Course Compendium
School of Divinity

First Year Courses Compendium


Essay Deadlines .............................................................................................................1
Timetable 2011 – 2012 ..................................................................................................2
Assessment Criteria: Level 8 Courses ...........................................................................3
Academic Skills for Divinity Students – DIVI07003....................................................4
Biblical Studies: An Introduction 1 (20) BIST080085
Biblical Texts in Translation 1 (20) BIST08009 .........................................................12
Christian Ethics: Sources (20) THET08011 ................................................................18
Christian Theology 1 (20) THET08006.......................................................................23
Hebrew 1 (20) BIST08002...........................................................................................28
History of Christianity as a World Religion 1A (20) ECHS08005 .............................30 orld Religion 1B (20) ECHS08004..............................34
New Testament Greek 1 (20) BIST08004 ...................................................................38
Religion 1A: Religion in the Contemporary World: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
(20) REST08006 ..........................................................................................................40
Religion 1B: Religion in the Contemporary World: Indigenous religions and the
religions of Asia (20) REST08005 ..............................................................................46
First Year Course Management Team .........................................................................52

Essay Deadlines

All essays should be submitted via Web-CT before 2 p.m. on the designated day below.

Semester 1
Course name Due date
Biblical Studies: An Introduction 1 First essay Monday, 17 October 2011
Second essay Monday, 14 November
2011

Christian Theology 1 Monday, 31 October 2011

History of Christianity as a World Religion 1A Monday, 7 November 2011

Religion 1A Monday, 14 November 2011

Semester 2
Course name Due date
Biblical Texts in Translation First essay Friday, 17 February 2012
Second essay Wednesday, 28 March
2012

Christian Ethics: Sources Monday, 12 March 2012

Hebrew 1 No essay
Weekly class assessments
Class test on Monday, 20 February
2012

History of Christianity as a World Religion 1B Monday, 12 March 2012

New Testament Greek 1 No essay
Class test mid-term

Religion 1B Monday, 5 March 2012
Timetable 2011 – 2012
1st Semester
Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri
09:00-
09:50
10:00- BS1 BS1 BS1 BS1 BS1
10:50 Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction
Break
11:10- Religion 1A Religion 1A Religion 1A Religion 1A
12:00
1210-1300 HCWR 1A HCWR 1A HCWR 1A HCWR 1A
Lunch
14:00- Christian Christian Christian Christian
14:50 Theology 1 Theology 1Theology 1 Theology 1
15:00-
15:50
Break
16:00-
16:50

2nd Semester
Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri
09:00- Hebrew 1 Hebrew 1 Hebrew 1 Hebrew 1
09:50
10:00- Biblical Texts 1 Biblical Texts Biblical Biblical Texts Biblical Texts 1
10:50 1 Texts 1 1
NT Greek 1 NT Greek 1
NT Greek 1 NT Greek 1
Break
11:10- Religion 1B Religion 1B Religion 1B Religion 1B
12:00
12:10- HCWR 1B HCWR 1B HCWR 1B HCWR 1B
13:00
Lunch
14:00- CE: Sources CE: Sources CE: Sources CE: Sources
14:50
15:00-
15:50
Break
16:10-
17:00
Italics = Tutorials/Seminars
2Assessment Criteria: Level 8 Courses
(also reproduced in the School of Divinity Undergraduate Handbook)

To pass a pre-Honours course you must obtain an overall course mark of 40%. Additionally,
you must obtain 40% in each assessment component: that is, 40% in the examination, and
40% in both the written assignment (normally an essay) and in the class component (where
this is assessed), which together make up the in-course assessment. The class component may
consist of one or more units of assessment, such as tutorial participation and presentation,
blogging, etc, which generate a single aggregate mark.
In pre-honours courses, students who fail to obtain 40% in either or both the essay and any
assessed class component, and/or who fail to obtain 40% in the examination, must re-sit each
failed assessment component in order to pass the course.
 If you fail the class component (if applicable for your course): A failed class
component must be re-taken as a self-contained assessment unit over the summer re-sit
thperiod – submission deadline 10 August and will be considered at the August re-sit
Board of Examiners (exceptionally, an equivalent assessment unit may be substituted:
see below).
 If you fail the essay: The Course Manager will assign a relevant topic. Your essay must
be at the original word length. This must be submitted on Web-CT by the deadline of
th2 pm on 10 August. Re-sit essays from both semesters will be considered at the August
re-sit Board of Examiners. A failed re-sit essay will require re-sitting the essay again in
the next presentation of the course (exceptionally, an equivalent assessment unit may be
substituted: see below).
 If you fail the exam in the December/May diet: The re-sit examination must be taken
in the August re-sit diet. A failed re-sit exam must be re-taken in the following session’s
examination diet (exceptionally, an equivalent assessment unit may be substituted: see
below).
 Components which have been passed, ie a mark of 40% or above is attained, will be
carried over to the next sitting.

