Mapping Czech system onto system profiling benchmark

Mapping Czech system onto system profiling benchmark

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Making Social AgenciesFit For The Future Benchmarking VET best practice Assessment and standards Mapping Czech system onto system Curriculum Framework profiling benchmark Accreditation Materials Workshops This material was produced in the framework of the Leonardo da Vinci project 'Making Social Agencies Fit For The Future'. This project was carried out with the support of the Commission of the European Community. The content does not necessarily reflect the 1i position of the European Community, nor does it invoke any responsibility on their part. 1.i Mapping Czech system onto system profiling benchmark Demography The Czech Republic is situated approximately in the geografical centre of Europe and has area of 78 866sq.km. It´s a landlocked country 326 km from Baltic and 322 from Adriatic. It shares borders with Germany (810 km), Poland (762 km) , Austria (466km) and Slovakia (265 km). The highest point of elevation is the peak of MT. Snezka (1602m above sea level) and the lowest point of elevation is near Hronsko where the River Labe leaves Czech territoty (117 m above sea level). Population Growth and Structure Since the mid-1990s (from 1994), the Czech Republic has been showing a steady decline of its populace. If the trend is extrapolated, the current population of 10.3 million could well drop below 10 million around 2015. The current depopulation trend is indicative of an outlook characterised by a permanent natural decrease and ...

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Benchmarking
 
Workshops
Materials
VET best practice Assessment and standards Curriculum Framework Accreditation 
Mapping Czech system onto system profiling benchmark  
1i
M aking Social Agencies Fit For The Future
1.i Mapping Czech system onto system profiling benchmark Demography The Czech Republic is situated approximately in the geografical centre of Europe and has area of 78 866sq.km. It´s a landlocked country 326 km from Baltic and 322 from Adriatic. It shares borders with Germany (810 km), Poland (762 km) , Austria (466km) and Slovakia (265 km). The highest point of elevation is the peak of MT. Snezka (1602m above sea level) and the lowest point of elevation is near Hronsko where the River Labe leaves Czech territoty (117 m above sea level). Population Growth and Structure Since the mid-1990s (from 1994), the Czech Republic has been showing a steady decline of its populace. If the trend is extrapolated, the current population of 10.3 million could well drop below 10 million around 2015. The current depopulation trend is indicative of an outlook characterised by a permanent natural decrease and demographic ageing of the population. The positive balance of foreign migration is not sufficient to make up for the natural losses. The age structure, so far more or less stable, has started changing at the expense of the < 15 years age bracket the share of which dropped from 20.0% to 17.9% between 1992 and 1997, and is estimated to be as low as 14.4% in 2020. The 60+ years age bracket share is maintained at 18.0%, but is expected to rise to 27.0% by 2020. Table 1: Natural population changes per 1,000 inhabitants
Years Live births Deaths Marriages Divorces Natural increment 1945-49 21,3 13,5 9,9 1,13 7,8 1950-54 19,6 11,0 8,9 1,16 8,6 1960-64 14,4 10,3 8,0 1,45 4,1 1970-74 17,0 12,5 9,6 2,38 4,5 1980 14,9 13,1 7,6 2,64 1,8 1985 13,1 12,7 7,8 2,95 0,4 1990 12,6 12,5 8,8 3,09 0,1 1992 11,8 11,7 7,2 2,77 0,1 1994 10,3 11,4 5,7 2,99 -1,1 1996 8,8 10,9 5,2 3,21 -2,1 1997 8,8 10,9 5,6 3,15 -2,1
Source: Population changes in the Czech Republic, Czech Bureau of Statistics
 Table 2: Evolution of the age structure of the population
Year 1950 1961 1970 1980 1991 1993 1995 1998 2000* 2010* 2020*
Age group 0-14 24,1 25,4 21,2 23,4 21,1 20,0 18,8 17,7 16,3 14,5 14,4
15-59 63,5 59,7 59,7 59,8 61,1 62,0 63,2 64,3 65,3 62,5 58,6
60 and more 12,4 14,9 19,1 16,8 17,8 18,0 18,0 18,0 18,4 23,0 27,0
forecast of the Czech Bureau of Statistics, 1997: the mean one out of three * alternatives In the 1990s, the Czech Republic has experienced dynamic changes of demographic behaviour patterns, which some experts view as an accelerated process of the second demographic transition, while others regard them as phenomena accompanying negative consequences of the transformation of the political and economic systems in the 1990s. The current population trend character is determined mainly by a reduced fertility rate, especially with respect to women falling into the youngest age group. In this age bracket, a new model of reproduction behaviour patterns is gradually being established, which is characterised by a postponement of first marriages and child-births until a later age. On the other hand, older generations of women have mostly fulfilled their maternal plans in accordance with the existing reproduction model, there emerges a vacuum of a sort, which is manifested by a reduced number of child-births. This brings about some concerns regarding future population development trends. The reduced fertility rate is connected with a decline of the marriage rate in the 1990s, although the latest available data (and also preliminary data for 1998) indicates that it has stabilised. However, sociological surveys have failed to confirm any major changes in the attitude toward the marriage, which has always been, is, and will probably continue to be the most preferred form of a partnership union and environment for giving birth to and raising children for
