Mathematics Grades 6-8 Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits
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Mathematics Grades 6-8 Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits

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Mathematics Grade 7 Quarter 3 Tested Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits Benchmark Benchmark Content Limits Clarification MA.A.1.3.2 The student understands the relative size of integers, Students will identify, order, Items may compare and order fractions, decimals, numbers expressed as fractions, and decimals; numbers expressed as percents; numbers and/or compare the relative percents, integers, and numbers with exponents, and numbers expressed in with exponents; numbers in scientific notation; radicals; absolute size of numbers. standard scientific notation, including ordering on a number line. value; and ratios. Items may compare smaller or larger numbers, or compare the order of magnitude between numbers. An item may utilize one format or a variety of formats, such as fractions, decimals, percents, and standard scientific notation. MA.A.2.3.1 The student understands and uses exponential and Students will represent or Items may provide expressions of whole numbers in exponential and/or scientific notation. solve problems using standard scientific notation. numbers in exponential Items other than those using standard scientific notation will use and/or standard scientific exponents no greater than 5. notation. Items involving standard scientific notation should be limited to whole numbers less than one billion. MA.A.4.3.1 The student uses estimation strategies to predict results Students will determine The data presented to students ...

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Language English
Mathematics
Grade 7 Quarter 3
Tested Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits
Benchmark
Benchmark
Clarification
Content Limits
MA.A.1.3.2
The student understands the relative size of integers,
fractions, and decimals; numbers expressed as percents; numbers
with exponents; numbers in scientific notation; radicals; absolute
value; and ratios.
Students will identify, order,
and/or compare the relative
size of numbers.
Items may compare and order fractions, decimals, numbers expressed as
percents, integers, and numbers with exponents, and numbers expressed in
standard scientific notation, including ordering on a number line.
Items may compare smaller or larger numbers, or compare the order of
magnitude between numbers.
An item may utilize one format or a variety of formats, such as fractions,
decimals, percents, and standard scientific notation.
MA.A.2.3.1
The student understands and uses exponential and
scientific notation.
Students will represent or
solve problems using
numbers in exponential
and/or standard scientific
notation.
Items may provide expressions of whole numbers in exponential and/or
standard scientific notation.
Items other than those using standard scientific notation will use
exponents no greater than 5.
Items involving standard scientific notation should be limited to whole
numbers less than one billion.
MA.A.4.3.1
The student uses estimation strategies to predict results
and to check the reasonableness of results.
Also assesses
MA.A.4.2.1
The student uses and justifies different
estimation strategies in a real-world problem situation and
determines the reasonableness of results of calculations in a given
problem situation.
Also assesses
MA.B.2.3.1
The student uses direct (measured) and
indirect (not measured) measures to compare a given characteristic
in either metric or customary units.
Also assesses
MA.B.3.3.1
The student solves real-world and
mathematical problems involving estimates of measurements
including length, time, weight/mass, temperature, money, perimeter,
area, and volume, in either customary or metric units.
Students will determine
estimates and/or their
appropriateness.
The data presented to students may be either precise values, a range of
values, or a combination of precise values and estimates of other values.
Items should be limited to use of whole numbers only.
MA.B.1.3.1
The student uses concrete and graphic models to derive
formulas for finding perimeter, area, surface area, circumference,
and volume of two- and three-dimensional shapes, including
rectangular solids and cylinders.
Also assesses
MA.B.1.2.2
The student solves real-world problems
involving length, weight, perimeter, area, capacity, volume, time,
temperature, and angles.
Also assesses
MA.B.2.3.1
The student uses direct (measured) and
indirect (not measured) measures to compare a given characteristic
in either metric or customary units.
Students will solve a problem
involving perimeter, area,
surface area, circumference,
or volume.
Items may assess finding linear measure, weight, capacity, time,
temperature, perimeter, area, circumference, and the surface area or
volume of prisms and cylinders.
The number of two- or three-dimensional figures assessed in an item
cannot exceed two.
Items involving
π
should be multiple-choice.
MA.B.1.3.2
The student uses concrete and graphic models to derive
formulas for finding rates, distance, time, and angle measures.
At Grade 6
, this benchmark will be assessed with
MA.C.1.3.1
.
Students will solve a problem
involving rate, distance, or
time.
General Content Limits apply.
