Imprints of climatic and environmental change in a regional aquifer system in an arid part of India using noble gases and other environmental tracers [Elektronische Ressource] / put forward by Martin Wieser

English
208 Pages
Read an excerpt
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

Description

Dissertationsubmitted to theCombined Faculties for the Natural Sciences and for Mathematicsof the Ruperto-Carola University of Heidelberg, Germanyfor the degree ofDoctor of Natural SciencesPut forward byDipl. Phys. Martin Wieserborn in Schwabmunc henOral examination: 02.02.2011Imprints of climatic and environmental change in a regionalaquifer system in an arid part of India using noble gases andother environmental tracersReferees:Prof. Dr. Werner Aeschbach-HertigProf. Dr. Augusto ManginiAbstractThe aim of this multi-tracer study is the investigation of palaeoclimate changes in SouthAsia over the last 50,000 years based on data from a groundwater aquifer in North-West14 3 222India. C, H, He isotopes, Rn and SF were used for dating, while stable water6isotopes and excess air allow the reconstruction of palaeohumidity. Temperature recordsare derived by noble gas thermometry. A mass spectrometer setup was optimised, nowallowing to quantify absolute noble gas amounts. Successful cryogenic separation of Arfrom Kr reduced the o set of air equilibrated water standards (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe)to 2.6, 0.5, 0.6, -0.2 and 0.4 % with a reproducibility of 0.2, 0.6, 0.3, 0.7 and 1.2 %, re-14spectively. C dating agreed with a previous study and is con rmed by He-Rn ages. Indeep wells of the sedimentary basin and near fault zones, mantle He was determined tocontribute up to 10% of the total terrigenic He.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2011
Reads 11
Language English
Document size 67 MB
Report a problem

