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Niveau: Secondaire, Lycée
Public cible 1e / Écouter : B1+ ; Parler (IO) : B1Séquence 4 Taxi CCTV Un nouveau système de vidéosurveillance est sur le point d'être installé dans les taxis de la ville d'Oxford, en Angleterre. Cette nouvelle bouleverse les esprits et crée un sentiment partagé au sein des usagers, dont la plupart pensent que cette mesure constituerait un manquement au respect de la vie privée. Transcript Sky News reporter on camera, Michele Clifford: These days we're all used to being watched on the outside. But if you're in Oxford in the future, beware, that scrutiny might not actually end when you're inside a taxi. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford: When the ignition goes on, so will a camera and microphone, able to capture every word, every bit of action in the back of the cab. Taxi driver, Maamoun Aisahli: To have a camera installed in your car is a good idea if you have evide..., uh well, if you have incidents and then it's a good evidence [sic] for you and it's for the safety of the driver and the passenger. It's so good to have the camera. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford: With drink often fuelling violence and bad behaviour, it's the growing threat, particularly at night, which a council here says makes the move necessary.

  • taxi

  • sujets de la vie quotidienne

  • peut

  • after watching

  • contrôle de la compréhension par les indices contextuels

  • document d'anticipation du sujet

  • sujets familiers

  • manuels de lycée ?

  • séquence sur l'installation de caméras de videosurveillance dans les taxis


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Published 01 June 2012
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Language English
Document size 2 MB
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Taxi CCTV
Public cible
e 1 /Écouter : B1+ ; Parler (IO) : B1
Un nouveau système de vidéosurveillance est sur le point d’être installé dans les taxis de la ville d’Oxford, en Angleterre. Cette nouvelle bouleverse les esprits et crée un sentiment partagé au sein des usagers, dont la plupart pensent que cette mesure constituerait un manquement au respect de la vie privée.
Transcript Sky News reporter on camera, Michele Clifford:These days we’re all used to being watched on the outside. But if you’re in Oxford in the future, beware, that scrutiny might not actually end when you’re inside a taxi. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford:When the ignition goes on, so will a camera and microphone, able to capture every word, every bit of action in the back of the cab. Taxi driver, Maamoun Aisahli:To have a camera installed in your car is a good idea if you have evide..., uh well, if you have incidents and then it’s a good evidence [sic] for you and it’s for the safety of the driver and the passenger. It’s so good to have the camera. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford:With drink often fuelling violence and bad behaviour, it’s the growing threat, particularly at night, which a council here says makes the move necessary. But it insists, there will be no real breech of privacy, data will be encrypted, only accessed by the police or council if complaints arise. Fears of drivers watching footage back, or even flogging it on, are unfounded. Oxford City Councillor, Colin Cook:I suspect if they had the resources of GCHQ and spy networks, then they might be able to break the encryption. But I suspect with Oxford cab drivers they’re not up to that. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford:But not everyone is so at home with the spread of surveillance to more intimate settings. If the plan goes ahead, cameras will be installed in more than 600 Oxford cabs. Drivers will keep audio and images for 28 days. Could the temptation be too great?A celebrity assignation in the back, a politician sharing state secrets, an office affair. Big Brother Watch, Nick Pickles:If you’re a celebrity or a public figure and you’re in the back of the taxi, the taxi driver now has video and audio footage of everything that’s gone on there, and they could sell that on, and as I say for doing they can’t go to prison. They could only be fined and often the fines that have been handed out, have been quite small. So the deterrent there doesn’t really exist. But for every everyday journeys and members of the public, the same risk exists. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford:Notices in cabs will alert passengers to the fact that their every move or utterance will be recorded. But on a boozy Friday night or a busy Monday morning, will they take note? First person interviewed:I don’t think anything should come out of it, unless you are having an affair then. That might be a problem. Second person interviewed:We shouldn’t really be able to know what people are talking about or this, I don’t know, just invading our privacy. Third person interviewed:I’d feel uncomfortable, to be honest. Oh I wouldn’t say anything in the back of a cab. I’d be quiet. Sky News reporter, Michele Clifford:But if your strategy is to wait until the engine’s turned off, before criticising the boss, be warned. The recordings will last until thirty minutes after. Michele Clifford, Sky News, Oxford.
Anglais/ Lycée – post-bac / nº 24 / avril-juin 2012
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