AAWE WORKING PAPER No. 21
6 Pages
English
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AAWE WORKING PAPER No. 21

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Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
6 Pages
English

Description

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF WINE ECONOMISTS AAWE WORKING PAPER No. 21 OUR SAVIORS MAY NOT SPEAK SPANISH: CHANGING MARKETS AND STRATEGIES IN ARGENTINIA'S WINE REVOLUTION, 1990-2008 Steve Stein August 2008
  • argentina to the forefront of the modern winemaking revolution
  • export
  • great britain
  • argentina
  • international markets
  • wines
  • industry
  • wine

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Language English
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Shapes Galore Mary Alice Formo Nelson County Public Schools
Topic:geometry, plane and solid shapes Overview The student will compare and contrast various solid geometric shapes by utilizing knowledge of plane shapes, faces, corners and edges.
Grades2 - 4
Time Allotment One 75-minute period
Learning Objectives On completion of this lesson students will be able to: €identify basic geometric plane shapes (square, rectangle, triangle, circle) €identify basic geometric solid shapes (cube, rectangular prism, pyramid, sphere, cone, and cylinder) €describe a geometric solid shape using terms such as face, corner, and edge €compare and contrast features of geometric solids
This lesson addresses Va. SOLs math 2.20, 2.22, 3.18, 4.17
Media Components €Computer with Internet access and LCD projector for large group €Classroom computers or lab with Internet access €Mathica’s Mathshop: Wicked Weather Solid Shapes €Website: IlluminationNCTM http://illuminations.nctm.org/imath/3-5/GeometricSolids/Geosolids2.html
Materials and Student Handouts €(square,Four sheets of paper- one of the following shapes on each sheet rectangle, circle, triangle) €Models of basic geometric solids(cube, rectangular prism, pyramid, sphere, cylinder) €Student worksheets- one copy per student of each pattern for a cube and a pyramid (attached) €13 questions worksheet from website-one per student
Teacher Preparations €Draw a square on one sheet of paper, a rectangle on another, a circle on the third sheet and a triangle on the fourth sheet of paper €Make a copy of each worksheet ( cube and pyramid) for each student €Cue video €Bookmark or PortaPortal website
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€Go to the website and print out the 13 questions to make copies for students. €Arrange for computer lab, if necessary.
Warm Up Activity -Which Shape Will I Be? Focus:(The students stand in the center of the room. The teacher placestwoof the plane shapes cards (triangle, circle, square, rectangle) in the room – one card on each side of the room.)Which shape would you like to be? Stand on the side of the room with that shape. Activity: The students move to one side of the room or the other depending on their preference. Follow-up:The teacher then asks several of the students to explain (justify) their selection. This activity can then be repeated using the following combinations- circle-square, triangle-rectangle, circle-rectangle, circle-square, triangle-square, rectangle-square)
Introductory Activities -“What else in the world is shaped like this?” 1. Focus:(Group the students into five cooperative learning groups. Hand each group one of the solid geometric shapes, but do not name the solid.)Look carefully at the shape for your group. Now look around the classroom and make a list of objects in the classroom that look like your geometric solid. Activity:Allow two or three minutes for the groups to make their lists. Follow-up:Give the groups time to share their lists with the class.
2. Focus:Now I want you to continue your lists on your group by writing down other objects that you know that have the same shape. (Encourage them to think of objects at home, in stores, in the neighborhoods.) Activity:Allow five minutes. Follow-up:The teacher quickly reviews the information that each group has gathered. The teacher holds up the geometric solid and each student in the group names one object from the group list.
Learning Activities 1. Focus:The video that you are going to watch will tell you the name of each solid shape. (The teacher introduces the vocabulary words- faces, corners, edges.) Let’s watch the video to learn how to count faces, corners, and edges. Play:The elf has a tray ofMathica’s Mathshop- Wicked Weather- Solid Shapes geometric solid shapes and is encouraged to play a game of finding two shapes that are similar but different. Pause/Stop:elf is comparing a cube and a pyramid.)1:03 (The Follow-up:Why is a square-based pyramid(the flat surface of a shape)What is a face? different from a cube?