Dissertation
submitted to the
Combined Faculties for the Natural Sciences and for Mathematics
of the Ruperto-Carola University of Heidelberg, Germany
for the degree of
Doctor of Natural Sciences
Put forward by
Dipl. Phys. Martin Wieser
born in Schwabmunc hen
Oral examination: 02.02.2011Imprints of climatic and environmental change in a regional
aquifer system in an arid part of India using noble gases and
other environmental tracers
Referees:
Prof. Dr. Werner Aeschbach-Hertig
Prof. Dr. Augusto ManginiAbstract
The aim of this multi-tracer study is the investigation of palaeoclimate changes in South
Asia over the last 50,000 years based on data from a groundwater aquifer in North-West
14 3 222India. C, H, He isotopes, Rn and SF were used for dating, while stable water6
isotopes and excess air allow the reconstruction of palaeohumidity. Temperature records
are derived by noble gas thermometry. A mass spectrometer setup was optimised, now
allowing to quantify absolute noble gas amounts. Successful cryogenic separation of Ar
from Kr reduced the o set of air equilibrated water standards (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe)
to 2.6, 0.5, 0.6, -0.2 and 0.4 % with a reproducibility of 0.2, 0.6, 0.3, 0.7 and 1.2 %, re-
14spectively. C dating agreed with a previous study and is con rmed by He-Rn ages. In
deep wells of the sedimentary basin and near fault zones, mantle He was determined to
contribute up to 10% of the total terrigenic He. In the crystalline aquifer, high concen-
3 4 4 3trations of Rn (4 Bq/cm ) and radiogenic He (3 10 cm STP/g) were found, and SF6
concentrations showed amounts several orders of magnitude above modern atmospheric
equilibrium. Palaeohumidity is consistently reconstructed by excess air and stable water
isotope data. Both signals reveal a dry glacial period followed by a humid Holocene, which
is interrupted by a dry late Holocene. Monsoonal strength obtained from excess air sup-
ports older palaeoclimate studies of the region. Noble gas temperatures show a cold last
glacial period compared to a warm Holocene, presuming a warming of (3:5 0:5) C. This
record provides the rst quantitative information on palaeotemperature in South Asia.
Zusammenfassung
Ziel dieser Arbeit ist die Untersuchung palaoklimatischer Schwankungen in Sudasien
wahrend der letzten 50.000 Jahre. Hierzu wurde eine Multi-Tracer-Studie an einem Grund-
14 3wasser-Aquifer in Nordwest-Indien durchgefuhrt. Hierbei werden C, H, die Helium-
222Isotopie, Rn und SF zur Altersbestimmung verwendet, wahrend die stabile Wasser-6
isotopie und der Luftuberschuss Aufschluss uber Anderungen der Luftfeuchtigkeit geben.
Die Temperatur wird mittels Edelgasthermometrie rekonstruiert. Die Edelgasmessungen
erfolgen durch Massenspektrometrie, wobei im Rahmen dieser Arbeit eine Messroutine
verbessert wurde, die nun auch eine absolute Quanti zierung der Gasmengen erlaubt.
Erfolgreiche kryogene Gastrennung von Ar und Kr verringert den nachgewiesenen O -
set von mit Luft aquilibrierten Wasser-Standards auf 2.6, 0.5, 0.6, -0.2 und 0.4 % mit
14einer Reproduzierbarkeit von 0.2, 0.6, 0.3, 0.7 und 1.2 %. Die C-Datierung bestatigt
die Alter aus einer fruheren Studie und wird von He-Rn-Altern gestutzt. Tiefe Brun-
nen in der Ebene und nahe der Storzonen weisen mit 10% des terrigenen Heliums eine
4 4Mantel-Signatur auf. Wasser mit kristalliner Herkunft zeigen starke radiogene He- (310
3 3cm STP/g) und Rn-Konzentrationen (4 Bq/cm ) sowie SF -Konzentrationen, die mehrere6
Gro enordn ungen ub er dem aktuellen atmospharischen Gleichgewicht liegen. Die Feuchte-
Historie weist auf ein trockenes Glazial gefolgt von einem niederschlagsreichen Holozan hin,
mit einer vorubergehenden Trockenperiode im Spatholozan. Die Ergebnisse bestatigen da-
mit altere Studien ub er das Monsunverhalten der Region. Die Edelgastemperaturen sind
die ersten quantitativen Palaotemperatur-Ergebnisse fur Sudasien und zeigen ein kaltes
Glazial verglichen mit einem um (3:5 0:5) C warmeren Holozan.
3Contents
1. Introduction 13
2. Basics 15
2.1. General Hydrogeology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.1.1. Groundwater ow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.1.2. Transport models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.1.3. Ground temperatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.2. Region of Gujarat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.2.1. Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.2.2. Monsoon and Palaeoclimate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.3. Environmental Tracers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.3.1. Stable Isotopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.3.2. Tritium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.3.3. Carbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.3.4. Carbonate dating of groundwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.3.5. Sulphur hexa uoride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
2.3.6. Noble gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
2.3.7. Equilibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
2.3.8. Modelling of excess air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
2.3.9. Non-atmospheric components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
2.3.10. Fitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3. Sampling campaigns 59
3.1. Sampling Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.1.1. Hydrogeology of the sampling area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3.1.2. Realisation of well-sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3.2. Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
3.3. Samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4. Methods 69
4.1. Multiparameter probe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
4.2. Stable Isotopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.3. Tritium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.4. Carbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.4.1. Extraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
5Contents Contents
4.4.2. Measurement via AMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
4.5. SF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 746
4.5.1. Sample treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.5.2. Gas chromatographic measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
4.6. Noble gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.6.1. MS Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.6.2. MS measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
4.6.3. Data Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
4.7. Radon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
5. Results 91
5.1. In-situ eld data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.2. Dating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.2.1. Tritium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.2.2. Carbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
5.2.3. Radon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
5.2.4. Helium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
5.2.5. SF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1086
5.2.6. Summary for the palaeoclimate group P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
5.2.7. for group CRY: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
5.3. Palaeoclimate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
5.3.1. Stable Isotopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
5.3.2. Noble Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
5.3.3. Results of noble gas tting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
6. Summary 129
6.1. Discussion of laboratory methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
6.2.ion of hydrogeology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
6.3. Discussion of the palaeoclimate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
6.4. Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
A. Monsoon 133
B. Methods 135
B.1. Used eld chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
B.2. Noble gas measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
B.2.1. Heidelberg MS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
B.2.2. Desorption curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
B.2.3. \Ghost" krypton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
B.2.4. Performance tests of the current method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
B.2.5. Measurement in the mass spectrometer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
B.2.6. Run54 evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
B.2.7. Preparing for tting software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
6Contents Contents
C. Fieldbook entries of the sampling sites 157
D. Further results 173
D.1. Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
D.2. Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
D.2.1. Noble 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
References 204
7