SLC Scope & Sequence Companion
May 2006
1
Mathematics
Grade 7 Quarter 3
Tested Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits
Benchmark
Benchmark
Clarification
Content Limits
Also assesses
MA.B.1.2.2
The student solves real-world problems
involving length, weight, perimeter, area, capacity, volume, time,
temperature, and angles.
Also assesses
MA.B.2.3.1
The student uses direct (measured) and
indirect (not measured) measures to compare a given characteristic
in either metric or customary units.
MA.B.1.3.3
The student understands and describes how the change
of a figure in such dimensions as length, width, height, or radius
affects its other measurements such as perimeter, area, surface area,
and volume.
Also assesses
MA.C.2.3.1
The student understands the geometric
concepts of symmetry, reflections, congruency, similarity,
perpendicularity, parallelism, and transformations, including flips
(reflections), slides (translations), turns (rotations), and
enlargements.
Students will determine the
effects of changing
dimensions on other
measures or solve problems
involving the effects of
changing dimensions.
Items may assess how a change in a figure’s dimensions affects its
perimeter (including circumference), area, surface area, or volume, or how
changes in the volume, surface area, area, or perimeter of a figure affect
the dimensions of the figure.
The changes in dimensions of a figure that are increases should use scale
factors that are whole numbers.
The changes in dimensions of a figure that are decreases should use scale
factors that are common-unit fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 5, or
10.
Changes in figures involving volume should be based primarily on
rectangular prisms.
MA.B.1.3.4
The student constructs, interprets, and uses scale
drawings such as those based on number lines and maps to solve
real-world problems.
Also assesses
MA.B.2.3.1
The student uses direct (measured) and
indirect (not measured) measures to compare a given characteristic
in either metric or customary units.
Students will interpret and
solve a problem using scale
drawings.
Items may require students to demonstrate knowledge of proportional
relationships in scale drawings or solve real-world problems, including
distance, using a scale drawing.
Measurements may be in either metric or customary units. Items should
involve interpreting and applying various scales, including those based on
number lines, graphs, models, and maps.
Scales, increments, and measures should be restricted to number lines and
common ruler measures up to eighths.
MA.B.2.3.2
The student solves problems involving units of
measure and converts answers to a larger or smaller unit within
either the metric or customary system.
Students will solve a problem
involving conversions to
other units.
All conversions of units must be within the same system of measurement
(metric or customary).
Items should involve only one-unit conversions (e.g., converting seconds
to hours) and not mixed units (e.g., converting hours and minutes to
seconds).
MA.C.1.3.1
The student understands the basic properties of, and
relationships pertaining to, regular and irregular geometric shapes in
two and three dimensions.
Also assesses
MA.C.1.2.1
The student, given a verbal description,
draws and/or models two- and three-dimensional shapes and uses
appropriate geometric vocabulary to write a description of a figure
or a picture composed of geometric figures.
Students will identify and/or
analyze two- and three-
dimensional shapes using
their basic properties and
relationships.
Items will assess identifying basic properties of lines, congruent figures,
various types of angles, and angle relationships (including
complementary, supplementary, and vertical angles).
Items will assess attributes of regular and irregular polygons, such as
parallelograms, trapezoids, pentagons, hexagons, triangles, and
quadrilaterals.
Items should utilize only a single figure, with no comparisons to other
figures or transformations.
Items assessing three-dimensional figures will use rectangular prisms,
right circular cylinders, square pyramids, cones, spheres, or hemispheres.
SLC Scope & Sequence Companion
May 2006
2
Mathematics
Grade 7 Quarter 3
Tested Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits
Benchmark
Benchmark
Clarification
Content Limits
MA.C.2.3.1
The student understands the geometric concepts of
symmetry, reflections, congruency, similarity, perpendicularity,
parallelism, and transformations, including flips (reflections), slides
(translations), turns (rotations), and enlargements.
Also assesses
MA.B.1.3.3
The student understands and describes
how the change of a figure in such dimensions as length, width,
height, or radius affects its other measurements such as perimeter,
area, surface area, and volume.
Also assesses
MA.C.1.2.1
The student, given a verbal description,
draws and/or models two- and three-dimensional shapes and uses
appropriate geometric vocabulary to write a description of a figure
or a picture composed of geometric figures.
Also assesses
MA.C.1.3.
1 The student understands the basic
properties of, and relationships pertaining to, regular and irregular
geometric shapes in two and three dimensions.
Also assesses
MA.C.3.3.1
The student represents and applies
geometric properties and relationships to solve real-world and
mathematical problems.
