HISTORY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
16 Pages
English
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HISTORY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
16 Pages
English

Description

  • mémoire
  • dissertation
  • exposé
01-08-12 23:44 1 HISTORY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Gordana Dodig - Crnkovic, e-mail: INTRODUCTION: MILESTONES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTERS ............... 2 Before 1900: First Computing Devices.................................................................................. 2 1900 – 1939 The Rise of Mathematics................................................................................... 4 1940's: First Electronic Digital Computer.............................................................................. 4 1950's...................................................................................................................................... 5 1960's...................................................................................................................................... 5 1970's...................................................................................................................................... 6 1980's...................................................................................................................................... 6 1990's and Beyond.................................................................................................................. 7 1 LEIBNIZ: LOGICAL CALCULUS................................................................................... 8 Calculus Ratiocinator ....................................................................................................... 10 Language and Mind .......................................................................................................... 11 2 BOOLE: LOGIC AS ALGEBRA..................................................................................... 13 Bool's Algebra of Logic................................................................................................... 14 3 FREGE:
  • military code-breaking
  • theory that language
  • human knowledge
  • large numbers
  • algebra
  • machine
  • development
  • computer
  • system

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Reads 18
Language English
Document size 4 MB

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tampa bay
your way!
Multicultural Visitors Guide
Restaurants, Entertainment and Historic Places
tampa bay
your way!
Multicultural Visitors Guidecontents greetings
he Tampa Bay Your Way Multicultural Guide ofers a Dear Visitor,
handy overview of entertainment, activities, nightlife, The hospitality community extends a warm welcome to Tshopping and cultural sites in the Tampa Bay area. our visitors. We thank you for choosing Tampa Bay for your
We know your time is valuable. Many listings focus on meeting, convention or just special time with family and
downtown Tampa so that they can be reached easily on foot, or friends. You will fnd many things to do here. Or you can kick
by automobile or taxi. Additional listings in the greater Tampa back and do nothing at all. Dining and nightlife are plentiful.
Bay area are no less important nor intriguing, but a little farther Music is woven into the very essence of our present and
away. Always check www.VisitTampaBay.com for upcoming past. Our region ofers our visitors the opportunity to explore
events and specials or visit the Tampa Bay Visitor Information venues and historic districts rich in Asian, Hispanic, African-
Center and Gift Shop at 615 Channelside Drive, Suite 108A, American, and American Indian cultures.
Tampa. We hope you have a great stay in Tampa Bay! Tampa Bay & Company is proud of its role as a community
A Taste of Tampa Bay ..................................................................... 1 leader in the economic development and vitality of
Arts and Entertainment ................................................................ 3 Hillsborough County and the Tampa Bay area. As the county’s
Business, Cultural & Professional Groups ........................................ 4 ofcial tourism marketing partner, we are pleased to showcase
Cultural Stores / Museums ............................................................. 6
the positive economic benefts from our visitor industry and Places of Interest ............................................................................ 7
related local businesses which contribute signifcantly to our Tampa Bay’s Diverse Heritage ...................................................... 9
African-American ........................................................................... 9 community and region.
American Indian 10
We invite you to explore the pages of this book and discover for Asian-American 11
Hispanic ........................................................................................12 yourself the heritage and culture of our Tampa Bay.
Historic Places ...............................................................................14
Welcome,
Events Calendar .............................................................................18
Local Services .................................................................................21
African-American ..........................................................................22
Asian-American ............................................................................24
Hispanic ........................................................................................26
W. Paul Catoe
President & CEO TAMPA BAY
Tampa Bay & Company
813-223-1111
Access this publication online: www.tampaarts.com
Burgert Brothers photographs (p. 13-14) courtesy of Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Libraries.
“Tampa Bay’s Diverse Heritage,” contributed by the Tampa Bay History Center.