Where, exceptionally, the course will not be presented in the following session, the Course
Manager (with CHSS approval) may substitute an equivalent re-sit assessment task for any or
all of the assessed components of a course, to cover up to 100% of the course learning
outcomes.

3Academic Skills for Divinity Students – DIVI07003

Course Manager: Dr Jessie Paterson
Jessie.Paterson@ed.ac.uk; 0131 650 7953
Class Venue: Online (WebCT) and one lecture Tuesday 20th September 13:10-
13:50 in Lecture Room 1
Semester: 1 and 2
Description of Course
The primary aim of the course is to provide students with the basic academic skills that are
required for studying at the School of Divinity. At the same time the course introduces the
wider skills and abilities that being at university allows students to develop - these at
Edinburgh are contained within the graduate attribute framework.
The course materials are provided on-line through WebCT with links to the e-portfolio tool
PebblePad. The basic academic skills are provided as a series of modules within the
appropriate graduate attribute (these being: Research and enquiry, Personal and intellectual
autonomy, Communication and Personal Effectiveness).
The core modules are released throughout the academic year according to the timetable
provided in WebCT. The core modules include:-
 Library Resources 1 and 2 – use of the online and physical Library, etc
 Essay writing – including correct use of footnotes, issues of plagiarism
 IT – including basic IT, communication, IT at Edinburgh
 Seminar preparation – including use of presentation tools (like powerpoint)
 Getting most out of your time at University
Prerequisites for Course
No formal prerequisites.
Learning Outcomes
After successful completion of this course, students will have the essential skills required for
their studies at the School and have started the process of engaging with the University’s
graduate attributes. Examples of the skills they will acquire include:-
 Produce an essay using a word processor in the format required by the School.
Understand what plagiarism means, and avoid committing it
 Communicate by email with peers and academic staff
 Have basic knowledge of internet research skills
 Use IT software to prepare a slide show for use in seminars.
Requirements and Assessment
Please note that, although this is a non-credit course, a pass is required in order to
progress to Honours. Assessment consists of small multi-choice assessments at the end of
each of the core modules listed above. Completion dates for these assessments will be at the
student's own pace but all assessments must be completed by the Friday prior to the start of
the exam diet in the second semester, with the final results (pass/fail) being presented at the
June Board of Examiners.
Failure to do the assessments or unsuccessful completion in year 1 will require a re-sit over
the summer. If still failed, a further two re-sit attempts are permitted in year 2. Continued
failure will prevent entry into Honours.
Course Outline – All material will be provided online as series of modules; students will
work through each module in the order provided. Detailed instructions are provided in the
WebCT course and at the lecture.
4Biblical Studies: An Introduction 1 (20) BIST08008