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2. Focus:How many faces does a cube have? Play:The elf will talk about faces and begin to count the faces of a cube. Pause:2:19 (Elfis holding cube) Follow-up: Discuss the number of faces on a cube. Then count the faces as the clip progresses and highlights each face of the cube. Pause again when all the faces are counted.
3. Focus:Watch the video to see how we can compare and contrast the corners of a triangular prism with a hexagonal prism. Play:The elf will study a triangular prism and a hexagonal prism and discuss shapes of the faces and corners of these shapes. Pause:3:13 Follow-up:What is the same about a cylinder and a hexagonal prism?What is different about a cylinder and a hexagonal prism?
Post Viewing Activities Focus:In your group, I wantLet’s look again at the geometric shape your group has. you to count the faces, the corners, and the edges.When you are ready, one person from your group will get up and count each feature out loud for us. Activity:Allow groups time to count each feature. Follow-up:Have one student from each group stand up, hold up the geometric solid, name the solid and tell how many faces that shape has.Have another student in each group stand up, name the solid and tell how many corners the shape has.Have a third group member stand, name the solid, and tell how many edges. note:If any of the groups has miscounted the feature for their shape, the teacher should hold up the shape and have the class count the faces, edges or corners together as the teacher touches each feature.
Culminating Activities Note:This activity should be demonstrated on the classroom computer, then used as an individual exploration activity in the computer lab. 1. Theteacher accesses the following website to review the definitions of face, edge, and corner.http://illuminationshttp.nctm.org/imath/3-5/GeometricSolids/Geosolids2.html
2.The teacher selects “Click to use the Tools” bar. When the shape screen comes up, the teacher selects the cube by clicking “New Shape” until the cube is on the screen. The questions will lead in a discovery approach to learning about the shape. The directions are in the question section to explain how to color each face for easier counting and how to highlight each corner or edge to count these features. The shape can be rotated for ease in viewing all perspectives. The size of the shape can be altered by sliding the button on the right side of the shape screen to increase or decrease the size of the shape.
Focus:Now that I have shown you what I want you to do, you should go ahead and use
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the cube to answer the questions on your worksheet. Activity:Allow students time to work with the shape (cube) and to answer the questions. Be aware of students with special needs and either be available to assist them or pair them with a more capable student. Follow-up:When all students have completed the worksheet, come back together to share answers and to correct any wrong answers or misinformation.
Assessment €An informal assessment should be done throughout the lesson when students are counting faces, edges, and corners. €The students will choose a worksheet to create either a pyramid or a cube. Allow time for the students to cut out and construct the solid shape. The students will then discuss these two shapes. The teacher will draw a Venn Diagram on the board and the students will contribute ideas of how a cube and a pyramid are alike and how they are different.
Community Connections €Shape Hunt:The student will create and take home a sheet listing the basic solid shapes as a header for each column on the paper. The student will look around his house and try to find everyday objects that correspond to the various geometric solid shapes that have been studied and write the object’s name under the correct heading.
Cross-Curricular Extensions Art €Create a mobile using various geometric shapes that they have created with paper models €Observe shapes that are within other shapes €Create geometric shapes with straws & pipe cleaners. Science €Observe rock and crystal formations and use their knowledge of solid shapes to describe what they see. Math €Compare the volume of solid shapes by using plastic models that will hold liquid or a solid like rice.
About the Author Mary Alice Formo is a second grade teacher at Tye River Elementary School in Nelson County, Virginia.
This lesson was written as part of the Fall 2003 WVPT NTTI for the Virginia Enhancing Education Through Technology Ed Tech Grant awarded to the Shenandoah Valley Technology Consortium (SVTC).
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