Anne Arthur, Researcher Jane English, DesignerA TASTE Of TAMPA BAY
Atwater’s Cafeteria La Teresita
Southern Spanish
895 22nd Ave. S., St. Petersburg 3246 W. Columbus Dr., Tampa
727-823-7018 813-879-4909a taste of
Bamboozle Café La Tropicana Café
Vietnamese Spanishtampa bay
516 N. Tampa St., Tampa 1822 E. 7th Ave., (Ybor City), Tampa
813-223-7320 813-247-4040
Byblos Café Spain Restaurant and
Middle Eastern Toma Bar
2832 S. MacDill Ave., Tampa Spanish
813-805-7977 513 N. Tampa St., Tampa
813-223-2831Carmine’s
Spanish Sumos Thai Café
1802 E. 7th Ave., (Ybor City), Tampa Asian
813-248-3834 301 E. Twiggs St., Tampa
813-849-7866Cilantro Indian Cuisine
Indian T.C. Choy’s Asian Bistro
11009 N. 56th St., Tampa Asian
813-983-8220 301 S. Howard Ave., Tampa
813-251-1191Columbia Café at the
Tampa Bay History Center Tun-Du-Ree Indian Grill
Spanish Indian
801 Old Water St., Tampa 1506 W. Kennedy Blvd.,Tampa
813-228-0097 813-251-2111
Columbia Restaurant West Tampa
Spanish Sandwich Shop
2117 E. 7th Ave., (Ybor City), Tampa Spanish
813-248-4961 3904 N. Armenia Ave., Tampa
813-873-7104The Jerk Hut
Caribbean Yoko’s Japanese
207 E. Twiggs St., Tampa Restaurant
813-223-4473 Japanese
3217 S. MacDill Ave., TampaLa Ideal
813-835-4311Spanish
2924 W. Tampa Bay Blvd., Tampa
813-870-0150
LaTam at the Centro
Spanish
1913 N. Nebraska Ave., Tampa
813-223-7338
for additional ideas on experiencing the diverse
favors of Tampa Bay, visit www.menusearch.net/tampa.
ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Hillsborough County BUSINESS, CULTURAL
Hispanic Afairs& PRofESSIo NAL
601 E. Kennedy Blvd., TampaGRo UPS
813-276-8622arts and
Asian-American Chambers morejona@hillsboroughcounty.org
of Commerce, Inc.entertainment 813-936-5100
www.aacctampabay.org
Asian Pacifc American Bar
Association of Tampa Bay
727-567-5820
chih-pin.lu@raymondjames.com
Bayanihan Arts &
Events Center
14301 Nine Eagles Dr., Tampa
813-925-1232
www.bayanihanartscenter.org Hispanic Alliance of
Tampa Bay
Chinese-American
813-417-4046
Association of Tampa Bay
www.alianzahispanatampa.org
813-974-9563
caat@yahoogroups.com Hispanic Professional
www.caatf.tripod.com Women’s Association
813-877-5880
Chinese Chamber of
Commerce of Tampa Bay India Cultural Center
727-567-5820 5511 Lynn Rd., Tampa
chih-pin.lu@raymondjames.com www.tampaicc.com
www.ccctb.com
Indo-US Chamber
Gujarati Samaj of of Commerce
Tampa Bay www.indo-us.org
www.gujaratisamaj.org
Islamic Society of
Hillsborough County Tampa Bay
African-American Afairs http://istaba.tripod.com/
601 E. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa
813-276-2637 Kuumba Dancers &
russellj@hillsboroughcounty.org Drummers
www.kuumbadancers.com
Hillsborough County
Asian-American Afairs Musikong Kawayan
601 E. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa Bamboo o rchestra
813-276-8623 14310 Nine Eagles Dr., Tampa
Springsteenk@hillsboroughcounty.org 813-925-1232
www.nhick.com/musikongkawayan
ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
NAACP The Studio @ 620 Taiwanese Chamber of
308 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 620 first Ave. S., St. Petersburg Commerce of Tampa Bay
Suite C, Tampa 727-895-6620 727-796-4489
813-234-8683 www.studio620.org/620/ president@tcctf.org
www.hillsboroughnaacp.org www.tcctf.org
Suncoast Association of
100 Black Men Chinese Americans Universal Lodge No. 178
of Tampa Bay, Inc. 941-228-2952 of free and
3837 Northdale Blvd. #165, Tampa Accepted Masons
Tampa Bay Chinese 877-636-6687 Meetings conducted in Spanish
Communitywww.100bmtb.org 1709 22nd St., Tampa
813-973-3579 813-248-6961
