A practical method in the modern Greek language

A practical method in the modern Greek language

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r^ PRACTICAL METHODA LANGUAGEIN THE MODERN GREEK BY EUGENE RIZO-RANGABE and LondonBoston, U.S.A., AND PUBLISHERSGINN COMPANY, C()e ^tbenarutn preM 1896 Entered at Stationers' Hall byCopyright, 1896, GINN AND COMPANY all rights reserved TO H. R. H. SOPHIE DUCHESS OF SPARTA ROYAL OF GREECEPRINCESS THIS BOOK IS SPECIAL PERMISSIONBY MOST RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED PREFACE. The Greek has without seriousexisted,language very three thousand In its formalteration, presentnearly years. it differs less from that of than the ofXenophon language differs from that of Homer.Xenophon If intention had been to limit to themy languagemyself now used the educated classes in Greece inby literature, in the in the and I shoulddaily press, pulpit, elsewhere, have had little else to do than to the rules of ancientcopy Greek with some additions and modifications.grammar Some forms of the ancient such as the dual num-language, the the have becomeber, pluperfect, optative, etc., obsolete, and the of the modern idiom is more ana-general spirit than the classical form the is stilllytical ; latter, however, considered as a from whichgeneral treasury everybody and a model to be imitated asmay borrow, constantly as all men of letters.closely possible by But this more is not sufficient forperfect language in Greece and in withcontact.foreigners travelling coming the whose is influenced localpeople, language strongly by as it was even in Inancient times.

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r^PRACTICAL METHODA
LANGUAGEIN THE MODERN GREEK
BY
EUGENE RIZO-RANGABE
and LondonBoston, U.S.A.,
AND PUBLISHERSGINN COMPANY,
C()e ^tbenarutn preM
1896Entered at Stationers' Hall
byCopyright, 1896,
GINN AND COMPANY
all rights reservedTO
H. R. H.
SOPHIE
DUCHESS OF SPARTA
ROYAL OF GREECEPRINCESS
THIS BOOK IS
SPECIAL PERMISSIONBY
MOST RESPECTFULLY DEDICATEDPREFACE.
The Greek has without seriousexisted,language very
three thousand In its formalteration, presentnearly years.
it differs less from that of than the ofXenophon language
differs from that of Homer.Xenophon
If intention had been to limit to themy languagemyself
now used the educated classes in Greece inby literature,
in the in the and I shoulddaily press, pulpit, elsewhere,
have had little else to do than to the rules of ancientcopy
Greek with some additions and modifications.grammar
Some forms of the ancient such as the dual num-language,
the the have becomeber, pluperfect, optative, etc., obsolete,
and the of the modern idiom is more ana-general spirit
than the classical form the is stilllytical ; latter, however,
considered as a from whichgeneral treasury everybody
and a model to be imitated asmay borrow, constantly
as all men of letters.closely possible by
But this more is not sufficient forperfect language
in Greece and in withcontact.foreigners travelling coming
the whose is influenced localpeople, language strongly by
as it was even in Inancient times. theidioms, following
I have been careful to thelessons, therefore, indicate, byVI PREFACE.
abbreviation after the correct formsvlg. (vulgar), placed
used educated the forms of theby people popular language
which it is to one should avoidknow,necessary although
inat leastthem,using writing.
The of the Modern Greek ispronunciation language
not that of the but that used in theancient;certainly
schools of and America is also toEurope open grave
It would at least be of
objection. great practical advantage
if the one now used in Greece were asuniversally adopted,
its would facilitate to scholars theadoption greatly learning
of the modern which is so used in thelanguage, widely
East.
This Method is divided into each con-lessons,thirty
rules of thesetaining rules,grammar, examples illustrating
and exercises. The in secondverb is introduced the
and its withforms are thenlesson, developed alternately
those of the other of All oftheparts speech. principles
Greek toare thus care takengrammar presented, being
forms orthe of thedistinguish politeeverywhere literary
from those of The lessonsthe idiom.language vulgar
are followed which has been so selectedby reading-matter
as to the now used in Greece allrepresent bylanguage
educated both in and in Thepeople writing.speaking
use of more classical forms and constructions in speaking
would to a modern Greek andappear pretentious affected,
while the introduction of words and forms of the vulgar
tolerated in familiar wouldidiom, conversation,although
inbe considered a mark ofcertainly gross ignorance writing
or in
polite speech.