History of Egypt, Chald?a, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of 12)
179 Pages
English

History of Egypt, Chald?a, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of 12)

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of History Of Egypt, Chald a, Syria, �Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of 12), by G. MasperoThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: History Of Egypt, Chald a, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of� 12)Author: G. MasperoEditor: A.H. SayceTranslator: M.L. McClureRelease Date: December 16, 2005 [EBook #17327]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF EGYPT, CHALD A� ***Produced by David Widger[Illustration: Spines][Illustration: Cover]HISTORY OF EGYPT CHALDEA, SYRIA, BABYLONIA, AND ASSYRIABy G. MASPERO, Honorable Doctor of Civil Laws, and Fellow of Queen'sCollege, Oxford; Member of the Institute and Professor at the College ofFranceEdited by A. H. SAYCE, Professor of Assyriology, OxfordTranslated by M. L. McCLURE, Member of the Committee of the EgyptExploration FundCONTAINING OVER TWELVE HUNDRED COLORED PLATES AND ILLUSTRATIONSVolume VII.LONDONTHE GROLIER SOCIETYPUBLISHERS[Illustration: 001.jpg Frontispiece]/* Slumber Song--After painting bv P. Grot. Johann*/[Illustration: Titlepage][Illustration: 002.jpg PAGE IMAGE]_THE ASSYRIAN REVIVAL AND THE STRUGGLE FOR SYRIA__ASSUR-NAZIR-PAL (885-860 B.C.) AND SHALMANESER III. (860-825 B.C ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of History Of Egypt, Chald a, Syria, � Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of 12), by G. Maspero This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: History Of Egypt, Chald a, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of� 12) Author: G. Maspero Editor: A.H. Sayce Translator: M.L. McClure Release Date: December 16, 2005 [EBook #17327] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF EGYPT, CHALD A� *** Produced by David Widger [Illustration: Spines] [Illustration: Cover] HISTORY OF EGYPT CHALDEA, SYRIA, BABYLONIA, AND ASSYRIA By G. MASPERO, Honorable Doctor of Civil Laws, and Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford; Member of the Institute and Professor at the College of France Edited by A. H. SAYCE, Professor of Assyriology, Oxford Translated by M. L. McCLURE, Member of the Committee of the Egypt Exploration Fund CONTAINING OVER TWELVE HUNDRED COLORED PLATES AND ILLUSTRATIONS Volume VII. LONDON THE GROLIER SOCIETY PUBLISHERS [Illustration: 001.jpg Frontispiece] /* Slumber Song--After painting bv P. Grot. Johann */ [Illustration: Titlepage] [Illustration: 002.jpg PAGE IMAGE] _THE ASSYRIAN REVIVAL AND THE STRUGGLE FOR SYRIA_ _ASSUR-NAZIR-PAL (885-860 B.C.) AND SHALMANESER III. (860-825 B.C.)--THE KINGDOM OF URARTU AND ITS CONQUERING PRINCES: MENUAS AND ARGISTIS._ _The line of Assyrian kings after Assurirba, and the Babylonian dynasties: the war between Ramm n-nir ri III. and Shamash-mudammiq; his � � victories over Babylon; Tukulti-ninip II. (890-885 B.C.)--The empire at the accession of Assur-nazir-pal: the Assyrian army and the progress of military tactics; cavalry, military engines; the condition of Assyria's neighbours, methods of Assyrian conquest._ _The first campaigns of Assur-nazir-pal in Nairi and on the Khabur (885-882 B.C.): Zamua reduced to an Assyrian province (881 B.C.)--The fourth campaign in Na ri and the war on the Euphrates (880 B.C.); the � first conquest of BU-Adini--Northern Syria at the opening of the IXth century: its civilisation, arts, army, and religion--The submission of the Hittite states and of the Patina: the Assyrians reach the Mediterranean._ _The empire after the wars of Assur-nazir-pal--Building of the palace at Calah: Assyrian architecture and sculpture in the IXth century--The tunnel of Negub and the palace of Balaw t--The last years of � Assur-nazir-pal: His campaign of the year 867 in Na ri--The death of � Assur-nazir-pal (860 B.C.); his character._ _Shalmaneser III. (860-825 B.C.): the state of the empire at his accession--Urartu: its physical features, races, towns, temples, its deities--Shalmaneser's first campaign in Urartu: he penetrates as far as Lake Van (860 B.C.)--The conquest of B t-Adini and of Na ri (859-855 � � B.C.)_ _The attack on Damascus: the battle of Qarqar (854 B.C.) and the war against Babylon (852-851 B.C.)