119 Pages
English

Dynamics of water bearing silicate melts as seen by quasielastic neutron scattering at high temperature and pressure [Elektronische Ressource] / Fan Yang

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Description

PHYSIK - DEPARTMENTDynamicsofWaterBearingSilicateMeltsasseenbyQuasielasticNeutronScatteringatHighTemperatureandPressureDissertationvonFanYang¨TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT¨MUNCHENPhysik-DepartmentderTechnischenUniversita¨tMu¨nchenLehrstuhlfu¨rExperimentalphysikIVDynamics of Water Bearing Silicate Melts asseen by Quasielastic Neutron Scatteringat High Temperature and PressureFanYangVollsta¨ndigerAbdruckdervonderFakulta¨tfu¨rPhysikderTechnischenUniversita¨tMu¨nchenzurErlangungdesakademischenGradeseinesDoktorsderNaturwissenschaften(Dr.rer.nat.)genehmigtenDissertationVorsitzender: Univ.-Prof.Dr.R.MetzlerPru¨ferderDissertation:1. Univ.-Prof.Dr.A.Meyer2. Univ.-Prof.Chr.Pfleiderer,Ph.D.Die Dissertation wurde am 29.01.2009 bei der Technischen Universita¨tMu¨nchen eingereicht und durch die Fakulta¨t fu¨r Physik am 03.04.2009angenommen.QitoContentsSummary vZusammenfassung vii1 Introduction and motivation 11.1 Geologicalimportance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 Theglasstransition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.3 Interplayofstructure anddynamicsinsilicatemelts . . . . . . . . . . . . 41.4 Thehydroussilicatesystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71.5 Presentwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Sample synthesis 112.1 Preparationofthedrysilicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112.2 Dissolutionofwater . . . . . .

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2009
Reads 26
Language English
Document size 2 MB

PHYSIK - DEPARTMENT
DynamicsofWaterBearingSilicateMeltsas
seenbyQuasielasticNeutronScattering
atHighTemperatureandPressure
Dissertation
von
FanYang
¨TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT
¨MUNCHENPhysik-Departmentder
TechnischenUniversita¨tMu¨nchen
Lehrstuhlfu¨rExperimentalphysikIV
Dynamics of Water Bearing Silicate Melts as
seen by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering
at High Temperature and Pressure
FanYang
Vollsta¨ndigerAbdruckdervonderFakulta¨tfu¨rPhysikderTechnischen
Universita¨tMu¨nchenzurErlangungdesakademischenGradeseines
DoktorsderNaturwissenschaften(Dr.rer.nat.)
genehmigtenDissertation
Vorsitzender: Univ.-Prof.Dr.R.Metzler
Pru¨ferderDissertation:
1. Univ.-Prof.Dr.A.Meyer
2. Univ.-Prof.Chr.Pfleiderer,Ph.D.
Die Dissertation wurde am 29.01.2009 bei der Technischen Universita¨t
Mu¨nchen eingereicht und durch die Fakulta¨t fu¨r Physik am 03.04.2009
angenommen.
to
QiContents
Summary v
Zusammenfassung vii
1 Introduction and motivation 1
1.1 Geologicalimportance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Theglasstransition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Interplayofstructure anddynamicsinsilicatemelts . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.4 Thehydroussilicatesystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5 Presentwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2 Sample synthesis 11
2.1 Preparationofthedrysilicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.2 Dissolutionofwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.1 Samplecapsules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.2 Hightemperatureandpressureprocess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3 Samplecharacterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.3.1 Calorimetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.3.2 Dilatometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3 Theoretical background 24
3.1 Neutronscattering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
3.1.1 Basictheory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
3.1.2 Coherent/incoherentscatteringandcorrelationfunctions . . . . 27
3.1.3 Neutronscatteringonliquidsandglasses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.2 Diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.2.1 Diffusioninsimpleliquid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.2.2 Hoppingmodelandanomalousdiffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.3 Modecouplingtheoryandtheglasstransition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.3.1 Basicapproach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.3.2 Structural relaxationprocessesandscalinglaws . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.3.3 SchematicmodelsofglasstransitioninMCT . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
iii4 Sample environment 42
4.1 Basicconcepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.1.1 Highpressurehightemperaturevessel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.1.2 Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2 Construction andoperationoftheautoclave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.2.1 Highpressurecomponents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.2.2 Hightemperaturefurnace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.2.3 OthercomponentsandadaptiontoTOFTOF . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.3 Neutronscatteringcharacteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
5 Neutron scattering experiment 59
5.1 Time-of-flightspectroscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
5.2 Experimentalsetup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
5.3 Reductionofneutrondata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5.4 Neutronbackscatteringspectroscopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
6 Dynamics in hydrous silicate melts 73
6.1 Drysodiumtrisilicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
6.2 Hydroussodiumtrisilicatemelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
6.2.1 Energydomainanalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
6.2.2 Timedomainanalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
6.3 Deuteratedsodiumtrisilicatemelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
6.4 Backscatteringmeasurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
6.5 Othersilicatesystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
7 Outlook 89
7.1 Neutronscatteringexperiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
7.2 Diffusioncouplemeasurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
7.2.1 Ex-situexperiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
7.2.2 Neutronradiography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Appendix 93
A Neutron scattering cross sections 93
B List of neutron scattering experiments 94
List of figures 97
List of tables 99
Acknowledgement 101
Bibliography 103
Declaration of authorship 109
ivSummary
The aims of current thesis are to construct a high temperature high pressure sam-
ple environment for neutron time-of-flight experiments and to study water dynamics
in hydrous silicate melts under high temperature and high pressure conditions with
quasielasticneutronscatteringtechniques.