the Czech society. a generally accepted cause of the fertility rate is a postponement of marriages and child-births until a later age, and the widespread use of contraception in recent years. However, there also are the well-known social changes, such as a higher level of education and employment, individualisation, broader opportunities of self-realisation etc. Table 3: Birth rate indicators
Year  completedTotal Total fertility pregnancies 1950 1,96 -  1961 1,91 3,50 1970 1,83 3,21 1980 1,86 3,23 1990 1,86 3,67 1992 1,72 3,25 1994 1,44 2,37 1996 1,18 2,12 (1995)
Percentage of live births outside the wedlock 6,3 4,6 5,4 5,6 8,6 10,7 14,5 16,9
Source: Population changes in the Czech Republic, Czech Bureau of Statistics Demographic analyses show that changes in the marriage behaviour pattern and an increasing divorce rate (although the latter certainly has a number of negative social and psychological impacts) significantly affect the birth rate and fertility of women per se. The fertility of women living out of the wedlock, including common-law spouses, is still lower than that of married women. The growth of the absolute number and percentage of post-productive age people after the year 2000 will be a result of both strong population years (with fluctuations corresponding to birth rate fluctuations between the 1950s and 1990s) getting older and an extended mean life expectancy. Between 1990 and 1997, the latter has increased from 67.5 to 70.5 years for men and 75.4 to 77.5 years for women.      
Table 4: Marriage indicators
24,35** 21,60**
Year Marriages Average marriage of first Percentage age of singles marriages Absolute Per 1,000 Men Women Men Women number tsanitabnhi 1950- 81221 8,9 26,37 23,26* * 54 1970- 95078 9,6 74 1980 78343 7,6 1990 90953 8,8 1992 74060 7,2 1994 58440 5,7 1996 53896 5,2 1997 57804 5,6
24,31 21,51 23,96 21,43 91,1 96,2 24,79 22,53 85,7 91,8 26,15 23,93 76,4 82,5 27,12 24,88 71,4 77,1 27,65 25,43 73,1 78,7
* 1950, ** 1970 Source: Population changes in the Czech Republic, Czech Bureau of Statistics Since 1991, the number of the deceased has been permanently declining, and the gross mortality rate dropped from 12.5 in 1991 to 10.9 in 1997 (there was another decline in 1998). This trend is attributable especially to a reduced mortality rate among older age groups, which is in turn caused by a more massive use of medical equipment, importation of more efficient drugs, and probably also by people paying more attention to their own health. The 1996 infant mortality rate of 6 per mille makes the Czech Republic indeed very close to Western European standards and figures. The population policy also comprises educational programmes and campaigns targeting young people. a positive outcome of this policy is a reduction of so-called premature marriage rate by two thirds between 1989 and 1996 (the term denotes marriages in which the partners are between 16 and 17 years of age and the cause of the marriage is the bride´s pregnancy). Education toward marriage and parentage and child care constitute a standard part of the curricula of elementary schools. The institutions that have been founded and operate in this sphere include, for example, "Family Planning Society of the Czech Republic", a non-governmental organisation "Planned Parenthood and Sexual Education", or "Programme of Reproduction Health", a campaign run under the auspices of the Ministry of Health. Both state and non-governmental institutions and parishes offer programmes for engaged couples and substitute family care training courses (adoption, foster care - the courses are being improved at the
moment). The Ministry of Health co-ordinates the "National HIV/AIDS Programme". The range of medical/social services is being expanded for the benefit of older people (there are more women among the clients because of their longer life expectancy, more frequent loneliness, and health problems), and the share of private providers is increasing. The upcoming Social Assistance Act is expected to provide better prerequisites for taking care of seniors within the family and to increase the possibility of a free choice of the received assistance. As a result of the ageing of the population and changed economic conditions, the retirement age will gradually be moved to reach 62 years for men and 61 years for childless women in 2007. The system of care provided to the handicapped comprises a broad range of different forms of assistance, including tax reliefs, financial