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Maladie d'Alzheimer et maladies apparentées prise en charge des troubles du comportement perturbateurs - Alzheimer's disease-Management of behavioural disorders - Quick Reference Guide - Version anglaise

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2 Pages
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La reco2clics ci-dessus s'appuie sur les documents suivants :Recommandation - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateursArgumentaire - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateurs Mis en ligne le 08 juin 2012 Ces recommandations portent sur la prise en charge des troubles du comportement jugés par l’entourage (aidants et proches, professionnels intervenant auprès du patient, autres patients, etc.) comme dérangeants, perturbateurs, dangereux, que ce soit pour le patient ou pour autrui (opposition, agitation, agressivité, comportements moteurs aberrants, desinhibition, cris, idées délirantes, hallucinations, troubles du rythme veille-sommeil). Les troubles du comportement déficitaires ou de retrait (apathie, repli sur soi, dépression), également fréquents au cours de la maladie d’Alzheimer et des maladies apparentées, et leur prise en charge ne sont pas traités dans ces RBP.Ces recommandations visent à :homogéiser les pratiques en termes de diagnostic, de prévention et de traitement des troubles du comportement perturbateurs ;promouvoir les techniques de soins non médicamenteuses ;éviter les prescriptions inappropriées, systématiques ou prolongées de psychotropes, en particulier de sédatifs et de neuroleptiques. Documents complémentaires Recommandation - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateurs ( 486,75 Ko) Argumentaire - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateurs ( 885,98 Ko) Recommandation - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateurs ( 486,75 Ko) Argumentaire - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateurs ( 885,98 Ko) La reco2clics ci-dessus s'appuie sur les documents suivants :Recommandation - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateursArgumentaire - Maladie d'Alzheimer : troubles du comportement perturbateurs Mis en ligne le 08 juin 2012

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Published 08 June 2012
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QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions: Management of behavioural disorders  May 2009
KEYMESSAGES · Behavioural disorders (BDs) are of multifactorial origin. They may be determined by:  environmental factors, associated with the surroundings, family and friends, carers and health professionals;   factors relating specifically to the individual or the condition. Priority areas for investigation are somatic and psychiatric causes, trigger factors and predisposing factors. · Appropriate non-pharmacological methods should be used as the first-line treatment for BDs. · Psychotropic agents are not effective in preventing the onset of BDs. · prescribed unless an assessment has been carried outTreatment with psychotropic agents must not be  in cases of refusal to coo erate, shoutin and wanderin .  
Behavioural disorders include the following: delirious ideas, hallucinations, refusal to cooperate, agitation, aggression, abnormal motor behaviour, disinhibition, shouting, wake-sleep cycle disorders.  Behavioural disorders involve symptoms of different types, but which have common characteristics: · they are common in these conditions; · they often indicate a change from the patient’s previous behaviour; · they are often of variable intensity or episodic; · interdependent, often associated, and interact with each other.they are
I.
Aetiology and approach to diagnosis
The recommended approach is as follows: · assess the degree of urgency, danger or functional risk in the short term for the patient and for others; · to family and friends (how long the behaviour has beentalk to and examine the patient and talk going on, circumstances in which it occurs); · investigate an environmental cause, somatic cause (urine retention, infection, acute pain, faecaloma, etc.) or psychiatric cause (severe anxiety) to be treated as a priority, together with iatrogenic factors; · the extent to which it occurs andundertake a more in-depth clinical assessment of the behaviour, its implications; · repeat this aetiological review at different points of the patient’s management if the problem persists. The patient’s behaviour should be observed when he is alone and when interacting with other people, at different points of the patient’s management.  In the event of any problems persisting after several days, they should be assessed using a tool such as the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI). The NPI is an inventory of the 12 symptoms most frequently reported in Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions, which assesses their frequency and severity, together with the