201 Pages
English

High-power CW green lasers for optical metrology and their joint benefit in particle physics experiments [Elektronische Ressource] / Tobias Meier

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Description

High-Power CW Green Lasers forOptical Metrology and Their Joint Benefitin Particle Physics ExperimentsVon der Fakultät für Mathematik und Physikder Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannoverzur Erlangung des GradesDoktor der Naturwissenschaften– Dr.rer.nat. –genehmigte DissertationvonDipl.-Phys. Tobias Meiergeboren am 08. Februar 1980 in Bad Pyrmont2011Referent: Prof. Dr. Piet O. SchmidtKorreferent: Priv. Doz. Dr. habil. Benno WillkeTag der Promotion: 26. Mai 2011AbstractIn comparison with infrared lasers, high-power continuous-wave (CW) single-frequency laser sources emitting visible green light are beneficial in various engi-neering applications and physics experiments. However, in the past their outputpowers were limited to about 20W.Light shining through a wall (LSW) experiments utilized pulsed green lasersin the past. Their sensitivity was limited by the available average output powersof those systems with suitable beam quality and pulse length. These remainedbelow 10W.In this thesis a CW single-frequency 532nm laser source with an unprecedentedoutput power of 134W was realized, via the effect of second harmonic generation.The power level was long-term stable and generated with 90% external conversionefficiency, the best for high-power devices so far. It was found, that at most3% of the harmonic power was contained in higher-order transversal modes. Anew technique was developed here, too, which reduced the uncertainty in thismeasurement.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2011
Reads 36
Language English
Document size 4 MB

