A manual of marine zoology for the British Isles

A manual of marine zoology for the British Isles

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-—-—-- MKMICiUUU\iV.IMU u A MANUAL OP M AE IN E ZOOLOGY FOR £fee Isles.§ritisfr :LONDON" HILL.R. BREAD STREETCLAY, PRINTER, A MANUAL or MARINE ZOOLOGY FOR Isles. BY PHILIP HENRY A.L.S.GOSSE, " And God Let the waters forthsaid, thebring abundantly moving creature that hath and God saw that itlife; was Gen. i. 21.good."— 20, PART I. LONDON : JOHN YAN VOORST, PATERNOSTER ROW. MDCCCLV. PREEACE. It is now about that,four-and-twenty years ago, land far remote from I thein a this, began study of with Insects. It is,zoology, beyondsystematic all the most extensive Class of animals,comparison, fact all but boundless but in Iin ; my ignorance andattacked it entire and indivisible, collecting hard to that I found,everythingtrying identify I had not anfrom the Cicindela to the Podura. atom of assistance toward the butidentification, and technicalthe brief, condensed,highly generic " overcharacters of Linnseus's sternaSy Naturae," which I in hand,brains,puzzled my specimens an there was much dark-hour. Of coursemany blunders butthere were ;ness, many egregious did a and I have neverdeal,perseverance good the time in that exercise. The regretted spent were familiarizedforms of that Classgreatleading me in a that never would haveto theyway learned their names fromif I hadbeen, merely coloured or from the oral information engravings, friend and what was of farof some more learned ; VI PREFACE.

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-—-—--
MKMICiUUU\iV.IMUu
A MANUAL
OP
M AE IN E ZOOLOGY
FOR
£fee Isles.§ritisfr:LONDON"
HILL.R. BREAD STREETCLAY, PRINTER,A MANUAL
or
MARINE ZOOLOGY
FOR
Isles.
BY
PHILIP HENRY A.L.S.GOSSE,
" And God Let the waters forthsaid, thebring abundantly
moving creature that hath and God saw that itlife;
was Gen. i. 21.good."— 20,
PART I.
LONDON :
JOHN YAN VOORST, PATERNOSTER ROW.
MDCCCLV.PREEACE.
It is now about that,four-and-twenty years ago,
land far remote from I thein a this, began study
of with Insects. It is,zoology, beyondsystematic
all the most extensive Class of animals,comparison,
fact all but boundless but in Iin
; my ignorance
andattacked it entire and indivisible, collecting
hard to that I found,everythingtrying identify
I had not anfrom the Cicindela to the Podura.
atom of assistance toward the butidentification,
and technicalthe brief, condensed,highly generic
"
overcharacters of Linnseus's sternaSy Naturae,"
which I in hand,brains,puzzled my specimens
an there was much dark-hour. Of coursemany
blunders butthere were ;ness, many egregious
did a and I have neverdeal,perseverance good
the time in that exercise. The
regretted spent
were familiarizedforms of that Classgreatleading
me in a that never would haveto theyway
learned their names fromif I hadbeen, merely
coloured or from the oral information
engravings,
friend and what was of farof some more learned ;VI PREFACE.
I the habit ofvalue,greater acquired comparing
structure with of minute dif-structure, marking
ferences of and became in some measureform,
accustomed to that of without
precision language,
which natural could not exist.historydescriptive*
I have endeavoured in the to
following pages
furnish to the sea-side what the Lin-naturalist,
nean Genera Insectorum were to me. That such
a I needa book is desideratum, hardly say. Many
a time have I been asked to indicate some pub-
lished the student whowork, whereby picks up
a shell from the or a worm from underbeach,
stones at low know what it is that hewater, may
has found. I indeed to the admirablemight point
works of of of ofYarrell, Forbes, Johnston, Baird,
of of and others who have writtenBusk,Bell,
of classes or ButMonographs particular groups.
—this is not what is wanted the information re-
;
is scattered so a number of
quired through large
that a book-case needs to form a ofvolumes, part
the sea-side visitor's toluggage. Moreover, per-
limited income the of these workssons of expense
often forms an bar to theirinsuperable possession.
would not the booksThirty pounds purchase
for the identification of the marine
necessary
animals of Britain while if this sum were ex-
;
of awfulthere would still remainpended, gaps
— ofwhole for thewidth, Classes, recognition
which no hook is extant I need onlyEnglish