120 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Branching processes in random environment [Elektronische Ressource] / Christian Böinghoff

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
120 Pages
English

Description

Branching Processesin Random EnvironmentDissertationzur Erlangung des Doktorgradesder Naturwissenschaftenvorgelegt beim Fachbereich 12, Informatik und Mathematikder Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universit¨atin Frankfurt am MainvonChristian B¨oinghoffaus Erlenbach am MainBranching Process Z86420200 400 600 800 1000nFrankfurt am Main 2010(D30)log ((Z))10vom Fachbereich 12, Informatik und Mathematik derJohann Wolfgang Goethe-Universit¨at als Dissertation angenommen.Dekan: Prof. Dr. Tobias WethGutachter: Prof. Dr. G¨otz Kersting , Prof. Dr. Anton Wakolbinger und Prof. Dr. Nina GantertDatum der Disputation: 28.02.2011Contents1 Introduction 11.1 Historical remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 The model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Classification and known results for BPREs 72.1 The supercritical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.2 The critical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.3 The subcritical cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122.3.1 The strongly subcritical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122.3.2 The weakly subcritical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 The intermediately subcritical case 193.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2010
Reads 28
Language English
Document size 1 MB

Exrait

Branching Processes
in Random Environment
Dissertation
zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades
der Naturwissenschaften
vorgelegt beim Fachbereich 12, Informatik und Mathematik
der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universit¨at
in Frankfurt am Main
von
Christian B¨oinghoff
aus Erlenbach am Main
Branching Process Z
8
6
4
2
0
200 400 600 800 1000
n
Frankfurt am Main 2010
(D30)
log ((Z))
10vom Fachbereich 12, Informatik und Mathematik der
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universit¨at als Dissertation angenommen.
Dekan: Prof. Dr. Tobias Weth
Gutachter: Prof. Dr. G¨otz Kersting , Prof. Dr. Anton Wakolbinger und Prof. Dr. Nina Gantert
Datum der Disputation: 28.02.2011Contents
1 Introduction 1
1.1 Historical remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 The model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2 Classification and known results for BPREs 7
2.1 The supercritical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.2 The critical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.3 The subcritical cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.3.1 The strongly subcritical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.3.2 The weakly subcritical case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3 The intermediately subcritical case 19
3.1 Introduction and main results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3.2 Conditional limit laws for oscillating random walks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.2.1 A change of measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.2.2 A conditional limit law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.3 Auxiliary results for the BPRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.4 Proof of Theorems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.4.1 Proof of Theorem 3.1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.4.2 Proof of 3.1.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.4.3 Proof of Theorem 3.1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
4 Large deviations 41
4.1 Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.2 Offspring distributions with geometrically bounded tails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.2.1 Two characteristics of Z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.2.2 Proof of Theorem 4.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.3 Heavy-tailed offspring distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.3.1 Main results and interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.3.2 Proof of the lower bound of Theorem 4.3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.3.3 Proof of the upper bound ofm 4.3.1 for β ∈(1,2] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.3.4 Adaptation of the proof of the upper bound for β >2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4.3.5 Proof of Theorem 4.3.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.3.6 Characterization of the rate function ψ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.3.7 Bounds for generating functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.4 Lower deviations: A result for geometric offspring distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.4.1 Main result . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.4.2 Proof of Theorem 4.4.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.5 The quenched approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
