Man and his migrations
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Man and his migrations

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ru AND HIS MIGRATIONS.MAN G.R. M.D., F.R.S.,LATHAM, MEMBER TO THE ETHNOLOGICAL NEWCORRESPONDING SOCIETY, YORK, ETC. ETC. LONDON: JOHN VAN PATERNOSTER ROW.VOORST, MDCCCLI. *' PRINTED BY RICHARD TAYLOR, RED LION FLEET STREET.COURT, PREFACE. a Course of SixTHE following pages represent Lectures delivered at the Mechanics' Institution, in the month of March of the presentLiverpool, before thethe matter now laid ; being publicyear forma fuller and morein somewhat systematic thethan was with delivery.compatible original CONTENTS CHAPTER I. Page The Natural or Man the CivilofPhysical History their difference divisions of the Natural or Phy- sical how farHistory EthnologyAnthropology the ancients Herodotus how farpursued by by the moderns Buffon DaubentonLinn^us Blumenbach the term CaucasianCamper Cuvier as an instrument ofPhilology ethnological Hervas Leibnitz Re-investigation Pigafetta land the union ofAdelung Klaproth Philology and of Prichard itsAnatomy Palaeontological character influence of ofWhe-Lyell's Geology well's of the Inductive Sciences 1-36History CHAPTER II.

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ruAND HIS MIGRATIONS.MAN
G.R. M.D., F.R.S.,LATHAM,
MEMBER TO THE ETHNOLOGICAL NEWCORRESPONDING SOCIETY, YORK,
ETC. ETC.
LONDON:
JOHN VAN PATERNOSTER ROW.VOORST,
MDCCCLI.*'
PRINTED BY RICHARD TAYLOR,
RED LION FLEET STREET.COURT,PREFACE.
a Course of SixTHE following pages represent
Lectures delivered at the Mechanics' Institution,
in the month of March of the presentLiverpool,
before thethe matter now laid
; being publicyear
forma fuller and morein somewhat systematic
thethan was with delivery.compatible originalCONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
Page
The Natural or Man the CivilofPhysical History
their difference divisions of the Natural or Phy-
sical how farHistory EthnologyAnthropology
the ancients Herodotus how farpursued by by
the moderns Buffon DaubentonLinn^us
Blumenbach the term CaucasianCamper
Cuvier as an instrument ofPhilology ethnological
Hervas Leibnitz Re-investigation Pigafetta
land the union ofAdelung Klaproth Philology
and of Prichard itsAnatomy Palaeontological
character influence of ofWhe-Lyell's Geology
well's of the Inductive Sciences 1-36History
CHAPTER II.
its the chief connectedEthnology objects problems
with it transfer ofprospective questions popula-
tions extract from Knox correlation of certain
of the to certain external influencesparts body
less to such influencesparts subject retrospective
the or ourofquestions unity non-unity species
of ofopinions plurality species multiplicity pro-
doctrine of Dokkos ex-toplasts development
tract of our itsantiquity species geographical
term racethe 37-66origin
CHAPTER III.
Methods the science one of andobservation deduc-
tion rather than classification onexperiment
on the first formineralogical, zoological principles
the second for value ofAnthropology, Ethnology
as a test instances of its loss of itsLanguage
retention when it whenrelation,proves originalvi CONTENTS.
Page
intercourse the and testsgrammatical glossarial
classifications mustbe real the distribution ofMan
size of areas contrasts in closeethnological geo-
contact and isolation ofgraphical discontinuity
areas oceanic 67-100migrations
CHAPTER IV.
Details of distribution their conventional character
from the circumference to the centreconvergence
and Chaco IndiansFuegians; Patagonian, Pampa,
Peruvians characters otherSouthD'Orbigny's
American Indians of the Missions of Guiana
of Venezuela Guarani Caribs CentralAmerica
Mexican civilization no isolated phenomenon
North American Indians Eskimo ob-apparent
to theirconnectionwith theAmericans and
jections
-Asiatics Tasmanians Australians PoPapuas
Micronesians Hottentotslynesians Malagasi
Kaffres BerbersNegroes Abyssinians
the Semitic andCopts family Primary secondary
migrations 101-157
CHAPTER V.
of theThe UralUgrians Lapland, Finland, Permia,
Mountains and the area of theVolga light-haired
families Turanians the Keltsof Ireland, Scotland,
'
Gaul the Goths the Sarmatians theWales,
of ethno-Greeks and Latins difficulties European
intermixture identificationlogy displacement
of ancient famih'es extinction ofancient families
the Etruscans the isolation the BasksPelasgi
the Albanians classifications and hypotheses
the ...the term Finnic 158-183Indo-European hypothesis
CHAPTER VI.
area the theMon andKhoThe Monosyllabic T'hay
Tables the B'hot the Chinese Burmese
Persia India Tamulian the Brahui thefamily
Dioscurians the Iron Les-Georgians Mizjeji
Armenians Asia Minor Cariansgians Lycians
Conclusion 184-250Paropamisans