Colonization processes and seed bank dynamics in flood meadows and their implications for ecological restoration [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Sandra Burmeier
128 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Colonization processes and seed bank dynamics in flood meadows and their implications for ecological restoration [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Sandra Burmeier

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
128 Pages
English

Description

Colonization processes and seed bank dynamics in flood meadows and their implications for ecological restoration Colonization processes and seed bank dynamics in flood meadows and their implications for ecological restoration Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades (Dr. rer. nat.) der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen vorgelegt von Dipl.-Biol. Sandra Burmeier Gießen, Mai 2010 Dekanin FB 09: Prof. Dr. Ingrid-Ute Leonhäuser 1. Gutachterin: Prof. Dr. Dr. Annette Otte 2. Gutachter: Prof. Dr. Gerd Esser The research reported in this thesis was carried out at the Institute of Landscape Ecology and Resource Management, Research Centre for Biosystems, Land Use and Nutrition (IFZ), Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany. © 2010 S. Burmeier; all rights reserved. Burmeier, S. 2010. Colonization processes and seed bank dynamics in flood meadows and their implications for ecological restoration. PhD thesis, Justus Liebig University Gie-ßen. The thesis is also available as a book, which is published by AVM (Akademische Ver-lagsgesellschaft München). This thesis is based on the following four papers: 1) Burmeier, S., Eckstein, R.L., Donath, T.W. & Otte, A. (in press) Plant pattern de-velopment during early post-restoration succession in grasslands – a case study of Arabis nemorensis.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2010
Reads 8
Language English
Document size 4 MB

Exrait







Colonization processes and seed bank
dynamics in flood meadows and their
implications for ecological restoration






Colonization processes and seed bank
dynamics in flood meadows and their
implications for ecological restoration


Dissertation
zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades
(Dr. rer. nat.)
der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät
der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

vorgelegt von
Dipl.-Biol. Sandra Burmeier


Gießen, Mai 2010


Dekanin FB 09: Prof. Dr. Ingrid-Ute Leonhäuser
1. Gutachterin: Prof. Dr. Dr. Annette Otte
2. Gutachter: Prof. Dr. Gerd Esser



















The research reported in this thesis was carried out at the Institute of Landscape Ecology
and Resource Management, Research Centre for Biosystems, Land Use and Nutrition
(IFZ), Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany.

© 2010 S. Burmeier; all rights reserved.

Burmeier, S. 2010. Colonization processes and seed bank dynamics in flood meadows
and their implications for ecological restoration. PhD thesis, Justus Liebig University Gie-
ßen.

The thesis is also available as a book, which is published by AVM (Akademische Ver-
lagsgesellschaft München).

This thesis is based on the following four papers:

1) Burmeier, S., Eckstein, R.L., Donath, T.W. & Otte, A. (in press) Plant pattern de-
velopment during early post-restoration succession in grasslands – a case study
of Arabis nemorensis. Restoration Ecology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2010.
00668.x.

2) Burmeier, S., Eckstein, R.L., Otte, A. & Donath, T.W. (in press) Spatially-restricted
plant material application creates colonization initials for flood-meadow species.
Biological Conservation, DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2010.08.018.

3) Burmeier, S., Eckstein, R.L., Otte, A. & Donath, T.W. (2010) Desiccation cracks
act as natural seed traps in flood-meadow systems. Plant and Soil 333: 351-364.

4) Burmeier, S., Donath, T.W., Otte, A. & Eckstein, R.L. (2010) Rapid burial has dif-
ferential effects on germination and emergence of small- and large-seeded herba-
ceous plant species. Seed Science Research 20: 189-200.


In paper 1, I had the main responsibility for field work, data analysis and writing while the
co-authors were involved in planning the study and gave helpful comments. In paper 2, 3
and 4, I was responsible for the study design, field work, data analysis and writing. The
co-authors contributed constructive suggestions and helpful comments.


Reprinted with kind permission of Wiley-Blackwell (Paper 1), Elsevier Ltd (Paper 2), Springer
Science and Business Media (Paper 3), and Cambridge Journals (Paper 4).

