Susceptibility of several sahelian Acacia to Meloidogyne javanica Treub Chitw

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Niveau: Supérieur, Doctorat, Bac+8
Susceptibility of several sahelian Acacia to Meloidogyne javanica (Treub) Chitw. R. DUPONNOIS1, *, K. SENGHOR2, J. THIOULOUSE3 and A. M. BÂ4 1 IRD, Laboratoire de Biopédologie, B.P. 1386, Dakar, Sénégal; 2 Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Département de Biologie Animale, Dakar, Sénégal; 3 CNRS, UMR 5558, Université Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; 4 ISRA. DRPF. BP. 2312, Route de Hann, Dakar, Sénégal (*Author for correspondence: E-mail: ) Key words: Acacia spp., pathogenicity, Rhizobium Abstract. Four Acacia species were tested for their susceptibility to the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, commonly found in sahelian areas. Faidherbia albida and Acacia senegal were resistant to this nematode. On the contrary, A. raddiana, A. nilotica and A. mangium were susceptible. Among these three species, the growth of A. nilotica and A. mangium was inhib- ited by M. javanica but A. raddiana was tolerant. The rhizobial symbiosis with F. albida and A. senegal was stimulated by the nematode. The population build-up of the root-knot nematode induced by tree species in agroforestry systems is discussed. Introduction The years of drought and over-exploitation of the natural ressources have involved a dramatic deforestation in all sahelian regions of West Africa.

  • root nodules

  • root-knot nematodes

  • nodules per

  • sandy soil

  • rotten root

  • plant

  • acacia species

  • inoculum gall

  • australian acacia


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Agroforestry Systems46: 123Ð130, 1999. Ó1999Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.
Susceptibility of several sahelianAcaciatoMeloidogyne javanica(Treub) Chitw.
1, 2 3 4 * R. DUPONNOIS , K. SENGHOR , J. THIOULOUSE and A. M. B¬ 1 2 IRD, Laboratoire de BiopÈdologie, B.P. 1386, Dakar, SÈnÈgal; UniversitÈ Cheikh Anta Diop, 3 DÈpartement de Biologie Animale, Dakar, SÈnÈgal; CNRS, UMR 5558, UniversitÈ Lyon 1, 4 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; ISRA. DRPF. BP. 2312, Route de Hann, Dakar, SÈnÈgal (*Author for correspondence: E-mail: Robin.Duponnois@ird.sn)
Key words:Acaciaspp., pathogenicity,Rhizobium
Abstract.FourAcaciaspecies were tested for their susceptibility to the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, commonly found in sahelian areas.Faidherbia albidaandAcacia senegal were resistant to this nematode. On the contrary,A. raddiana,A. niloticaandA. mangiumwere susceptible. Among these three species, the growth ofA. niloticaandA. mangiumwas inhib-ited byM. javanicabutA. raddianawas tolerant. The rhizobial symbiosis withF. albidaand A. senegalwas stimulated by the nematode. The population build-up of the root-knot nematode induced by tree species in agroforestry systems is discussed.
Introduction
The years of drought and over-exploitation of the natural ressources have involved a dramatic deforestation in all sahelian regions of West Africa. In order to rehabilitate these areas, different solutions have been proposed, and in particular, the cultural practice of agroforestry. The choice of tree species in these agricultural systems must be based on the following properties: (i) good growth on low fertility and arid soils, (ii) source of organic matter for the cultivated soils and, (iii) resistance to the development of pathogenic organisms. Leguminous tree species such asAcaciacould be good candi-dates to be associated with annual plants. They are abundant in savanas and arid regions around the world. They can grow in soils very deficient in nitrogen because of their nitrogen fixing property. This nitrogen is returned to the soil by the natural loss of leaves which improves the soil fertility. However the pathogenic microorganisms which can be enhanced by these tree species in agroforestry systems are relatively unknown. In particular, plant-parasitic nematodes are a cosmopolitan and important problem affecting the production of subtropical and tropical crops (Johnson and Fassuliotis, 1984). The root-knot nematodes can parasite a large variety of vegetable crops. Although it is known thatAcaciaspecies are hosts forMeloidogynespp. (Duponnois et al., 1997a), the susceptibility of these tree species to infesta-tion by root-knot nematodes has been rarely assessed. Some works have been focussed to this problem and it is now well established that some Australian acacias (i.e.A. holosericea,A. mangium) and an African acacia (A. seyal)