High-Power CW Green Lasers for
Optical Metrology and Their Joint Benefit
in Particle Physics Experiments
Von der Fakultät für Mathematik und Physik
der Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover
zur Erlangung des Grades
Doktor der Naturwissenschaften
– Dr.rer.nat. –
genehmigte Dissertation
von
Dipl.-Phys. Tobias Meier
geboren am 08. Februar 1980 in Bad Pyrmont
2011Referent: Prof. Dr. Piet O. Schmidt
Korreferent: Priv. Doz. Dr. habil. Benno Willke
Tag der Promotion: 26. Mai 2011Abstract
In comparison with infrared lasers, high-power continuous-wave (CW) single-
frequency laser sources emitting visible green light are beneficial in various engi-
neering applications and physics experiments. However, in the past their output
powers were limited to about 20W.
Light shining through a wall (LSW) experiments utilized pulsed green lasers
in the past. Their sensitivity was limited by the available average output powers
of those systems with suitable beam quality and pulse length. These remained
below 10W.
In this thesis a CW single-frequency 532nm laser source with an unprecedented
output power of 134W was realized, via the effect of second harmonic generation.
The power level was long-term stable and generated with 90% external conversion
efficiency, the best for high-power devices so far. It was found, that at most
3% of the harmonic power was contained in higher-order transversal modes. A
new technique was developed here, too, which reduced the uncertainty in this
measurement.
In addition to the work just described, the improvement of a large-scale LSW
experiment to the best sensitivity world-wide was also conducted in this thesis.
The crucial, innovative step was the substitution of the pulsed laser by a combi-
nation of a CW single-frequency high-power green laser and a 9m long production
resonator. Anopticalpowerof 1kWwasstoredonaverageintheopticalresonator
for a data taking duration of 55h.
Finally, design considerations were made here for an enormously improved fu-
ture LSW experiment, which incorporates a regeneration cavity. A specific basic
implementation was designed and its sensitivity was estimated.
Keywords: second harmonic generation, optical metrology,
light shining through a wall
iiiKurzzusammenfassung
VerglichenmitInfrarotlasern,besitzeneinfrequenteHochleistungsdauerstrichlaser
im sichtbaren grünen Spektralbereich Vorteile in einer Reihe von Ingenieursan-
wendungen und physikalischen Experimenten. Ihre Leistungspegel waren in der
Vergangenheit jedoch auf ca. 20W begrenzt.
Licht durch die Wand (im Englischen abgekürzt durch LSW) Experimente ver-
wendeten in der Vergangenheit gepulste grüne Laser. Daher war ihre Sensitivität
begrenzt durch die Ausgangsleistungen der verfügbaren Systeme mit geeigneter
Strahlqualität und Pulslänge. Diese waren geringer als 10W.
In dieser Arbeit wurde mittels Frequenzverdopplung eine Quelle einfrequenter
Dauerstrichlaserstrahlung mit einer Wellenlänge von 532nm und einer beispiello-
sen Ausgangsleistung von 134W realisiert. Der Leistungspegel war langzeitstabil
und wurde mit einer externen Konversionseffizienz von 90 % generiert, die bis-
her beste für Hochleistungssysteme. Der Leistungsanteil in höheren transversalen
Moden wurde zu höchstens 3% bestimmt. Hier wurde auch eine neue Messme-
thode entwickelt, die eine Verringerung der Unsicherheit in solchen Messungen
ermöglicht.
Darüber hinaus wurde in dieser Arbeit ein LSW Experiment zum Sensitivsten
weltweit ausgebaut. Der hierfür entscheidende, innovative Schritt war die Erset-
zung des gepulsten Lasersystems durch die Kombination eines einfrequenten grü-
nen Hochleistungsdauerstrichlasers mit einem 9m langen Produktionsresonator.
Im Mittel wurde eine optische Leistung von 1kW über eine Messdauer von 55h
in diesem Resonator gespeichert.
Abschließend wurden Designstudien für ein zukünftiges, immens verbessertes
LSW Experiment durchgeführt, welches einen Regenerationsresonator beinhalte-
te. Es wurde eine spezifische grundlegende Implementierung entwickelt, und ihre
Sensitivität wurde abgeschätzt.
Stichworte: Frequenzverdopplung, optische Messtechnik, Licht durch die Wand
vContents
1. Introduction 1
2. High-power 532 nm single-frequency TEM laser sources 500
2.1. Light propagation through media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.1.1. Propagation in a linear medium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.1.2. Gaussian beams and plane waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.1.3. Optical resonators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.1.4. Propagation in a nonlinear medium . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.1.5. Nonlinear susceptibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.1.6. (Quasi-)Phase matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.1.7. The coupled equations of motion for SHG . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.2. Modelling high-power second harmonic generation . . . . . . . . . 19
2.2.1. The Boyd-Kleinman integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.2.2. Approximate analytic solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.2.3. Doubling schemes and suitable crystals . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.2.4. Processes that lead to thermal dephasing . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2.5. Models with and without thermal . . . . . . . . 25
2.3. Converting an intermediate power metrology laser . . . . . . . . . 31
2.3.1. Reported harmonic power levels of green light from PPKTP 31
2.3.2. General external-cavity design considerations . . . . . . . . 32
2.3.3. Design of the resonant PPKTP SHG stage . . . . . . . . . 33
2.3.4. Experimental setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.3.5. Results and discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.4. A 130 W CW single-frequency TEM green laser source . . . . . . 5400
2.4.1. Highest reported harmonic power levels for green light . . . 55
2.4.2. Choice of design and crystal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
vii2.4.3. Design of the SHG experiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
2.4.4. Experimental setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
2.4.5. Conventional analysis of transverse mode structure . . . . . 63
2.4.6. Reduction of transverse mode analysis uncertainty . . . . . 65
2.4.7. Results and discussion of the SHG experiment . . . . . . . 67
2.5. Summary and outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
3. ALPS I project - Particle physics with high-power green light 85
3.1. Particle physics with laser light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
3.1.1. The standard model of particle physics . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
3.1.2. Virtual particles and Feynman diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . 89
3.1.3. One-loop process magnetic vacuum birefringence . . . . . . 89
3.1.4. Particle accelerators and LSW experiments . . . . . . . . . 91
3.1.5. Problems of the Standard Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
3.2. Hypothetical hidden sector particles coupling to photons . . . . . . 96
3.2.1. Three kinds of hypothetical particles . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
3.2.2. WISPs as answers to puzzling astrophysical observations . . 98
3.3. State of the art of LSW experiments in the world . . . . . . . . . . 100
3.4. The first LSW experiment with production resonator . . . . . . . . 101
3.4.1. Design and experimental setup of ALPS I (phase 1) . . . . 103
3.4.2. Results of ALPS I (phase 1) and discussion . . . . . . . . . 114
3.5. ALPS I (phase 2) - the world’s most sensitive WISP detector . . . 125
3.5.1. Experimental setup of ALPS I (phase 2) experiment . . . . 125
3.5.2. Results of ALPS I (phase 2) and discussion . . . . . . . . . 129
3.6. Summary and outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
4. ALPS II - High-precision optical metrology boosts sensitivity 143
4.1. Signal enhancement on the regeneration side . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
4.1.1. Local oscillator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
4.1.2. Regeneration cavity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
4.1.3. Possible experimental realizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
4.2. Basic design study for the ALPS II experiment . . . . . . . . . . . 147
4.2.1. Cavity design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
4.2.2. Power buildup factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
4.2.3. Cavity length and free apertures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
4.2.4. Highest intensity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
4.2.5. Spatial overlap of cavity modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
4.2.6. Mirror lifetime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
4.3. A proposed experimental setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
4.3.1. Proposed experimental setup for ALPS II . . . . . . . . . . 154
4.3.2. Technical challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
4.4. Projected sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
viii4.5. Summary and outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
5. Conclusion 163
A. Basic optics 167
A.1. Maxwell’s equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
A.2. General solution describing light propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
A.3. Intensity and power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Bibliography 171
About the Author 185
Acknowledgements 187
ix