Health Care Utilization by Canadian Women

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Health Issues While women are reported to be more frequent users of health services in Canada, differences in women's and men's health care utilization have not been fully explored. To provide an overview on women's healthcare utilization, we selected two key issues that are important for public policy purposes: access to care and patterns of utilization. These issues are examined using primarily data from the 1998/99 National Population Health Survey, complemented by the 2000 Canadian Community Health Survey and the 2001 Health Service Access Survey. Key Findings • Women are twice as likely as men to report a regular family physician, but that proportion is very low (15.8%). • Women report significantly shorter specialist wait times (20.9 days) than men (55.4 days) for mental health, while the reverse is true for asthma and other breathing conditions (10.8 for men, 78.8 for women). • Reported mean wait times are significantly lower for men than for women pertaining to overall diagnostic tests: for MRI, 70.3 days for women compared to 29.1 days for men. Data Gaps and Recommendations • Measurement of possible system bias and its implication for equitable and quality healthcare for women requires larger provincial samples of the national surveys, along with a longitudinal design. • Either a national database on preventive services, or better alignment of provincial databases pertaining to health promotion and preventive services, is needed to facilitate data linkage with national surveys to undertake longitudinal studies that support gender based analyses.

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Published 01 January 2004
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BMC Women's Health
Report Health Care Utilization by Canadian Women 1 23 Arminée Kazanjian*, Denise Morettinand Robert Cho
BioMedCentral
Open Access
1 Address: HealthCare & Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, The University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, James Mather Building, 2 3 Vancouver, Canada,Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, 4292194 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, Canada andCentre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada, 120 Colonnade Rd, Ottawa, Canada Email: Arminée Kazanjian*  a.kazanjian@ubc.ca; Denise Morettin  morettin@chspr.ubc.ca; Robert Cho rcdcho@ahsmail.uwaterloo.ca * Corresponding author
fromWomen's Health Surveillance Report
Published: 25 August 2004 BMC Women's Health2004,4(Suppl 1):S33doi:10.1186/1472-6874-4-S1-S33 This article is available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/4/S1/S33This article is available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/ 4/S1/S33This article is available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/4/S1/S33This article is available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/ 1472-6874/4/S1/S33This article is available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6874/4/S1/S33 <supplement><title><p>Women'sHealthSurveillanceReport</p></title><editor>MarieDesMeules,DonnaStewart,ArminéeKazanijan,HeatherMcLean,JennfierPayne,BilkisVissandjée</editor><sponsor><note>TheWomen'sHealthSurvelilanceReportwasfundedbyHealthCanada,theCanadianInstituteforHealthInformation(CanadianPopulationHealthInitiative)andtheCanadianInstitutesofHealthResearch</note></sponsor><note>Reports</note><url>http/:/www.biomedcentral.com/content/pd/f1472-6874-4-S1-info.pdf</url></supplement>
Abstract Health Issues:While women are reported to be more frequent users of health services in Canada, differences in women's and men's health care utilization have not been fully explored. To provide an overview on women's healthcare utilization, we selected two key issues that are important for public policy purposes: access to care and patterns of utilization. These issues are examined using primarily data from the 1998/99 National Population Health Survey, complemented by the 2000 Canadian Community Health Survey and the 2001 Health Service Access Survey. Key Findings:• Women are twice as likely as men to report a regular family physician, but that proportion is very low (15.8%). • Women report significantly shorter specialist wait times (20.9 days) than men (55.4 days) for mental health, while the reverse is true for asthma and other breathing conditions (10.8 for men, 78.8 for women). • Reported mean wait times are significantly lower for men than for women pertaining to overall diagnostic tests: for MRI, 70.3 days for women compared to 29.1 days for men. Data Gaps and Recommendations:• Measurement of possible system bias and its implication for equitable and quality healthcare for women requires larger provincial samples of the national surveys, along with a longitudinal design. • Either a national database on preventive services, or better alignment of provincial databases pertaining to health promotion and preventive services, is needed to facilitate data linkage with national surveys to undertake longitudinal studies that support gender based analyses.
Background Although it is known that women are more frequent users of health services than men in Canada,[1] the reasons for the difference in women and men's health care utilization have not been fully explored. For example, are women seen as frequent users of primary care because of the
health care system structure and data that capture feefor service transactions but not necessarily episodes of pri mary and/or acute care that reflect women's experiences of illness? Complex research questions on the interactions between sex, disease, health care utilization and social roles remain largely unanswered.
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