Philippine-American contact@tbccweb.com
Chamber of Commerce www.tbccweb.com Unlimited Gospel
25400 US Hwy. 19 N., Suite 185, Expressions
Tampa Bay Hispanic Clearwater Event Planner and Concerts
Bar Association727-797-0510 Box 11097, Tampa
o ne World Gift Shop 813-229-4137www.paccoftampabay.com 813-972-3409
first Presbyterian Church e-mail: uge_wm@yahoo.comTampa Hispanic Chamber
410 Zack St., TampaPhilippine Cultural of Commerce
813-229-0679foundation, Inc. Ybor City Chamber of 813-414-9411
14301 Nine Eagles Dr., Tampa Commerce Pinellas County African- www.tampahispanicchamber.com
813-925-1232 1800 E. 9th Ave., (Ybor City), Tampa American History Museum
www.pcftampa.org 813-248-3712Tampa Hispanic & Research Center
www.ybor.orgHeritage, Inc. 1101 Marshall St., Clearwater
Puerto Rican Chamber www.tampahispanic.com 727-532-1698
of Commerce of the Gulf CULTURAL STo RES /
Coast of florida, Inc. Tampa o rganization MUSEUMS Rainmaker
www.puertoricanchamber.net of Black Afairs at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino
Centro Ybor Museum 813-884-0267 813-874-8622 5223 Orient Rd., Tampa
and Gift Store / Ybor City www.toba-network.org 813-627-7805
Spanish Lyric Theatre Visitor Information Center Native American arts and crafts
2819 Safe Harbour Dr., Tampa Taiwanese Association of 1600 E. 8th Ave., Suite B104
813-936-0217 Tampa Bay, Inc. (Ybor City), Tampa Red Cloud fine Art
www.spanishlyrictheatre.com http://tatb.us 813-241-8838 & Jewelry
info@ybor.org 208 Beach Dr. N.E., St. Petersburg
727-821-5824
Dorothy Thompson www.redcloudindianarts.com
African-American
Museum Safety Harbor Museum of
1505 N. Madison Ave., Clearwater Regional History
Open by appt. 727-447-1037 329 Bayshore Blvd. S., Safety Harbor
727-726-1668
Dr. Carter G. Woodson www.safetyharbormuseum.org
African-American Museum
Tells the story of florida’s frst people
2240 9th Ave. S., St. Petersburg
and the arrival of Spanish explorers in
727-323-1104
the 16th century.
ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Kaleidoscope: A Heritage
of Color
Mural featuring fve infuential fgures
in Tampa’s history and located at
Macfarlane Park, 1700 N. MacDill Ave.
Robert W. Saunders, Sr.
Public Library
1505 N. Nebraska St., Tampa
813-273-3652
www.thpl.org
Sociedad La Unión The Ybor City Library was renamed in
Martí-Maceo2003 for Robert W. Saunders, former Science Center of PLACES of INTEREST
1226 7th Ave., (Ybor City), Tampafield Secretary of the NAACP. Pinellas County
Cenotaph and Ceremonial 813-223-61887701 22nd Ave. N., St. Petersburg
Rogers Park Golf CourseSpace Sculpture 727-384-0027
7911 N. Willie Black Dr., Tampaon the Riverwalk in Cotanchobee / www.sciencecenterofpinellas.com
813-356-1670fort Brooke Park, Tampafeatures a 16th-century Indian
www.rogersparkgc.com
village with recreated aboriginal Centro Asturiano
style dwellings, mounds and an 1913 N. Nebraska Ave., Tampa
archaeological excavation for use in 813-229-2214
living history demonstrations. www.centroasturianotampa.org
Tampa Bay History Center Dr. Walter Smith Library
and Museum Store 905 North Albany Ave., Tampa
801 Old Water St., Tampa 813-254-0605
813-228-0097
www.tampabayhistorycenter.org El Círculo Cubano
de TampaThe new 60,000-square-foot Center
2010 Avenida República de Cuba features the frst native inhabitants,
(Ybor City), TampaSpanish conquistadors, pioneers, Tampa Bay History Center
813-248-2954sports legends, a 1920s-era cigar
www.cubanclub.orgstore, interactive maps, and exhibits
that feature a rich ethnic heritage
El Centro Español and adventurous spirit that has
de Tampa inspired generations.