support in various life situations and depending on the type and degree of the health handicap, a system of institutional and home care provided by governmental and non-governmental organisations, specific forms of education provided by elementary and secondary schools, retraining and resocialisation programmes, including support to employers of the handicapped. Population changes - 1st quarter of 2005  The population of the Czech Republic increased by 3.1 thousand in the 1st quarter of 2005 and as of 31 March stood at 10 223 713. The number of live births was by 724 higher in comparison to 1st quarter of 2004, but the most significant difference showed the number of divorces, which was by 1 136 lower than in the corresponding period of the previous year. The number of marriages entered into was by 225 smaller, so the nuptiality still stagnates on the very low level.  According to the results of the preliminary statistical balance thepopulationof the Czech republic as of 31 March 2005 stood at almost 10 224 thousand, which was by 18 thousands more than a year ago and by 3 thousands more than three months ago. The natural decrease in the 1st quarter of 2005 was almost the same as in the 1st quarter of 2004: the number of deaths exceeded the number of live births by 5 thousand. Since the population decreased by natural decrease the rise in total population resulted only from active balance of international migration. The number of immigrants (11.7 thousand) was similar to the number in the 1st quarter of 2004, whereas the number of emigrants decreased from 12 thousand registered in the first three months of 2004 on 4 thousand registered in the same period of 2005.  The number oflive births1st quarter of 2005 was by 724 higherin the compared to 1st quarter of 2004. As long as this trend continues for the rest of the year, the number of live births in 2005 will exceed the level of one hundred
thousands, again after ten years. But the considerable increase of the total fertility rate (the average number of live births per woman at her childbearing age) cannot be expected because in the age of the highest fertility intensity (27-30 years of age) are still the women born in the seventies (1975-1978), in the years of the significant birth rate rise. The fertility of Czech women remains low from the long-term and international comparison view. There were 31.4 per cent of all live births born outside marriage in the 1st quarter of 2005. It was 30.2 per cent in the 1st quarter of 2004 and 30.6 percent in 2004. Thus, the uninterrupted trend, started in 1988, of the increase of the share of children born to non-married women continues in 2005.  The number ofdeathsin the 1st quarter of 2005 stood at 29.2 thousand, which was by 664 more than in the corresponding period of 2004. After three years long stagnation, the life expectancy at birth for both sexes rose by a half of year in 2004. But the first preliminary data for 2005 showed that the significant growth probably would not be repeated this year. Contrary to the number of all deaths, the number of infant deaths and the level of infant mortality in the period January-March of 2005 were by a little lower than in the first three months of 2004. The infant mortality rate stood at 3.4 infant deaths per 1 000 live births; it was 3.9 per mille in the 1st quarter of 2004 (3.7 per mille in 2004).  The number ofmarriagesentered into during the period January-March of 2005 was only by 225 lower than in the same period of 2004. But the first quarter of the year is the least attractive time for entering into marriage (11 per cent of total number in 2004); larger differences in the nuptiality might occur in the next months. Most likely, the stagnation on the very low level will continue. There were registered 7.9 thousand ofdivorcesthe 1st quarter of 2005. This numberin was by more than one thousand lower than in the 1st quarter of the previous year. The numbers of divorces significantly depend on the number of marriages entered into in the previous years. The highest intensity of divorce rate occur after 3-6 years of duration of marriage, which means that the marriages entered into in the period of 1999-2002 will be the least stable in 2005, and the average number of marriages entered into in that period was by a little lower than in the first half of the nineties. However, the estimate of intensity indicator indicates the chance that the divorce rate could stop rising and the stabilisation on the level close to 50 per cent marriage terminating by divorce is expected. The divorce rate in the Czech Republic is high and during the last 15 years rose by one third.  The favourable trend in abortion rate continued also in the 1st quarter of 2005. The total number ofabortionsdropped by 0.5 thousand (on 10.2 thousand) compared to the 1st quarter of 2004. The legally induced abortions accounted for two thirds of the total number of abortions. Almost eighty per cent of legally induced abortions are abortions performed within 8 weeks of duration of the pregnancy.   