Course Manager: Professor Hans Barstad 0131 650 8916
h.barstad@ed.ac.uk
Student consultation times: by appointment.
Teaching Staff: Professor Hans Barstad (above)
Dr Helen Bond
h.bond@ed.ac.uk
Class Contact Hours: Semester 1
Lectures: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays 10-10:50 am (plus the
Fridays of weeks 1 & 6).
Seminars: Wednesdays OR Fridays 10-10:50 am
Class Venue: Lectures: Lecture Room 1, New College
Seminars: See Biblical Studies notice board in foyer.
Initial Class Meeting: Monday, 19 September 2011, 10 am, Lecture Room 1, New College
Description of Course
This course is intended as an introduction to the Scriptures of the Jewish and Christian
traditions and to the modern scholarly study of these Scriptures. No prior knowledge of the
Bible is presumed, nor is any particular religious affiliation. Textbooks: 1. Stephen Harris,
Understanding the Bible. 2. An English Bible (BYOB). The required readings accompanying
lectures include selected biblical writings and large amounts of the textbook. The limited
course time requires focus on selected biblical texts/writings that have had comparatively
greater influence on faith communities, have drawn much scholarly attention, and/or are
particularly illustrative of major foci in the course. The lecture-sessions (Mondays, Tuesdays
& Thursdays) provide orientation, underscore matters particularly important at an
introductory level, and demonstrate scholarly approaches to the Bible. The course seminars
(Wednesdays/Fridays) are intended to give you some experience in first-hand and focused
exploration of selected texts and discussion of them in small seminar groups. The course
essays give you opportunities to apply particular scholarly approaches to biblical texts,
interact with relevant scholarly publications, and develop skill in presenting your ideas in
written form.
Prerequisites for Course
No formal prerequisites.
Learning Outcomes
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate the
following:
 an understanding of the social and historical context of the collection of texts known
as “the Bible”;
 an understanding of main literary conventions found in those texts; and
 a familiarity with some of the interests and concerns of modern biblical scholarship;
and will be able to:
 identify different key literary genres found in the Bible;
 apply a variety of interpretative methods to biblical texts; and
5 assess different theories and approaches on the origins and interpretation of the
Bible.
Requirements and Assessment
 Two 1500-word essays (15% of course mark for each), the first due Monday, 17
October by 2pm (beginning of week 5), the second due Monday, 14 November by
2pm (beginning of week 9). Note carefully the further details on essays later in this
course entry.
 Regular attendance and prepared participation in the weekly course seminars (10% of
course mark). See below for further information.
 A degree exam (60%) in the December examinations diet, which will be based on
lectures, required readings, and weekly seminar topics.
In order to pass this course, you must obtain a minimum of 40% in each of the above
assessed components.
Students have the choice of whether the final exam script is hand-written or typed on a laptop.
A training/familiarisation session will be available between 1-2 pm on Tues 11 October 2011
in Lecture Room 1 and further details will be given in WebCT and in the Undergraduate
(Red) Handbook. Students will be asked to confirm if they are considering the typed option
by 2 December (students who have indicated the typed option can elect on the day to
handwrite). Any queries should be sent to Dr Jessie Paterson (Jessie.Paterson@ed.ac.uk).
Assessment Criteria
Your final course mark will be determined on your ability to demonstrate the following:
 an understanding of the contents, religious ideas, and key issues associated with the
collection of texts known as “the Bible”;
 familiarity with some of the interests/concerns of modern biblical scholarship;
 regular preparation for, and informed verbal participation in, weekly course seminars;
 an ability to write good essays with proper footnotes and references;
 a critical engagement with the subject; and
 evidence of good use of the library and wider reading.

Course Outline
Required readings in the Bible and the textbook by Harris are indicated in brackets for each
week. “Harris” (= the textbook) is described more fully below under “Required Reading”.

I. The Old Testament

Week 1 (19-23 Sept): Overview & Orientation [Barstad] (reading: Harris, 1-85)
Monday: Course introduction
Tuesday: On Close Reading
Thursday: Ancient Near East and Ancient Palestine (reading: Harris, 37-69)
Friday: (All students meet in Martin Hall): Ancient Israel (reading: Harris, 70-85)

Week 2 (26-30 Sept): OT1: Torah [Barstad] (required readings: Genesis; Exodus 1-15; 19-
24; Leviticus 17-26; Deuteronomy 12-26; Harris, 86-145)
6Monday: Genesis
Tuesday: Exodus
Thursday: Legal Collections (Exodus-Deuteronomy)
Wed/Fri Seminar: Laws Protecting the Vulnerable (Exodus 22:21-24 // Leviticus 19:33-34 //
Deuteronomy 24:17-22). What elements are shared among these laws-lists? What are
their distinctive emphases, and how do these relate to the larger collections of
material in which they are found? In addition to consulting commentaries, see also
the articles on “widow”, “orphan”, “sojourner”, etc., in one of the standard Bible
dictionaries (e.g., Anchor Bible Dictionary, reference section of NC Library).

Week 3 (3-7 Oct): OT2: Former Prophets [Barstad] (required readings: Joshua 1; 23-24;
Judges 1-3; 1 Samuel 8-12; 1 Kings 11-12; 2 Kings 17; 22-25; Harris, 146-189)
Monday: The “Deuteronomistic History” (Joshua-Judges-Samuel-Kings)
Tuesday: Conquest (Joshua-Judges)
Thursday: King & State (Samuel-Kings)
Wednesday/Friday Seminar: Ahab and Naboth’s Vineyard (1 Kings 21). This story is of
interest on several levels, especially the literary, ethical, and political, and
theological. How do the characters interact? What does the story say about land
ownership? The rights of kingship? Does the narrator give any guidance for
interpreting the story? What various purposes might the story serve?