Now part of Centro Ybor
1526-36 E. 7th Ave. Ybor City State Museum
(Ybor City), Tampaand Museum Store
1818 E. 9th Ave.
Jose Martí Park(Ybor City), Tampa
1303 E. 8th Ave., (Ybor City), Tampa813-247-6323
www.ybormuseum.org
American War in the summer of 1898, with the black soldiers living in
segregated camps near Tampa Heights.Tampa Bay’ s
Tampa and St. Petersburg were fourishing at the start of the 20th Century, Diverse Heritage but Jim Crow was unyielding. In St. Petersburg, blacks were barred from sitting
on the famed green benches that lined the downtown streets where white
African-American tourists strolled. In Tampa, entertainment fgures as famed as Cab Calloway
and Ella fitzgerald stayed in downtown’s Jackson House, a home converted to a he frst black man to arrive at Tampa Bay was probably a Moorish explorer
rooming house for black travelers who had no place else to spend a night.and scout, Estevenico, or Little Steven, who arrived in 1528 with the
Despite their many obstacles, the black communities on both sides of Texpedition of Spain’s Panflo de Narvaez near what is now known as
Tampa Bay each had thriving business districts in the Jim Crow years and Madeira Beach on the Gulf of Mexico in Pinellas County. Centuries later, slaves
beyond. In Tampa, it was a stretch of Central Avenue, between Cass Street and who fed plantations in the South came to the relatively uncharted land of
7th Avenue. In St. Petersburg, it was on 22nd Street S. which locals nicknamed, florida, took up with Seminole Indians to battle white settlers and soldiers, and
simply, The Deuces. These streets bustled with activities in restaurants, night later came to be called the Black Seminoles.
clubs, movie theatres and other stores. Sadly, much of what was once there is The frst person buried in Tampa’s historic downtown cemetery, Oaklawn,
gone – the result of neglect and urban renewal. Eforts are underway to bring was a slave identifed only by the family name that owned him, the Lesley
that past back to life through reinvestment and redevelopment.family. When freedom came, blacks lived just on the edge of downtown in a
place called The Scrub. Other communities, named for founding families, such
American Indianas Dobyville and Bealsville remain and prosper today.
The cities of Tampa and St. Petersburg both were built with the help of eople began arriving in the area we now know as florida around 12,000
their African-American residents. Viable jobs provided many generations years ago. These early people were largely nomadic, and they ranged
with employment – longshoremen worked the port of Tampa, and porters Pover a land that looked quite diferent from today’s Sunshine State. The
manned the trains that passed through Union Station. Blacks were drawn florida peninsula was approximately 80 to 100 miles wider than it is today.
to St. Petersburg to build the railroad or serve as domestics at the city’s Tampa Bay did not exist – a fresh water lake sat in its place.
many resort hotels. Sea levels began to rise about 6,000 years ago. Within about 1,000 years
Afro-Cubans were among those drawn to Tampa to work in its cigar ago, the modern shape off lorida formed. Also during this time, the early Native
factories beginning in the 1880s. They worked side-by-side with the Spanish, groups began to permanently settle in what is now the Tampa Bay area. Their
Italians and white Cubans. But segregation forced them to organize their own cultures continued to develop. By the time of European contact there were
mutual aid society – like those established for the other cigar workers – called dozens of distinct groups living inf lorida, several of whom lived in the Tampa
the Sociedad La Union Martí-Maceo. Bay area.
Hundreds of Bufalo Soldiers came to Two main groups dominated pre-Columbian florida, the Timucua in
Tampa during the build-up to the Spanish- North florida and the Calusa in South florida. The Tampa Bay area was home
to smaller groups, including the Tocobaga at the northern end of Tampa Bay,
the Mocoso, who lived near present-day downtown Tampa, and the Ucita, who
lived on the southeastern shore of Tampa Bay, near present-day Ruskin.