4.5.1 Proof of Theorems 4.5.1 and 4.5.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
III CONTENTS
5 Simulation of a conditioned BPRE 89
5.1 Geiger’s construction for Galton-Watson processes in varying environment . . . . . . . . . 89
5.2 Geometric offspring distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.3 Conditioned BPREs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.4 Some results of the simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
6 Perspectives 97
A Technical results 99
A.1 A general form of an inequality due to Paley and Zygmund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
A.2 Slowly varying functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
A.3 Successive differentiation for the composition of functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Bibliography iIII
Acknowledgment
The following PhD-thesis emerged from a joint project with scientists from Germany, Russia and France.
I would also like to express my gratitude to the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Russian
Foundation of Basic Research for financial support (Grant DFG-RFBR 08-01-91954). It is a pleasure to
express gratitude to all people involved in different parts of the project.
1First of all, I am indebted to G¨otz Kersting who supervised this PhD, provided many helpful ideas and
always had time to discuss questions with me. His guidance into the world of branching processes has
been essential for this thesis.
2Secondly, I am very grateful to Vincent Bansaye for the fruitful and enduring collaboration, as well as
´for invitations to the Ecole Polytechnique and his cordial hospitality.
3On the Russian side, I would like to thank Elena Dyakonova, Vladimir Vatutin and Valery Afanasyev
for the good cooperation, many fruitful discussions, the invitations to the Steklov Institute in Moscow,
and in particular for their extraordinary hospitality during two stays in Moscow.
4I am also grateful to Vitali Wachtel for many interesting discussions on BPREs, as well as for quite
practical help with language issues during the time in Moscow.
5I would also like to thank Nina Gantert for fruitful discussions on the large deviations of BPREs in the
quenched approach, as well as for the invitation to Mu¨nster.
During my work in Frankfurt, many people helped me with mathematical, technical or organzational
questions. Among them, I’d especially like to thank our two secretaries, Nicole G¨otting and Anna Weigl-
hofer for their technical support. I’d also like to thank the professors Hermann Dinges, Ralph Neininger,
Gaby Schneider and Anton Wakolbinger for many interesting discussions, especially in the vivid stochas-
tic seminary. I’d also like to thank the other PhD students from the stochastic group for the interesting
exchange of ideas and the good working atmosphere: Margarete Knape, Max Stroh, Henning Sulzbach
and, from statistics, Markus Bingmer who provided very valuable help with a few R problems. I am
grateful to Brooks Ferebee for many useful remarks after talks in our seminary and for providing support
with subtleties of the English language.
I’d also like to thank my family for their enduring support, especially Andreas for carefully looking for
any typos in my PhD-thesis and Ute for carefully reading the pre-final version of the thesis, her advice
and many helpful remarks.
1Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main
2´Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau
3all from Steklov Institute, Moscow
4LMU, Munc¨ hen
5Mun¨ ster UniversityIV AcknowledgementZusammenfassung V
Zusammenfassung
InderfolgendenArbeitwerdenEigenschaftenvonVerzweigungsprozessen in zuf¨alliger Umgebung
(engl. Branching processes in random environment, kurz BPREs) untersucht. Das Modell geht auf