The understanding of the relaxation behaviour of silicate melts is very important
for many geological processes, especially active volcanism. The addition of water to
silicatescausesadrastic,non-lineardropofthemeltviscosityby5-10ordersofmagni-
tude. Waterisknowntopartiallyreactwithsilicatesuponitsdissolution,whichresults
intwodifferentspeciestobepresentinthesilicates: OH-groups andmolecularwater.
The knowledge of the water dynamics represents an essential key to understand the
meltproperties. However,the dissolution andtransport mechanismsofwaterspecies
insilicatemeltsisstillnotunderstood.
Neutronscatteringtechniquesgiveaccesstoinvestigatedynamicsonmicroscopic
timescales in the order of picoseconds to nanoseconds and on interatomic distances
˚in the A range. The intrinsicq resolution of the quasielastic neutron scattering allows
to study diffusion mechanisms in great detail by analyzing the q dependence of the
scatteringamplitudeandlineshapeofthequasielasticsignal.
Hydroussilicatesamplesarepreparedbyfusionofdrysilicateswithwaterathigh
temperature under high pressure with a total water content of 10 mol%. The charac-
terization of sample glass transition temperatures using calorimetric anddilatometric
methodsshowthatwaterishomogeneouslydissolvedinthesilicateglasses.
To study the hydrous silicates at temperatures higher than their glass transition
temperatures, high pressure in the order of 1-2 kbars is simultaneously required to
suppress water evaporation. Therefore, a high temperature high pressure sample en-
vironment was built which is optimized for the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer
TOFTOF at FRMII.Nb1Zr alloy ischosen asthe cellmaterial. Nbisarefractory class
metalwhichprovidessufficientmechanicalstrengthatelevatedtemperatures. Nbhas
alsoanextremelysmallincoherentneutron scattering crosssection. Hence,anaccept-
able signal-to-background ratio of about 10:1 can be achieved within the elastic and
quasielasticregionevenwithsuchamassive pressure cellwitha35mmouterdiame-
terand12mmwallthickness. Aninternalheatingsetupisusedtoheatupthesamples.
Thisisfavorableforhighpressureapparatusoperatedathightemperatures. Withsuch
setup the sample environment provides a temperature range from ambient tempera-
ture up to 1500 K at pressures up to 2 kbar at the sample position. Samples with a
3volumeofaround1cm canbemeasured,whichmeetstheintensityrequirementsfor
theneutrontime-of-flightexperiments.
vThe realization of the high temperature high pressure sample environment opens
anewpossibilityofusingquasielasticneutronscatteringtechniquestostudyhydrous
silicates. This enables direct observations of water dynamics in silicate melts under
magmachamberconditionsonanabsolutescale. Neutronscatteringalsoprovidesthe
possibilitytoperformacontrastvariationviaH O/D Osubstitution. Asaresultpure2 2
protonsignalscanbeextracted.
In the hydrous NaAlSi O and SiO system, The proton dynamics is not so fast3 8 2
asexpected,althoughthemacroscopicglasstransitiontemperatureofthesampleshas
already dropped almost by a factor of 2 compared to that of the dry silicates. No
resolvablequasielasticbroadeningordecayoftheintermediatescatteringfunctionhas
been observed with the instrumental energy resolutions available on TOFTOF at the
highestmeasuredtemperature. Thelowerboundaryvalueofthediffusioncoefficients
−10 2 −1isontheorderof10 m s intheinvestigatedtemperaturerange.