*****










„Very few people, however, come to appreciate the complexity hid-
den in the soil beneath a grassland community.”

KEVIN J. RICE (1989)








Contents

Chapter 1 Synthesis 9
Chapter 2 Plant pattern development during early post-restoration 29
succession in grasslands – a case study of Arabis
nemorensis
Chapter 3 Spatially-restricted plant material application creates 49
colonization initials for flood-meadow restoration
Chapter 4 Desiccation cracks act as natural seed traps in flood- 71
meadow systems
Chapter 5 Rapid burial has differential effects on germination and 95
emergence of small- and large-seeded herbaceous plant
species
Summary 117
Zusammenfassung 121
Acknowledgments 125
List of publications 127

















Iris spuria flowering in a restored flood meadow SYNTHESIS
CHAPTER1

Colonization processes and seed bank
dynamics in flood meadows and their
implications for ecological restoration: a
synthesis

















This chapter introduces the background and the key concepts underlying this the-
sis, states its aims and objectives and gives an outline of the four manuscripts the
thesis is based on. It presents their main results and conclusions, puts them in a
wider context and highlights the implications for flood-meadow restoration.

9
CHAPTER 1
Introduction
Background
Flood meadows
Flood meadows are typical plant communities of large lowland river valleys in subconti-
nental climatic conditions (Burkart 2001). These environments are highly dynamic and
are characterized by the impacts of flooding events (Beltman et al. 2007), which may
cause severe disturbances and can lead to significant nutrient intakes (Olde Venterink et
al. 2006), but also by regular periods of severe summer drought which, in combination,
account for highly variable soil water potentials (Leyer 2005; Toogood et al. 2008). This
gives rise to distinct plant communities where species of mesic habitats are closely inter-
mingled with species with a high flooding tolerance and species adapted to dry conditions
(Hölzel et al. 2006). From a phytosociological point of view, the alliance Cnidion consti-
tutes the vegetation of flood meadows sensu strictu (Balátová-Tuláčková 1969). How-
ever, ecologically related alliances such as Molinion and Arrhenatherion are often also
associated with flood-meadow communities (Hölzel et al. 2006).
Flood meadows are strongly influenced by human land use, and regular mowing is crucial
for protecting these rare communities and their typical plant and animal species (Ružičk-
ová et al. 2004). Intensified management, abandonment and conversion into arable fields
have caused a drastic decline of flood meadows across Europe since the middle of the
th20 century (Göbel 1995; McDonald 2001; Leyer 2002; Ružičková et al. 2004; Hölzel et
al. 2006). As a result, they now belong to the most threatened plant communities in
Europe (Korneck et al. 1996; Joyce & Wade 1998) and are considered to be of high con-
servation concern – in particular as they harbour many rare and endangered species
(Schnittler & Günther 1999; Burkart 2001; Ružičková et al. 2004).
Larger Central European remnants still occur in the catchments of the rivers Elbe (Re-
decker 2001; Leyer 2002; Härdtle et al. 2006), Oder (Korsch 1999) and Danube (Ružičk-
ová et al. 2004) and along the Northern Upper Rhine (Böger 1991; Göbel 1995). How-
ever, even in these areas fragments have become increasingly isolated (Donath et al.
2003; Van Looy & Meire 2009), which may have severe population genetic conse-
quences for the concerned plant and animal species (Young et al. 1996 and references
therein).
As Cnidion meadows are listed in Appendix 1 of the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/ECC),
all member states are requested to take action to maintain them and, where appropriate,
restore their ‘favourable conservation status’. Restoration of degraded sites could help to
re-connect isolated remnants, decrease the risk of local extinction for typical species and
thus improve the overall conservation status of flood meadows.
Ecological restoration
Ecological restoration is the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has
been degraded, damaged or destroyed (Harris & van Diggelen 2006). It implies directing
ecosystem development towards a target ecosystem by altering and/or accelerating
processes such as dispersal and colonization or community assembly (Palmer et al.
1997; Bakker & Berendse 1999; Bakker et al. 2000). The response of communities and
10