--The alliance between Judah and Israel, the death of Ahab (853 B.C.); Damascus successfully resists the attacks of Assyria (849-846 B.C.)--Moab delivered from Israel, Mesha; the death of Ben-hadad (Adadidri) and the accession of Hazael; the fall of the house of Omri-Jehu (843 B.C.)--The defeat of Hazael and the homage of Jehu (842-839 B.C.). Wars in Cilicia and in Namri (838-835 B.c.): the last battles of Shalmaneser III.; his building works, the revolt of Assur-dain-pal--Samsi-ramm n IV. (825-812 B.C.), his first three � expeditions, his campaigns against Babylon--Bammdn-nirdri IV, (812-783 B.C.)--Jehu, Athaliah, Joash: the supremacy of Hazael over Israel and Judah--Victory of Bammdn-nirdri over Mari, and the submission of all Syria to the Assyrians (803 B.C.)._ _The growth of Urartu: the conquests of Menuas and Argistis I., their victories over Assyria--Shalmaneser IV. (783-772 B.C.)--Assurd n III. � (772-754 B.C.)--Assur-niruri III. (754-745 B.C.)--The downfall of Assyria and the triumph of Urartu._ [Illustration: 003.jpg PAGE IMAGE] CHAPTER I--THE ASSYRIAN REVIVAL AND THE STRUGGLE FOR SYRIA _Assur-nazir-pal (885-860) and Shalmaneser III. (860-825)--The kingdom of Urartu and its conquering princes: Menuas and Argistis._ Assyria was the first to reappear on the scene of action. Less hampered by an ancient past than Egypt and Chald a, she was the sooner able to � recover her strength after any disastrous crisis, and to assume again the offensive along the whole of her frontier line. Image Drawn by Faucher-Gudin, from a bas-relief at Koyunjik of the time of Sennacherib. The initial cut, which is also by Faucher-Gudin, represents the broken obelisk of Assur- nazir-pal, the bas-reliefs of which are as yet unpublished. During the years immediately following the ephemeral victories and reverses of Assurirba, both the country and its rulers are plunged in the obscurity of oblivion. Two figures at length, though at what date is uncertain, emerge from the darkness--a certain Irbaramm n and an � Assur-nadinakh II., whom we find engaged in building palaces and making � a necropolis. They were followed towards 950 by a Tiglath-pileser II., of whom nothing is known but his name.* He in his turn was succeeded about the year 935 by one Assurd n II., who appears to have concentrated � his energies upon public works, for we hear of him digging a canal to supply his capital with water, restoring the temples and fortifying towns. Kamm n-nir �ri III., who followed him in 912, stands out more� distinctly from the mists which envelop the history of this period; he repaired the gate of the Tigris and the adjoining wall at Assur, he enlarged its principal sanctuary, reduced several rebellious provinces to obedience, and waged a successful warfare against the neighbouring inhabitants of Karduniash. Since the extinction of the race of Nebuchadrezzar I., Babylon had been a prey to civil discord and foreign invasion. The Aramaean tribes mingled with, or contiguous to the remnants of the Cossoans bordering on the Persian gulf, constituted possibly, even at this period, the powerful nation of the Kald .** � * Our only knowledge of Tiglath-pileser II. is from a brick, on which he is mentioned as being the grandfather of Ramm n- � nir ri� II. ** The names Chald a and Chald ans being ordinarily used to� � designate the territory and people of Babylon, I shall employ the term Kaldu or Kald in treating of the Aram an � � tribes who constituted the actual Chald an nation. � It has been supposed, not without probability, that a certain Simashshikhu, Prince of the Country of the Sea, who immediately followed the last scion of the line of Pash ,* was one of their chiefs. He � endeavoured to establish order in the city, and rebuilt the temple of the Sun destroyed by the nomads at Sippar, but at the end of eighteen years he was assassinated. His son E mukinshurnu remained at the head of � affairs some three to six months; Kashshu-nadinakh ruled three or � six years, at the expiration of which a man of the house of B zi, � Eulbar-shakinshumi by name, seized upon the crown.** His dynasty consisted of three members, himself included, and it was overthrown after a duration of twenty years by an Elamite, who held authority for another seven.*** * The name of this prince has been read Simbarshiku by Peiser, a reading adopted by Rost; Simbarshiku would have been shortened into Sibir, and we should have to identify it with that of