By the time Spanish explorers arrived on florida’s shores in the early
1500s, between 100,000 and 500,000 Native people lived in florida. European
0diseases, warfare and slave raids took a grave toll onf lorida’s frst people. By in Hillsborough County. They represent 14 ethnic groups and have their roots
the early 1700s, nearly all off lorida’s indigenous population was gone. in China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar,
Spanish settlers, as well as french and English counterparts, were too few Cambodia, Philippines, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Indonesia. facilities such as the
to settle florida. At the same time, the English colonies of South Carolina and Philippine Bayanihan Arts & Events Center and the new Indian Cultural Center
Georgia were fourishing, putting pressure on the Native inhabitants of those share the traditions of these groups with the greater community.
areas. These “Creek Indians,” as called by the English, began moving south into
Spanish florida. Two main Creek migrations into florida took place in the 18th Hispanic
Century. These new floridians, along with the few remaining original tribes and
ampa’s Hispanic (Latin) heritage is as rich as the café solo – strong
former African slaves who escaped intof lorida, began to co-exist in the vast
black cofee – that you’ll fnd in the city’s Latin restaurants. The
florida wilderness. A new cultural group formed – the Seminoles. Thistory begins in 1528 with the arrival of the Spanish explorer Panflo
The Spanish, who controlled florida until 1821, did not mind this new
de Narvaez, followed 11 years later by Hernando de Soto. The Spaniards
American Indian group living in the territory, nor did the English, who took
christened Tampa Bay La Bahia del Spiritu Santo, or the Bay of the Holy
possession off lorida for 20 years (1763 - 1783). However, whenf lorida became
Spirit. When American soldiers arrived 300 years later to build the outpost
a United States Territory in 1821, attitudes towards the Seminoles changed.
eventually known as fort Brooke, they found a settlement called Spanish
The United States government fought three wars with the Seminoles. The
Town Creek in what is now one of the city’s most historic and upscale
frst war (1817 - 1819) took place even beforef lorida was a U.S. Territory. The
neighborhoods, Hyde Park.
Second Seminole War (1835 - 1842) was one of the longest and most costly
But the heart and soul of Tampa’s Hispanic story began in 1885,
Indian wars fought by the U.S. f ort Brooke, located in what is now downtown
when cigar maker Vicente Martinez Ybor decided to move his cigar making
Tampa, was the headquarters for the Army during the second war. Egmont Key,
operations from Key West to Tampa. Cuban and Spanish, as well as Italian,
at the mouth of Tampa Bay, served as one of the main points of embarkation
cigar workers quickly followed. By 1900, the cigar workers of Ybor City had
for the Seminoles awaiting deportation to the Indian Territory in Arkansas and
rolled millions of cigars, and a vibrant community came alive along Seventh
Oklahoma.
Avenue or La Setima.
fewer than 400 Seminoles lived in florida at the end of the Third Seminole
The cigar business was so good that it spread to West Tampa. At its
War (1855 - 1858). It is from this small population that today’sf lorida
height, Tampa had hundreds of factories. The cigar industry was the city’s
Seminoles and Miccosukees trace their lineage.
economic engine that turned an outpost in the florida swamp into a real city.
The cigar workers opened their own mutual aid societies to maintain Asian-American
their ethnic identity and care for each other. These clubs even ofered their
ensus records show that very few Asian-Americans (mostly Chinese) members medical services. The clubs included El Centro Español, Centro
lived in Tampa during the 1890s, only one was registered to vote. Asturiano, El Círculo Cubano, L’Unione Italiana, and for Afro-Cubans who CA small Chinese Baptist Mission operated on Seventh Avenue in were marginalized by segregation, Sociedad La Union Martí-Maceo. The
Ybor City during this year. Asians did not come to Tampa in large numbers cigar workers brought with them passionate political views. Strikes were
until the 1970s. Some were drawn by the chance to study and work at our not uncommon in the factories. The city came to be known as “the cradle
universities. Many Vietnamese came feeing war and political upheaval. of Cuban liberty” because so many cigar workers contributed to the cause
American servicemen returned with Asian wives, and others came to stay of Cuban independence from Spain. Cuba’s foremost revolutionary of the
with family who already had migrated here. But most Asians came to time, Jose Martí, frequently visited Ybor City to speak on behalf of the cause
Tampa from other states for the same reason so many other people do: for freedom, and his orders to start the uprising in 1895 were rolled up in
for a better life in the sunshine. Today, an estimated 55,000 Asians live a Tampa cigar and smuggled to Cuba. In 1898, when the United States
went to war against Spain, ultimately leading to Cuban independence that
Martí fought so hard for, the fght was launched from Tampa’s shores. Teddy Historic Places
Roosevelt stayed in what was then the fabulous Tampa Bay Hotel, which is
now the main building of the University of Tampa on the Hillsborough River. Tampa-Hillsborough County
His Rough Riders stayed near what would become fort Homer Hesterly.