Anunusual relaxation behaviour of the proton in hydrous sodium trisilicate melt
has been observed. In the energy domain analysis, the scattering function S(q,ω) of
the pure proton signal shows a clear elastic contribution which cannot be described
by a simple Lorentzian or Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW, Fourier transformed
stretchedexponential)function. Theanalysisofthehighfrequencywingofthespectra
indicatesananomalousdiffusivebehaviour.
In the time domain analysis, the intermediate scattering function S(q,t) exhibits
an extreme stretching. Instead of using an unphysical stretching exponent value, the
signal is best fitted with a logarithmic like decay to an intermediate non-zero con-
2stant value f (q) at large time around 20∼25 ps. The further decay of this constant
valuetowardszeroisoutoftheaccessibletimewindowatTOFTOF.Throughacareful
2analysisoftheq andtemperature dependenceoff (q),anattribution ofthe fast/slow
relaxations to different proton environments cannot be satisfied. Within the neutron
experiment results no evidence of different dynamics inducedby different proton en-
vironmentsduetodifferentwaterspecieshasbeenidentified.
Logarithmic like decay is a signature of the dynamics in systems which have dif-
ferent competitive arrest mechanisms as expected by mode coupling theory. This has
been confirmed to be present in binary hard spheres mixtures with a sufficient large
size disparity like sodium trisilicate melt under certain conditions. The observations
onhydroussodiumsilicatemeltshaveshownqualitativelyagreementswithsuchthe-
oreticalpredictions. Theprotondynamicscanbeunderstoodunderaglass-glasstran-
sition scenario, where the proton is still able to diffuse in the immobile, glassy Si-O
matrix before the complete system is frozen. To verify such interpretation it is neces-
2sary to further study the final decay of the intermediate plateau value f (q) to zero,
whichisexpectedbythemodecouplingtheorytobeastretchedexponentialdecay.
viZusammenfassung
Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war die Entwicklung einer Hochtemperatur Druckzelle,
fu¨r den Einsatz bei der Neutronen Flugzeitspektrometrie, um die Wasserdynamik in
wasserhaltigen Silikatschmelzen unter hohen Temperaturen und Dru¨cken mit quasi-
elastischer Neutronenstreuung zu untersuchen. Das Versta¨ndniss des Relaxationsver-
haltens von Silikatschmelzen spielt bei vielen geologischen Prozessen eine wichtige
Rolle, zum Beispiel bei aktiven Vulkanismus. Das Hinzufu¨hren von Wasser zu Sili-
kat verursacht eine dramatische nicht-lineare Verringerung der Viskosita¨t um etwa 5-
10 Gro¨ßenordnungen. Durch Lo¨sung des Wassers in der Silikatschmelze entsteht OH
Gruppen und H O. Die Untersuchung der Wasserdynamik spielt eine Schlu¨sselrolle2
umdieEigenschaftenderSchmelzezuverstehen.DerLo¨sungs-undTransportmecha-
nismusdesWassersinderSilikatschmelzeistnochunverstanden.MitNeutronenstreu-
experimentenistesmo¨glichmikroskopischeDynamikaufZeitskalenvonPico-bisNa-
nosekunden, sowie auf interatomaren Absta¨nden zu untersuchen. Dank der intrinsi-
schenqAuflo¨sungko¨nnenDiffusionsmechanismendurchAnalysederqAbha¨ngigkeit
derStreuamplitudeundLinienformuntersuchtwerden.
Wasserhaltige Silikatproben wurden durch Verschmelzen der trockenen Silikate
mitWasser,beihohenTemperaturenundDru¨ckenmiteinemtotalenWassergehaltvon
10%mol,hergestellt. DurchEinordnenderentsprechendenGlassu¨ergangstemperatur
mittels Kalor- undDilatometrischen Methoden konnte eine homogene Verteilung des
WassersinderSilikatschmelzenachgewiesenwerden.
Um wasserhaltige Silikatschelzen bei Temperaturen weit u¨ber deren Glasu¨ber-
gangstemperaturzuuntersuchen,werdenDru¨ckeum1-2kbarbeno¨tigt,umdieWasser-
verdunstung zu unterdru¨cken. Um dies zu gewa¨hrleisten wurde eine Hochtempe-
ratur Druckzelle konstruiert, die fu¨r das Flugzeitspektrometer TOFTOF am FRM II
ausgelegt war. Nb ist ein Hochtemperaturwerkstoff der im relevanten Temperaturbe-
reich stabil ist. Der inkoha¨rente Netronenstreuquerschnitt ist ausergewo¨hnlich klein.