Note  Data source: Demographic statistics – results of processing statistical reports of Obyv series (notifications of the entry into marriage, of birth, of death, of divorce); the migration data source is Alien Information System and the Central Population Register Record. Czech Statistical office receives data from Alien and Border Police Service and Ministry of Interior. Abortion data source is Institute of Health Information and Statistics.  All data for 2005 are preliminary.   Social workers in Czech republic (according particular ministry)  Ministry of Interior- 176 of social workers - social worker specialist– refugee centres administration - social worker specialist – detention centres - social worker – executive council Ministry of Education- 749 of social workers - social worker at special school - social worker at school counselling centre - social worker in residental institution Ministry of Justice- 120 of social workers - social worker in prison probation and mediation service official -Ministry of Health- it´s not possible to find out exact number of social workers nursing sister for social service -- worker for resocialization in psychiatric institution Ministry of Labour and Social Affaires- 7035 of social workers - worker for state social support benefits - worker for social welfare benefits - field social worker - social worker for social - legal protection of children and youth - social worker for area of unemployment policy - social worker for substitute care - social worker for CAN problematic - officer in charge of youth in risk - social therapist Administrative Department – Labour office- 2352 of social workers - negotiator, consultant  + social workers as methodical, conceptual and analytical worker    
Degree and nature of professionalisation  ™ Training and qualification system for social workers  Since Velvet revolution in 1989 social work education has been developed intensively. Social work in the Czech republic can now be studied at three distinct levels: o work academies (three years) Social o Bachelors degree at university (three years) o degree at university (five years) Masters  The Association of Schools of Social Work (ASVSP) was founded in 1993 with the aim of achieving a continuing improvement in the quality of studies. The members of the Association have adopted minimum standards for education in social work (in co-operation with schools in Great Britain, Holland and the USA). They evaluate the knowledge and abilities of graduates in social work to ensure that theses minimum standards are maintained. 18 schools (universities, academies) are full members of the Association and a further five are associate members.  ™ I-VET/C-VET balance and organisation-how organised/structured  C-VET – It is novelty in the Czech republic, we are in the situation of C-VET introduction. At present there is no legislative arrangement for C-VET system for social workers. By Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs exists Section for conception of social services, which set up interactive educational programme overwiev [placed on MLSA websites] in the frame of lifelong education in social field. Database includes entry about lecturers, educators and educational programmes focused on lifelong education of social workers and social services workers. Legislative arrangement of social worker position is missing in mostly all section, where social workers are employed. Basic qualifying education for social workers is not specified. It is required to create legislative arrangement of system of lifelong education for social workers.  In May 2003 the Government approved a report dealing with theStrategy of Lifelong Education of Social Workers and Their Education on Human Rights.The system of education of social workers and of social services providers will be newly regulated by a new Act on Social Workers, which is under preparation. A systemic project is being developed at national level for all workers in the social services sector including a procedure for provision of grant for inter-regional projects to promote lifelong learning and accreditation of educational programmes in the social services area.  I-VET – In the Czech republic exist training courses booked by employers for social workers.  