Week 4 (10-14 Oct): OT3: Latter Prophets [Barstad] (required readings: Amos; Isaiah 6-8;
Jeremiah 25; Ezekiel 8-10; Zechariah 7-8; Haggai; Harris, 190-231)
Monday: Prophets of the “Assyrian Period” (Amos; Hosea; Isaiah; Micah)
Tuesday: Prophets of the “Babylonian Period” (Jeremiah; Ezekiel; Second Isaiah)
Thursday: Prophets of the “Persian Period” (Third Isaiah; Haggai; Zechariah)
ORD” (Amos 5:18-27; Joel 2:1-11; Zephaniah 1:7-18; cf. Wed/Fri Seminar: “The Day of the L
Isa 13:6-9; Ezek 13:5; 30:3; Mal 4:5). The theme of the “day of the LORD” is found in
several prophetic books, though many see Amos as the source of the motif. Where
did it come from? What did it mean, and how did it develop over time? Amos
commentaries usually devote an “excursus” to the topic; see also relevant articles in
one of the standard Bible dictionaries.

NB: First essay due Monday, 17 October by 2pm.

Week 5 (17-21 Oct): OT4: Writings [Barstad] (required readings: Psalms 8, 30, 74, 95, 104,
110, 137; Proverbs 1-2, 8-9; 1 Chronicles 20-22; Harris, 232-283)
Monday: Psalms
Tuesday: Wisdom
Thursday: The “Chronicler’s History”
Weds/Friday Seminar: Proverbs 8 contains an extended speech by “Wisdom”. But who is
“Wisdom”? What does “Wisdom” claim to do, and what is the relationship between m” and the LORD? What role does this speech play in the introduction to the
book of Proverbs (Prov 1-9), and in later Jewish and Christian thinking?
7
II. The New Testament

Week 6 (24-28 Oct): The New Testament: Historical Context and Formation [Bond]
(Required reading: Mark’s Gospel; Harris, 308-42, 429-63) NB: No Wed/Fri
seminar this week. Instead there is a Friday lecture.
Monday: The Roman World of the New Testament (geography and political structures)
Tuesday: The Jewish Context
Thursday: The Formation of the New Testament
Friday: The Canonical Gospels and the Gospel of Mark (meet in Martin Hall)

Week 7 (31 Oct-4 Nov): NT2: The Gospels [Bond] (required reading: Gospel of Matthew;
Gospel of Luke; Harris, 343-91)
Monday: The “Synoptic Problem”
Tuesday: Gospel of Matthew
Thursday: Gospel of Luke
Wednesday/Friday Seminar: Study the two versions of the same stories in Mark 6:30-52 and
Matthew 14:13-33, and pay special attention to the variations in the two versions of
Jesus walking on the water. How should we account for this? Did the story suffer
like rumours do in being handed along, or did one (or both) author(s) deliberately
vary things? If the latter, why?

Week 8 (7-11 Nov): NT3: The Historical Jesus and the Apostle Paul [Bond] (required
reading: Acts of the Apostles, Philemon; Harris, 464-94)
Monday: Jesus of Nazareth and the “Historical Jesus”
Tuesday: Paul – His Mission (1)
Thursday: Paul – His Mission (2)
Friday Seminar: Philemon is the shortest Pauline epistle, but is full of fascinating detail. Do
you think that Paul was being manipulative, or mildly threatening, or was he simply
being earnest? And what did he really want from Philemon? (Read Philemon itself
carefully, and also the entry on “Philemon” in the Anchor Bible Dictionary or in the
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters.)

NB: Second essay is due Monday, 14 November by 2pm.

Week 9 (14-18 Nov): NT4: Paul’s Letters [Bond] (reading: Galatians, 1 Corinthians,
Romans; Harris, 495-504)
Monday: The Crisis in Galatia (Galatians)
Tuesday: 1 Corinthians—an early Pauline congregation & its issues
Thursday: The Epistle to the Romans (occasion and major emphases)
Wed/Fri Seminar: For Christians down the centuries, Romans 8 is one of the most fondly
read passages in the NT. Study the chapter carefully and try to identify the main
8