Im elastischen und quasielastischen Bereich kann damit ein Signal zu Untergrund-
verha¨ltniss von 10:1 erzielt werden, trotz der mit einem Durchmesser von 35mm und
12mm starken Wa¨nden versehenen massiven Druckzelle. Die Proben werden durch
eine Innenbeheizung auf Temperatur gebracht, die optimal fu¨r einen Hochtempera-
tur und Druckapparat ist. Mit dieser Hochtemperatur Druckzelle sind Temperaturen
bis zu 1500 K und Dru¨cke bis zu 2kbar an der Probenposition mo¨glich. In der Flug-
zeitspektrometrie ko¨nnenausIntensita¨tsgru¨ndenProbenbiszueinemVolumenvon1
3cm untersuchtwerden.
Die Umsetzung der Hochtemperatur Druckzelle ero¨ffnet neue Mo¨glichkeiten um
wasserhaltige Silikatschmelzen durch quasielastische Neutronenstreuung zu unter-
viisuchen.DiemikroskopischeWasserdynamikkannunterBedingungenuntersuchtwer-
denwiesieinMagmakammernvorherrschen.DurchKontrastvariationmitD2O/H2O
kanndasProtonsignalerschlossenwerden.InwasserhaltigenAlbit-undSiO -systemen2
ist die Protondynamik langsamer alserwartet, obwohl diemakroskopische Glasu¨ber-
gangstemperatur derProben,durchWasserzugabeumeinenFaktor 2verringert wur-
de. Keine auflo¨sbare quasielastische Verbreiterung oder ein Zerfall der intermedia¨ren
Streufunktion wurde bei der ho¨chsten gemessenen Temperatur mit der Energieauf-
lo¨sung des TOFTOF beobachtet. Die untere Grenze des Diffusionskoeffizienten liegt
−10 2 −1imuntersuchtenTemperatubereichinderGro¨ßenordnungvon10 m s .
EinnichttrivialesRelaxationsverhaltendesProtonsinderwasserhaltigenNatrium-
trisilikatschmelze wurde beobachtet. Im Energieraum zeigt die Streufunktion S(q,ω)
desProtonsignalseinenreinelastischenBeitrag,dernichtmiteinereinfachenLorentz-
oderKohlrausch-Williams-Watt-Funktionbeschriebenwerdenkann.
Im Zeitraum zeigt die intermedia¨re Streufunktion S(q,t) einen langsameren Ab-
fall. Am besten la¨sst sich das Signal mit einem logarithmischen Zerfall vergleichen,
2der bei langen Zeiten um die 20-25 ps auf einen konstanten Wert f (q) abfa¨llt. Der
weitereVerlaufdiesesPlateausliegtaußerhalbdesexprimentellzuga¨nglichenZeitska-
len. Durch Analyse derq- und Temperaturabha¨ngigkeit kann keine Aussage u¨ber die
langsame oder schnelle Dynamik in unterschiedlichen Wasserspecies getroffen wer-
den. Durch die Neutronenstreuexperimente konnte kein Beweis fu¨r unterschiedliche
DynamikaufgrundunterschiedlicherProtonumgebungenerbrachtwerden.
Ein logarithmischer Zerfall ist ein Anzeichen fu¨r mikroskopische Dynamik die
durchgegensa¨tzliche”Cageing”-Mechansimenbestimmtist,wiemanimRahmender
Modenkopplungstheorie erwarten wu¨rde. Dies wurde unteranderemfu¨r bina¨re harte
Kugel Systeme mit stark abweichenden Durchmessern besta¨tigt, wie die Natriumtri-
silikatschmelze unter gewissen Bedingungen.Die Beobachtungen an derwasserhalti-
genNatriumsilikatschmelzestimmenqualitativmitdiesentheoretischenVorhersagen
¨u¨berein. Die Protondynamik kann als ein Glas-Glas-Ubergangs Szenario verstanden
werden, indem das Proton noch durch die eingefrorrene Si-O Matrix diffundiert, be-
vorauchdiesesseineBeweglichkeitverliert.UmdieseInterpretationnachzuweisenist
2esnotwendig denAbfalldesPlateausf (q)auf0zuuntersuchen,derimRahmender
Modenkopplungstheorie einergestrecktenExponentialfunktionfolgensollte.
viii