[SW69] und [AK71] zuruc¨ k. Ein BPRE ist ein einfaches mathematisches Modell fu¨r die Entwicklung
6einer Population von apomiktischen Individuen in diskreter Zeit, wobei die Umgebungsbedingungen
einen Einfluß auf den Fortpflanzungserfolg der Individuen haben. Dabei wird angenommen, dass die
Umgebungsbedingungen in den einzelnen Generationen zuf¨allig sind, und zwar unabhangi¨ g und identisch
verteilt von Generation zu Generation. Man denke z.B. an eine Population von Pflanzen mit einem
einj¨ahrigen Zyklus, die in jedem Jahr anderen Witterungsbedingungen ausgesetzt sind, wobei angenom-
men wird, dass diese sich unabh¨angig und identisch verteilt ¨andern.
Genauer bezeichnen wir eine unendliche Folge von unabhangig,¨ identisch verteilten Zufallsvariablen
Q ,Q ,...,dieWerteimRaumΔallerWahrscheinlichkeitsverteilungenaufN annehmen,alseineUmge-1 2 0
bung Π=(Q ,Q ,...). Ein BPRE wird dann wie folgt definiert:1 2
Definition. Sei Π = (Q ,Q ,...). Dann bezeichnen wir (Z ) als Verzweigungsprozess in1 2 n n∈N0
zuf¨alliger Umgebung, falls fur¨ alle z,k ∈ N die Populationsgr¨oße Z in Generation k, gegeben0 k
Z = z und gegeben Π = (q ,q ,...), wie die Summe von z-vielen unabh¨angig, identisch verteiltenk−1 1 2
Zufallsvariablen verteilt ist, d.h.:
L(Z |Z =z,Π=(q ,q ,···)) = L(ξ +···+ξ ) ,k k−1 1 2 1 z
wobei ξ ,ξ ,...,ξ unabh¨angige Zufallsvariablen mit Verteilung q sind.1 2 z k−1
Als Hilfsmittel definiert man die zugeh¨orige Irrfahrt.
Definition. Seien Π=(Q ,Q ,...) eine Umgebung und1 1
∞X
X := log yQ ({y}), n≥1 .n n
y=0
Die Irrfahrt S = (S ,S ,...) mit Anfangszustand S = 0 und Zuw¨achsen X =S −S , n≥ 1, heißt0 1 0 n n n−1
zugeh¨ orige Irrfahrt fu¨r den Prozess (Z ) .n n∈N0
Die zugehorige¨ Irrfahrt bestimmt den Erwartungswert des Prozesses, bedingt auf die Umgebung:
Sn
E[Z |Z ,Π] = Z e f.s.n 0 0
Verzweigungsprozesse in zuf¨alliger Umgebung werden, ¨ahnlich wie gew¨ohnliche Galton-Watson Prozesse,
in superkritische (E[X]> 0), kritische (E[X] = 0) und subkritische Prozesse (E[X]< 0) unterteilt. Kri-
tische und subkritische Prozesse sterben f.s. aus (siehe Kapitel 1).
BereitsindenArbeiten[Koz76]und[Afa80]wirdeininteressantesVerhaltenvonBPREsimsubkritischen
Fallbeschrieben,zunac¨ hstjedochnurfu¨rNachkommenverteilungenmitgebrochen-linearenErzeugenden-
funktionen. IndiesemFalllas¨ stsichdieErzeugendenfunktionvonZ ,bedingtaufdieUmgebung,explizitn
berechnen. ImsubkritischenFallgibtesdreiverschiedeneRegimevonVerzweigungsprozessen, diesichin
¨ ¨derAsymptotikderUberlebenswahrscheinlichkeitundimVerhaltendesProzesses,bedingtaufUberleben
(d.h. bedingt auf {Z > 0}, n ∈ N), unterscheiden. In spate¨ ren Arbeiten, z.B. [GKV03], [AGKV05b],n
[AGKV05a] und [ABKV10] wird dies detailliert beschrieben und unter schwachen Voraussetzungen an
die Nachkommenverteilungen und die Verteilung von X gezeigt. Man unterscheidet den schwach sub-
X Xkritischen (E[Xe ] > 0), den intermedi¨ar subkritischen (E[Xe ] = 0) und den stark subkritischen Fall
X(E[Xe ]<0). Einige bekannte Resultate der letzten Jahre werden in Kapitel 2 vorgestellt.
¨In [AGKV05b] wird gezeigt, dass Z im stark subkritischen Fall, bedingt auf Uberleben, zu allen Zeiten
¨kleinbleibtundimGrenzwertalsMarkovkettebeschriebenwerdenkann. DieUberlebenswahrscheinlichkeit
X n
P(Z >0) f¨allt exponentiell schnell ab, und zwar mit OrdnungE[e ] .n
Der schwach subkritische Fall wird in [ABKV10] beschrieben. Auch in diesem Fall fallt¨ P(Z > 0) ex-n
ponentiell schnell ab, ist aber von derselben Ordnung wie P(min{S ,...,S } ≥ 0). Unter geeigneten0 n
6d.h. sich ungeschlechtlich fortpflanzendenVI Zusammenfassung
Voraussetzungen konvergiert der mit dem Erwartungswert skalierte Verzweigungsprozess, bedingt auf
¨Uberleben, in Verteilung gegen eine Exkursion einer Brown’schen Bewegung. Dies bedeutet, dass Z ,k
bedingt auf {Z > 0}, sowohl fur¨ k nahe Null als auch fur¨ k nahe n beschr¨ankt bleibt. Dazwischenn
nimmt Z sehr große Werte an und folgt seinem Erwartungswert, bis auf eine zuf¨allige Konstante, aufk
v¨ollig deterministische Art und Weise. Hier kommt das starke Gesetz der großen Zahl zum Tragen.
¨DieUntersuchungvonintermedi¨arsubkritischenVerzweigungsprozessen, bedingtaufUberleben, isteiner
der Hauptteile dieser Dissertation. Aufgrund der Bedingung
X
E[Xe ] = 0
bietet es sich fur¨ die Beweise an, einen Maßwechsel durchzufu¨hren, unter welchem die zugehorige¨ Irrfahrt
rekurrent wird. Hierzu definieren wir das Maß P mit Erwartungswert E fu¨r messbare und beschr¨ankte
n nFunktionen Φ:Δ ×R →R durch