Students will identify and
apply various geometric
concepts, including
parallelism, perpendicularity,
symmetry, congruency,
similarity, and
transformations, including
reflections, translations,
rotations, or dilations.
Items should assess only geometric concepts of two-dimensional figures.
MA.C.3.3.1
The student represents and applies geometric properties
and relationships to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
Also assesses
MA.C.2.3.1
The student understands the geometric
concepts of symmetry, reflections, congruency, similarity,
perpendicularity, parallelism, and transformations, including flips
(reflections), slides (translations), turns (rotations), and
enlargements.
Also assesses
MA.C.2.3.2
The student predicts and verifies patterns
involving tessellations (a covering of a plane with congruent copies
of the same pattern with no holes and no overlaps, like floor tiles).
Also assesses
MA.C.3.2.2
The student identifies and plots positive
ordered pairs (whole numbers) in a rectangular coordinate system
(graph).
Note: Coordinate geometry items may involve the use of algebraic
properties to solve geometric problems.
Students will apply geometric
properties and relationships
to solve problems.
Items should assess the geometric properties and concepts described in
C.1.3.1
and
C.2.3.1
. (These are properties of and relationships pertaining
to regular and irregular figures, and the concepts of symmetry, reflections,
congruency, similarity, perpendicularity, parallelism, and
transformations.)
Items will not assess three-dimensional figures.
MA.E.1.3.1
The student collects, organizes, and displays data in a
variety of forms, including tables, line graphs, charts, bar graphs, to
determine how different ways of presenting data can lead to
different interpretations.
Also assesses
MA.E.1.3.3
The student analyzes real-world data by
applying appropriate formulas for measures of central tendency and
organizing data in a quality display, using appropriate technology,
including calculators and computers.
Students will read and
interpret data displayed in a
variety of forms and
determine appropriate titles,
scales, labels, keys, and
intervals.
Items may include pictographs, charts, stem-and-leaf plots, box-and-
whisker plots, scatter plots, data tables, circle graphs, single-and multiple-
bar graphs, single- and multiple-line graphs, and Venn diagrams.
SLC Scope & Sequence Companion
May 2006
3
Mathematics
Grade 7 Quarter 3
Tested Benchmark Clarification and Content Limits
Benchmark
Benchmark
Clarification
Content Limits
MA.E.1.3.2
The student understands and applies the concepts of
range and central tendency (mean, median, and mode).
Also assesses
MA.E.1.3.3
The student analyzes real-world data by
applying appropriate formulas for measures of central tendency and
organizing data in a quality display, using appropriate technology,
including calculators and computers.
Students will apply the
concepts of range, mean,
median, and/or mode to solve
a problem.
Items will assess finding the range, mean, median, or mode of a set of data
presented in a chart, list, table, graph, or plot (e.g., stem-and-leaf plot, line
plot, or box-and-whisker plot).
No more than 12 pieces of data should be used for calculations of the
mean.
No more than three categories of information should be used in data sets.
MA.E.2.3.1
The student compares experimental results with
mathematical expectations of probabilities.
Students will identify
possible outcomes and/or
compare the results of
experiments.
Items may include probabilities for independent and dependent events.
Mathematical expectations of probabilities will be assessed using simple
empirical data or theoretical probabilities.
MA.E.2.3.2
The student determines odds for and odds against a
given situation.
Also assesses
MA.E.2.2.2
The student predicts the likelihood of
simple events occurring.
Students will determine the
odds for or odds against a
specified outcome or the
probability of a simple event
occurring.
Items developed for this benchmark should assess simple events.
Probabilities should be expressed as fractions.
MA.E.3.3.1
The student formulates hypotheses, designs
experiments, collects and interprets data, and evaluates hypotheses
by making inferences and drawing conclusions based on statistics
(range, mean, median, and mode) and tables, graphs, and charts.
Also assesses
MA.E.3.3.2
The student identifies the common uses
and misuses of probability and statistical analysis in the everyday
world.
Students will formulate and
evaluate hypotheses, use
statistical results, and/or
identify common uses and
misuses of statistical
information.
Common misuses of probability and statistics should be limited to:
• inadequate or non-representative sample size;
• incomplete or incorrect graphs;
•over-generalized results;
•over-interpretation of numerical data;
• use of raw data, percents, or statistics (range, median, mean, mode) to
misrepresent the data collected; and
• misinterpretation of the likelihood and significance of the results.
SLC Scope & Sequence Companion
May 2006
4