Belmont Heights Little League The cigar industry, which earned
2101 E. Martin Luther King Blvd., Tampa
Tampa the moniker “Cigar City,”
Where Dwight Gooden, floyd Youmans, Vance Lovelace, Gary Shefeld and Derek
thrived until the 1930s. Continual Bell learned to play the game.
labor unrest and the introduction Central Avenue
of machines that could make in a Most of the structures that comprised the city’s historically black business district,
minute what men and women made from Cass Street to Seventh Avenue, are gone now, the result of neglect, urban
renewal and fres set during a civil rights disturbance in 1968. But memories by hand with care sent the industry
remain vivid of restaurants and movie theaters, nightclubs and ofces.
into a spin.
fort foster Historic Site at Hillsborough River State Park
But the descendants of the cigar workers remained, assimilated and 15402 U.S. Hwy. 301 N., Thonotosassa
prospered. One does not have to go very far to meet someone whose 813-987-6771
www.foridastateparks.org/hillsboroughrivergrandparents worked in the cigar factories and who still speaks Spanish – and
Within Hillsborough River State Park is a replica of fort foster, a Second Seminole maybe Italian as well. This frst generation of Hispanics prefers to be called
War military fort built in 1836 and occupied until 1838. The fort guarded a military
Latin, not Hispanic, because of the presence of Italians, who are not Hispanic. bridge over the Hillsborough River. An interpretive center contains exhibits on the
They welcomed into Tampa the second wave of Hispanic arrivals. fort, Seminoles, and Second Seminole War.
The Hispanic population of the Bay area more than tripled by the start Helping Hand Day Nursery
6406 N. 43rd St., Tampa of the 21st Century due to the arrival of people from other Hispanic
813-849-1487
communities in the U.S., and from virtually every country in Central and
Some of Tampa’s best known political
South America, as well as the largely Mexican migrant workers who work fgures were students here. The nursery
on farms east of Tampa. began in 1924 and thrived in the city’s
historically black business district, along Ybor City changed, too. It fell into neglect in the years after the
Central Avenue.
collapse of the cigar industry. Some of the neighborhood was demolished
The Jackson House
during urban renewal and interstate construction. But revival eventually 851 E. Zack St., Tampa
came. The neighborhood was put on the National Register of Historic Places. 813-228-9376
Artists discovered the funky appeal of the largely abandoned Seventh The house was built around 1900 as a family’s home, but it was eventually
transformed into a 24 room hotel for black visitors who, no matter how celebrated Avenue. They were displaced by developers who brought restaurants,
there were, could not get a room elsewhere in town.
nightclubs, and new housing to the neighborhood, the new Ybor.
La Union Martí-Maceo
Nearby West Tampa features an area known to locals as “Boliche 1226 E. 7th Ave., Tampa
Boulevard,” a name given due to the many restaurants located there which 813-223-6188
serve the popular Cuban dish consisting of eye round roast stufed with The club, which was founded in 1900, provided medical and other support services
to the Afro-Cuban cigar workers who were barred by the practice of segregation of chorizo sausages simmered in a tomato sauce base. To fnd just about
participating in the other Spanish and Italian clubs that cared for Ybor City’s cigar
anything you need with a Hispanic favor, simply drive down Armenia Avenue workers. The club was named for Cuban patriot Jose Martí, who was white, and
or Columbus Drive between MacDill Avenue and Dale Mabry Highway. General Antonio Maceo, who was black. Both were killed in the mid-1890s.
