Indian biography, or, an historical account of those individuals who have been distinguished among the North American natives as orators, warriors, statesmen, and other remarkable characters
330 Pages
English

Indian biography, or, an historical account of those individuals who have been distinguished among the North American natives as orators, warriors, statesmen, and other remarkable characters

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UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Jjarungton JM-emorial J_ year 1834,Act of Congress,according toEntered, Brothers,Harper &,By of Nc* YarkSouthern DistrictOffice of theIn the Clerk's — — — CONTENTS. t CHAP. I.— MassachusettsNotices of Indians who submitted to continued—The Medlbrd—Her history, fam-Sruaw-Sachem of ily, &c.—Sagamore John and Sagamore James—Their inter- course with the English—Anecdotes of them—Complaints, ser- vices, death Chickatabot, Sachem of Nepon-and character set—His war with the Squaw-Sachem—Visits Boston severa times his—Appears in court against Plastowe—Anecdotes of Government compared with—Indian policy of Massachusetts that ofPlymouth—Anecdotes of Chickatabot—His death, page 9 CHAP. II.—Farther account of Master Weston's settlement, and the movements Aspinet, the Nau-of the Indians against him set, supposed to bft engaged in that affair—His tribe and power —Provocations from the English—Magnanimous revenge of the Sachem intercourse—His hospitality and kindness—Friendly with Plymouth-Is visited by Governor Bradford— CaptainBy Standish-Is suspected of liostility by Plymouth, and pursued IrANOUoH, theby Standish—His death—Career and character of ' Courteous and pursuedSachem of Cummaquid'—Is suspected —His death. --.... ---24 CHAP. III.

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UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
Jjarungton JM-emorial J_<ibraryBIOGRAPHY;INDIAN
OR,
AN HISTOKICAL ACCOUNT
OF THOSE
INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE BEEN DISTINGUISHED AMONG
THE NORTH AMERICAN NATIVES
AS
ORATORS, WARRIORS, STATESMEN,
AND
OTHER REMARKABLE CHARACTERS.
BY B.K THATCHER, ESQ.
IW TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.
NEW YORK:
HARPEa & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,
329 & 331 PEARL STREET
FRANKLIN SQUARE.
1860.in th<> year 1834,Act of Congress,according toEntered,
Brothers,Harper &,By
of Nc* YarkSouthern DistrictOffice of theIn the Clerk's— — —
CONTENTS.
t
CHAP. I.— MassachusettsNotices of Indians who submitted to
continued—The Medlbrd—Her history, fam-Sruaw-Sachem of
ily, &c.—Sagamore John and Sagamore James—Their inter-
course with the English—Anecdotes of them—Complaints, ser-
vices, death Chickatabot, Sachem of Nepon-and character
set—His war with the Squaw-Sachem—Visits Boston severa
times his—Appears in court against Plastowe—Anecdotes of
Government compared with—Indian policy of Massachusetts
that ofPlymouth—Anecdotes of Chickatabot—His death, page 9
CHAP. II.—Farther account of Master Weston's settlement, and
the movements Aspinet, the Nau-of the Indians against him
set, supposed to bft engaged in that affair—His tribe and power
—Provocations from the English—Magnanimous revenge of the
Sachem intercourse—His hospitality and kindness—Friendly
with Plymouth-Is visited by Governor Bradford— CaptainBy
Standish-Is suspected of liostility by Plymouth, and pursued
IrANOUoH, theby Standish—His death—Career and character of
' Courteous and pursuedSachem of Cummaquid'—Is suspected
—His death. --.... ---24
CHAP. III. Nations—Their—Summary account of the Five
early history—Government—Conquests—Population—Territory
—Intercourse with the European Colonies—Their war with tlio
Adirondacks negotiations—Adventures of Piskabet—
with the French, in 1684—Anecdotes of the Onondaga Chief
Gara .igula—His speech at the Council, and effects of it—Re-
marks Nationson his character—History of the Five continued
to the time of Adario—His exploits—Their object and results
—War between the Confederates and the French—Advei\tures------ --34of Black-Kettle.
CHAP. IV.—FiTE Nations continued—Remarks on their oratory
—Circumstances favorable to it—Account of a council of the
Confederates at 1690Onondaga, in —Anecdotes of various per-
sons who attended it—Speeches of Sadekanatie and other or-
—ators Adarahta—The history and character of Decanesora
His speeches at the Albany council of 1694—Style of his elo-
quence—His personal and political—Other speeches
and negotiations—Anecdotes of Sadekawatte. - - 49— ——
VI CONTENTS.
CHAP. V Account of the Ottawas—Their first Chief-Sachem
Major Ro-known to the English, Pontiac—Hia interview with
gers—Protects that officer and his troops—Saves Detroit from an
army of Indians—Hostility of the northern tribes to the English,
after the conquest ofCanada—Adventures ofHesrv—Anecdotes
MiNATATANA—Supposed feelings of Pontiac towards the En-of
glish—His great project of combination. - - . - 70
— commences activeCHAP. VI.—PosTiAc's plan of campaign He
preparations Council of the Ottawas—Grand Council of the—
Northern tribes—Dream of the Delaware—Maxims promulga-
his alliested by Pontiac—Estimate of the number and force of
—Commencement of the war—Surprisal of nine English posts
—mode of surpiisal—Artifice adopted at Michilimackinac, and
in personresult—Reduction of Detroit undertaken by Pontiac
His interview with the Commandant—His plan discovered,—
and the surprise prevented—Letter from Detroit. - - 83
CHAP. VII.—Siege of Detroit maintained by Pontiac—The Cora
mandant meditates a retreat—The French propose a conference
with Pontiac, which takes place—The latter demands the
surrender of the fort, which the Commandant refuses—Vigor-
ous renewal of hostilities—Advantages gained by the Indian
army—arrival of succor to the English—Battle of Bloody Bridge
—Pontiac at length raises the siege—Causes of it—The Indians
—His subsequent career until death Anecdotesmake peace his —
illustrating his influence, energy, magnanimity, integrity and
genius—His authority as chieftain—His talents as an orator
fame. ----__. 98His traditionary
CHAP. VIII.—Account of the Delawares—Their ancient great
men, including Tamenesd—History during the Revolutionary
one,A^ar—Two Parties among them—White-Eyes, leader of
and Captain Pipe, of the other—Manoeuvres, speeches, plots
and counter-plots of these men, their parties, and foreigner?
White-Eyes inconnected with both—Anecdotes—Death of
respect his memory - - 1281780—Tribute of paid to
-CHAP. IX.—Observations on the character of White-Eyes-
Pipe's comment on his death—The latter gains and sustains an
ascendancy in the Delaware nation Glickhican, Netaw at-
wEEs and"WiyGEMUsD—Subsequent career of Pipe—Joins the
British and fights against the Americans—Grand Indian coun-
cil at Detroit—Pipe's spirited speech on that occasion—Makes
charges against the Missionaries, but fails to prove them—Re-
his habits, principles and talents. - . - 136marks on
CHAP. X.—State of several Southern tribes during the last cen-
1756tury—The English send deputies to the Cherokees, in
Their lives threatened, and saved by Attaktjllakclla—.Ac-
count of that Chieftain and his principles—The party opposed
into him headed by Occonostdta—War with the Colonies
1759 and two years following—Anecdotes of both these Chiefs
9