−n S −Sn 0E[Φ(Q ,...,Q ,Z ,...,Z )] = γ E Φ(Q ,...,Q ,Z ,...,Z )e1 n 0 n 1 n 0 n
mit

Xγ = E e .
S ist unter P rekurrent, d.h. E[X] = 0. Wir nehmen an, dass die Verteilung von X folgende Regu-
larit¨atsbedingung erfull¨ t:
Annahme 0.1. Die Verteilung von X hat bzgl. P endliche Varianz oder, allgemeiner, liegt im Konver-
genzbereich einer strikt stabilen Verteilung mit Index α∈(1,2]. Zudem sei sie nicht-gitterartig.
AußerdemmusseinegewisseRegularit¨atderNachkommenverteilungenvorausgesetztwerden. Siebetrifft
das sogenannte standardisierte zweite Moment von Q. Dazu definiert man
∞ .X
2 2
ζ(a) = y Q({y}) m(Q) , a∈N .
y=a
P∞
mit m(Q)= yQ({y}).y=0
Annahme 0.2. Es existieren Konstanten 0<<∞ und a∈N, so dass
+ α+E[(log ζ(a)) ]<∞ .
Wie in der Arbeit sp¨ater ausfuh¨ rlich erkl¨art wird, erful¨ lt eine große Klasse von Verteilungen die obige
Bedingung.
Sei

τ := min 0≤k≤n|S =min{S ,...,S } (1)n k 0 n
der Zeitpunkt des ersten Minimums von (S ,...,S ).0 n
Der folgende Satz wird bereits in [Vat04] gezeigt, jedoch unter etwas st¨arkeren Voraussetzungen.
Satz 0.1. Unter den Annahmen 0.1 und 0.2 gilt
n
P(Z >0) ∼ γ θP(τ =n)n n
fu¨r ein 0<θ<∞.
¨Der n¨achste Satz beschreibt die Anzahl der Zeiten – bedingt aufs Uberleben des Prozesses – zu denen
nur noch genau ein Individuum lebt. Dazu nehmen wir an, dass es mit positiver Wahrscheinlichkeit
Verteilungen gibt, unter welchen ein Individuum mit positiver Wahrscheinlichkeit keine oder genau einen
Nachkommen haben kann:
Annahme 0.3.

E Q({1})Q({0}) > 0 .Zusammenfassung VII
Die Anzahl der Zeitpunkte, zu denen nur noch genau ein Individuum lebt ist dann von der gleichen
Ordnung wie die Anzahl der strikt absteigenden Leiterpunkte einer rekurrenten Irrfahrt, bedingt auf
{τ =n}.n
Satz 0.2. Unter den Annahmen 0.1 bis 0.3 gibt es eine schwach variierende Folge b ,b ,..., so dass1 2
h i