Persuasive Writing Unit Esperanza Rising: He Who Falls Today May ...

Persuasive Writing Unit Esperanza Rising: He Who Falls Today May ...

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  • cours - matière potentielle : plan
  • expression écrite - matière potentielle : opinion b.
  • expression écrite
Persuasive Writing Unit Esperanza Rising: He Who Falls Today May Rise Tomorrow by Pam Munoz Ryan Teacher: Emily Tipton Subject: Reading/Writing Grade Level: Fifth Duration: Four Weeks
  • appropriate forms
  • events a. anticipation guide
  • needs during the history of the u.s.
  • persuasive essays
  • passage
  • groups
  • u.s.
  • u. s.
  • 1 u.s.
  • 4 u.s.
  • guide
  • students

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The Impact of the Indian
Ocean Drive on the Shire
of Gingin












Prepared by
Audrey Hayfield 30189388
Tegan Johns 30265168
Anne Miller 30248671


TOU303 Tourism Management
Coordinator – Dr Jim Macbeth
Semester 2, 2006 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Sincere thank you to the members of the various organizations and agencies who
provided essential information and guidance for this report.


• Brooke Povah Deputy CEO, Shire of Gingin
• Lance Hardy Tourism Western Australia
• Dr Jim Macbeth Murdoch University


Special thank you to the individuals and organizations that have committed time and
research to the development of various strategic documents from which this report has
drawn information.


• Shire of Gingin Town Planning Scheme Number 8 and 9.
• Lancelin to Cervantes Coastal Road – Report and Recommendations of the
Environmental Protection Authority.
• The Indian Ocean Drive Economic and Social Impact Study.
• Gingin Coast Structure Plan.
• Turquoise Coast Island Nature Reserves Management Plan Number 50.
• Great Ocean Road Region Integrated Access Study Stage 2 Report: Strategy
Development.


Disclaimer
This strategic plan was undertaken as part of the unit of study TOU303 Tourism
Management at Murdoch University and coordinated by Dr Jim Macbeth. Whilst every
reasonable effort has been made to ensure that this document is correct at the time of
printing, Murdoch University and the students participating in this project disclaim that
there is no liability to any person in respect to anything or the consequences of anything
done or omitted to be done in reliance upon the whole or any part of this document.

For further information regarding this plan contact:
Jim Macbeth
Tourism Program
School of Social Sciences and Humanities
Murdoch University
South Street, MURDOCH, Western Australia, 6150
Tel: (08) 9360 2185
Email: j.macbeth@murdoch.edu.au
Web: www.tourism.murdoch.edu.au
1 CONTENTS

1.0 Executive Summary ………………………………………………….………….…..4
2.0 Vision …………………………………………………………………………………5
3.0 Mission ……………………………………………………………………….….…...5
4.0 Goals and Objectives ………………………………………………………….….…5
5.0 Destination Overview………………………………………….…….6
5.1 Background
5.2 Location
5.3 Local Industry
5.4 Current Land Use Zoning
5.5 Infrastructure and Services
5.5.1 Accommodation
5.5.2 Amenities and Services
5.5.3 Access
5.5.4 Attractions
5.5.5 Activities
5.6 Local Government and Strategic Partners
5.7 Visitor and Population Statistics
6.0 Current Market Analysis ………………………………………………………….19
6.1 SWOT Analysis
6.2 Target Market
6.3 Competitor Analysis
6.4 Current Destination Performance
7.0 Indian Ocean Drive Proposal ……………………………..……………………….23
7.1 The Proposal
7.2 Alternatives
7.3 Case Study Comparison
8.0 Development Considerations and Implications …………………………….……25
8.1 Proposed Land Use Zoning for Future Development
2 8.2 Infrastructure and Services
8.3 Anticipated Residential and Visitor Growth/Trends
8.4 Environmental Considerations
8.5 Social Considerations
8.6 Economic Considerations
9.0 Recommendations …………………………………….…………………………..32
9.1 Promotion of the Tourism Product
9.2 Increases in Infrastructure and Services
9.3 Stakeholder Involvement and Roles
9.4 Environmental Issues
10.0 Implementation, Monitoring and Controlling ………………………………….36
11.0 References ……………………………………….…….…………………...……..37
12.0 Appendices ………………………………………………………………………..43
3 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This destination strategic plan was undertaken as part of the unit of study TOU303
Tourism Management at Murdoch University and coordinated by Dr Jim Macbeth. This
report addresses issues relating to the Shire of Gingin that flow from the completion of
the Indian Ocean Drive and it subsequent impact on the shire. This report develops key
recommendations for the Shire of Gingin to successfully align with the surrounding
shires to strengthen brand awareness on a domestic and international level.