Social partner involvement  The social services in the |Czech republic are regulated bycentral social administration,public administration and private legal administration.  State administration: - central social administration (Ministries) - statutory social institutions are regulated by autonomy executive council, which is led by Parliament, Cabinet or Minister  Local government: -regions municipalities - Private legal administration- non-profit and profit: - communities, civic |associations, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, church, ... ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  The Government level Participation at Governmental level is implemented by means of Government Councils and Government Committees. The following five bodies play a key role in the area of social inclusion: The Council of Economic and Social Agreement of the CR; The Government Council for Non-State Non-Profit Organisations, the Government Council on Roma Community Affairs; the Government Board for People with Disabilities; and the Council for National Minorities of the Government of the CR.  The Council of Economic and Social Agreementof the CR was established in 1990 to provide a platform for conducting an ongoing dialogue between the Government and social partners. It is a voluntary body established to negotiate issues which takes initiative in areas of employment, social and economic policies.The supreme organ is the Plenary Session, composed of the Prime Minister, seven Government representatives, seven trade union representatives and seven employer representatives. Among its other activities, it also contributes to the gradual establishing of tri-partite structures in the most disadvantaged regions and sectors.  The Government Council for Non-State Non-Profit Organisationswas established in 1992. It is a permanent advisory and co-ordination body with a capacity to take initiative in areas covered by non-governmental organisations (NGOs). The Council is composed of 36 members and is chaired by a member of Government (at present the Deputy Prime Minister for Research, Human Rights and Human Resources). NGO representatives constitute at least one half of the total membership. The rest is composed of representatives of bodies of the State
administration, which are responsible for implementation of State policies related to NGOs, and representatives of co-operating regions. The Council summarises, discusses and submits to the Government information on issues related to NGOs, and submits documents and proposals aimed at the creation of a positive environment for the development of NGO activities.  The Government Council for Roma Community Affairswas established in 1997 as a permanent advisory and initiatory body on issues of specific concern to Roma communities. The Council comprises 28 members and is chaired by a member of Government (at present the Deputy Prime Minister for Research, Human Rights and Human Resources). Representatives of Roma communities form one half of the members (one for each region). The stated objective is to promote the social integration of Roma community. The Council co-ordinates activities undertaken by various ministries, which are responsible for implementation of individual tasks and measures resulting from Government resolutions and international conventions and treaties, by which the CR is bound. The Council summarises, discusses and submits to the Government information on issues related to Roma concerns, including proposals concerning the formulation and implementation of social inclusion policies. It also develops strategies for Roma integration and evaluates the results achieved by implementation of the respective Government resolutions. It has the right to submit proposals on allocation of funding assigned to programmes to promote integration of the Roma community. The Council maintains close co-operation with regional offices and municipalities, with NGOs and with certain international organisations, the activities of which encourage the integration of Roma communities. A new Employment Act has been approved and will come into effect in 2004.  The Government Board for People with Disabilitieswas established in 1991 in the form of a permanent initiatory co-ordination and advisory body called upon to submit to the Government proposals on improving the situation of people with disabilities. The Board is chaired by the Prime Minister and is composed of senior officials of relevant ministries, four deputy chairmen of the Czech National Disability Council (representing people with disabilities in the Council), the chairman of the Union of Czech and Moravian Producer Cooperatives, representing employers who employ people with disabilities, and the Board’ secretary. The Board deals with problems in a cross-sectoral context, i.e. those which involve areas of competence of more than one ministry. Its aim is to promote equal opportunities for people with disabilities in all walks of life. To this end, it develops National Plan for Equalisation of Opportunities for People with Disabilities, and supports and monitors their implementation. It comments all documents and proposals submitted to the Government, which are of special concern to people with disabilities. It co-operates with central public administration institutions which submit to it their proposals for measures regarding issues of people with disabilities, and with civic associations for people with disabilities. It also discusses documents received from the Czech National