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Flying Wing Aerodynamics Studies at ONERA and DLR

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Niveau: Supérieur, Doctorat, Bac+8
Flying Wing Aerodynamics Studies at ONERA and DLR Bruno Mialon () ONERA, Applied Aerodynamics Department F-92320 Châtillon, France Dr. Martin Hepperle () DLR, Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology D-38022 Braunschweig, Germany Abstract The paper presents the aerodynamics studies carried out at DLR and ONERA on Integrated Wing Fuselage (Flying Wing) configurations. Three subjects are ad- dressed: performance optimization, experimental low speed database for handling- quality predictions and preparation of high-speed testing. The main results ob- tained today on these on-going activities are presented. Introduction The Flying Wing is one possible configuration for large capacity aircraft which promises higher efficiency than conventional configurations [1], [2], [3]. While aircraft using the classical wing-tailplane arrangement have been developed con- tinuously over nearly one century, the knowledge about unconventional configura- tions like Flying Wings is much more limited. While being very attractive at a first look, many challenges are still to be solved in areas like aerodynamic optimiza- tion, cabin layout, structural design, flight control and handling qualities. There- fore research on Flying Wing aircraft has been a topic for the work performed at the French and German research establishments (ONERA and DLR). Both estab- lishments are contributing to European projects like VELA and the new NACRE project, which are partially funded by the European Commission.

  • structural design

  • find optimum

  • drag has

  • typical result

  • optimum lift

  • shape optimization

  • aircraft

  • friction drag

  • derivatives fairly


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Flying Wing Aerodynamics Studies at ONERA and DLR
Bruno Mialon (Bruno.Mialon@onera.fr) ONERA, Applied Aerodynamics Department F-92320 Chtillon, France Dr. Martin Hepperle (Martin.Hepperle@dlr.de) DLR, Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology D-38022 Braunschweig, Germany
Abstract The paper presents the aerodynamics studies carried out at DLR and ONERA on Integrated Wing Fuselage (Flying Wing) configurations. Three subjects are ad-dressed: performance optimization, experimental low speed database for handling-quality predictions and preparation of high-speed testing. The main results ob-tained today on these on-going activities are presented.
Introduction The Flying Wing is one possible configuration for large capacity aircraft which promises higher efficiency than conventional configurations[1], [2], [3]. While aircraft using the classical wing-tailplane arrangement have been developed con-tinuously over nearly one century, the knowledge about unconventional configura-tions like Flying Wings is much more limited. While being very attractive at a first look, many challenges are still to be solved in areas like aerodynamic optimiza-tion, cabin layout, structural design, flight control and handling qualities. There-fore research on Flying Wing aircraft has been a topic for the work performed at the French and German research establishments (ONERA and DLR). Both estab-lishments are contributing to European projects like VELA and the new NACRE project, which are partially funded by the European Commission. Additional work for Flying Wing aircraft has been performed in national as well as internal pro-jects. Flying Wing aircraft have been a topic for many years at DLR. Support for the sailplane SB-13, gave first insights into problems associated with Flying Wing aircraft. Besides practical design considerations, many peculiarities of these air-craft have been examined and solved. DLR contributed to the MOB project [4]. Flying Wing aircraft have also been covered by conceptual design studies for passenger carrying aircraft as well as for freight and military transport aircraft [5]. At ONERA, first work dedicated to Flying Wing aircraft focused on aerodynamic shape design and has lead to a family of airfoils adapted to thick and weakly loaded center-bodies [6]. Investigations on handling qualities assessment and parametric structural design have also been launched. Conceptual design of a HALE flying wing has been carried out in the CAPECON project, related to UAV Civil Application.