The town of Gingin lies approximately eighty – three kilometres north east of Perth just
off the Brand Highway. The proposed Indian Ocean Drive will link Lancelin to other
northern regions. This will not only drive the tourism market, but provide better access to
essential support services for residents living in the area. Tourism at this destination
could be increased by the development of a strong brand and image. There are primarily
traditional farms in the area; wheat, sheep and cattle. There is a strong emphasis on
natural environmental attractions, such as trail walks and recreational tourism, such as
swimming and fishing.

The proposed Lancelin to Cervantes Project involves the continued construction of the
Indian Ocean Drive. The road is expected to be a sixty – five kilometer extension of the
current Lancelin Road, joining at Pinnacles Drive. At this stage the proposed road will
cut through a small section of the Nilgen Nature Reserve but the main impact will be the
road going through the Wanagarren and Nambung Nature Reserves.

Both the Shire of Gingin and the Tourism WA representatives indicated that there is
existing friction between the coastal and inland communities. This appears to be a result
of the different interests and concerns of the residents. The perceived outcomes for inland
communities appear to be negligible; in comparison the coastal communities who had far
greater proactive approach to the potential for introduction of new industries,
employment opportunities and the development of better amenities for residents.
4 2.0 Vision Statement
To establish a sustainable development and tourism strategy that embraces the diversity
of the region. A strong local community will maximize tourism potential and increase
opportunities for local businesses and residents.


3.0 Mission
Our mission is to develop a viable strategic plan to strengthen the identity of the Shire of
Gingin, as well as increase tourism for the shire to coincide with the completion of Indian
Ocean Drive.


4.0 Goals and Objectives
This report addresses issues relating to the Shire of Gingin that flow from the completion
of the Indian Ocean Drive (IOD) and it subsequent impact on the shire. It is vital to
remember that the purpose of tourism planning is to maintain the uniqueness of a
destination while successfully improving the regional and local economy. A strong
strategic plan will outline the shire’s future direction, performance targets and strategy in
becoming a thriving tourism destination. This is an ongoing process which encompasses
the Shire of Gingin’s vision, objectives, strategy, and approach.

• Create a strategy that encompasses all aspects of the Gingin tourism product by
2008 focusing on the development of high yield and niche tourism markets, in
particular 3 – 4 star accommodation. There also needs to be further development
of events, with a focus on 4WD adventure tourism, surfing and wind surfing.
• Develop key recommendations for the Shire of Gingin to successfully align with
the surrounding shires to strengthen brand awareness on a domestic and
international level.
• Give key recommendations to the Shire of Gingin to develop accredited tourism
education, training and resources for local businesses to improve product and
service quality.
5 • Research of existing strategies and planning documents for the Shire of Gingin
will enable key considerations of triple bottom line indicators to be identified.
This will extend to include the sustainability of potable water, key infrastructure
and services, and preservation of natural assets.
• In the event of an economic downturn for small businesses inland due to the shift
in traffic flow from the introduction of the Indian Ocean Drive key issues will be
raised concerning strategic planning for small businesses and residents.





6 5.0 DESTINATION OVERVIEW

5.1 Background
The town of Gingin lies approximately eighty – three kilometres north east of Perth just
off the Brand Highway (Sydney Morning Herald, 2006). The first settlers to the area were
Robert Dale and Edward Barrett–Lennard who gained a lease from the Swan River
colony and began farming in the area in 1832 (Gingin Travel, 2006). The town was
gazetted on December 12, 1871 (Heritage Council of Western Australia, 1998).

The proposed Indian Ocean Drive will link Lancelin to other northern regions. This will
not only drive the tourism market, but provide better access to essential support services
for residents living in the area. Due to Gingin’s close proximity to Perth, the local
recreational activities and optimal weather conditions, the Shire of Gingin is currently
experiencing significant growth in the residential population. Gingin has become one of
the fastest growing rural shires in Western Australia (WA) (Gingin Shire, 2006).