North franklin Street Historic District Bealsville
Roughly bordered by florida Ave., E. fortune St., franklin St. and Glover School
E. Harrison St., Tampa 5104 Horton Rd., north of Hwy. 60, Plant City
813-274-8920 813-737-3245
A sparsely settled area of private wood frame dwellings and businesses, this This part of Hillsborough County, seven miles south of Plant City, was settled in
neighborhood formed around 1900 and reached its peak during the 1930s. A 1865 by freed slaves. The frst of fve churches, Antioch Baptist, was opened in
segregated area until the 1960s, the f.W. Woolworth Department store was 1868. A wooden one-room school house was built in 1933. Two other buildings
located at the corner off ranklin and Polk Streets and was the site of sit-ins in were added in the 1940s, but the school was eventually closed. It operates today
late february 1960 by the NAACP and students from Tampa’s Middleton and as a community center.
Blake High Schools and from Booker T. Washington Junior High School. Today
the building is vacant but has been designated a local historic structure and is Pinellas Countyscheduled for redevelopment.
oaklawn Cemetery
1915 Union Academy
Morgan and Jeferson Streets, Tampa
Heritage Village
813-274-8615
11909 125th Street N., Largo
Opened in 1859, this was Tampa’s frst public cemetery. Perhaps its most 727-582-2123
remarkable grave is that of the white man, John Ashley, the city’s frst clerk,
This school, moved to its current site from Tarpon Springs, was one of the frst
and his black slave Nancy, who lived as common-law husband and wife, and are
“Negro schools” built in Pinellas County.
buried together here.
Anderson-Narváez Mound at Jungle Prada Mound Park
St. Paul AME Church
1700 Park St. N., St. Petersburg
506 E. Harrison St., Tampa
727-347-0354
The church dates back to 1870. It was the setting for many gatherings of www.sacredlands.info
civil rights campaigners, and the church has preserved its rich history with
Named after the 600-man Narváez expedition believed to have landed here in photographs of many people who visited and served there.
1528, the public portion of the multi-mound site overlooks Boca Ciega Bay. The
St. Peter Claver School private portion, owned by the Anderson family, contains a 10-foot deep archaeo -
1401 Governor St., Tampa logical test pit that looks down into the heart of the mound.
813-224-0865
Bethel AME Church
The school, opened in 1894 in downtown, was burned down by white supremacists a 912 3rd Ave. N., St. Petersburg
year after it opened. It was rebuilt in its present location and remains the oldest black 727-822-2089
school in the county.
This is the frst and oldest continuing predominantly African-American church and
Upper Tampa Bay Park Archaeological District denomination in the city. The church was such a fxture of the community around it
8001 Double Branch Rd. (of State Road 580 on Old Tampa Bay), Tampa that the neighborhood came to be known as Methodist Town, a name that stuck until
813-855-1765 the mid 1970s.
www.hillsboroughcounty.org/parks/parkservices/regionalparks.cfm
Johnnie Ruth Clark Health Center at the
This 2,144-acre park and preserve features an archaeological district within the Historic Mercy Hospital Campus
park, with 18 sites that date from 500 to 4,000 years ago and are associated 1344 22nd St. S. , St. Petersburg
with the Manasota Culture. The interpretive building houses exhibits on the
The community center is on the site of St. Petersburg’s only hospital for blacks, archaeological district.
Mercy Hospital, which operated from 1923 until 1966. The hospital was the site for
Plant City numerous civil rights demonstrations on behalf of better health care for blacks in
Bing Rooming House the 1960s.
205 Allen St., Plant City
Manhattan Casino813-737-3245 (private)
642 22nd Street S., St. Petersburg
The rooming house was built in 1926 as a welcome rest for black travelers. The Bing 727-893-7539
family continued to run the rooming house until 1975. Plans call for it to be turned
Although now closed for public use and owned by the City of St. Petersburg, the
into a community museum displaying local African-American history and artifacts.
casino was the place to go to see the greatest black entertainers when they came