5.2 Location
The Shire of Gingin covers a land area of approximately 3325 square kilometres. The
shire is bordered by Dandaragan to the north, Chittering to the east and Wanneroo to the
south. The shire encompasses the Gingin town at its centre, four coastal areas
(Guilderton, Seabird, Ledge Point and Lancelin) and six rural residential areas
(Woodridge, Sovereign Hill, Moondah Ridge, Seaview Park, Redfield Park and Ocean
Farm) (See Appendix 1 and 2) (Gingin Shire, 2006). The Shire of Gingin’s tourism is
primarily nature – based and recreational (See Appendix 3). There is a strong emphasis
on natural environmental attractions, such as trail walks and recreational tourism, such as
swimming and fishing etc. Demand for tourism at this destination could be increased by
the development of a strong brand and image (See Appendix 4).


7 5.3 Local Industry
There are primarily traditional farms in the area; wheat, sheep and cattle; however there
has been growth in the area towards goat, ostrich and marron farms, with olive groves
and vineyards becoming increasingly popular. The region is becoming well known world
wide for their unique produce (Australia Online Travel, 2006; Tannock, 2003).

Until recently towns such as Seabird were known as ‘closed towns’ with land only
available to those persons associated with the fishing industry (Gravity Discovery Centre,
2006). The fishing, agriculture and
mining industries are the major source
of employment in the region, however
strict regulations and changing weather
patterns have limited the primary
production of farming activity and the
movement of residents to coastal
communities has forced a recent trend
towards employment in the retail and service trade and white collar positions (Western
Australian Planning Commission, 2001).


5.4 Current Land Use Zoning
Due to Gingin’s proximity to Perth and the growth northwards of the metropolitan area,
the Gingin shire is experiencing overwhelming pressure to rezone rural land to
accommodate both urban and tourism development (Western Australian Planning
Commission, 2006). Limited social, commerce and physical infrastructure currently
restricts the ability to support a substantial increase in permanent residents and tourist
traffic. Table 1 illustrates the types of land use zoning currently applicable to the Gingin
shire.



8 Table 1: Existing Land Use Zoning for the Shire of Gingin
Land Use Zoning Characteristics
Residential • Marginal agricultural value.
• Primarily low density residential area.
Tourist • To contain land for tourist accommodation and associated
services.
Commercial • Major services, retail, office and entertainment.
• Focus on town sites.
Industrial • Industrial activities in town sites.
Fishing Industry • Industrial or residential use associated with fishing industry.
• Western Rock Lobster economic and social significance to
region.
Rural • Normal rural activity in shire.
Rural Industry • Industry handling, treating, processing or packing primary
products grown, reared or produced locally.
• Workshop servicing plant or equipment for rural purposes.
Rural Residential • Close proximity to metropolitan area, under pressure to
subdivide for hobby farms and further residential development.
• Provides land for range of broad based industries including
home businesses and occupations and wineries.
Rural Conservation • Land protected from rural activity.
Urban Development • Area to benefit from design and layout of works and services.
Rural Living • Land for small rural holdings not used for irrigation
horticulture.
Horticulture • Preserved land that is suitable for horticultural usage and
intensive agriculture.
• Conserve water quality and fertile soil in the shire.
Special Use • Crown Land, nature conservation, recreation, water catchment,
state forests, timber reserves & the Defence Force Australia.
Source: Western Australia. Gingin Shire. 1991. Shire of Gingin Town Planning Scheme No. 8 –Scheme Text. Perth: Gingin
Shire.

The south bank of the Moore River is currently zoned as an urban area, but the state
Government is proposing that this be re – zoned to rural (Heritage Western Australia,
2005). Residents within this area agree that it should be a rural zone to maintain the
native flora and fauna and allow public ownership of certain areas, such as national parks
(Heritage Western Australia, 2005).

The predominant developer, The Moore River Company has agreed to a compromise
with residents by suggesting that part of the land be reserved and void of development
(Tannock, 2003). The developers see the benefit of additional visitors to the region who
will be drawn to the strong identity and heritage of the region.
9