middle-school-score-tutorial

middle-school-score-tutorial

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®PSAT/NMSQT Score Report Tutorial for Middle School Students and college exploration tool. You’ve already taken Includes: the first step toward • Personality Profiler: an How Did I Do?college! online assessment you ®By taking the PSAT/NMSQT can take to learn about Are you in Middle School (6th–8th grade)? in middle school, you got a your personality type and head start on college. The test Yes? Then relax. The PSAT/NMSQT receive major and career shows you firsthand the kinds suggestionsshows skills you’ll need before entering of reading, math, and writing • Sixty-seven profiles of aca-college. It does not expect someone skills you’ll need to succeed in demic fields college. Use your PSAT/NMSQT • Articles covering more your age to compete with high school Score Report to find out what than 450 occupations juniors who take the test.you need to learn. Then choose • Sample SAT higher-level math the courses that will put you on questions. the road to college. It’s never questions you got wrong. Then • Student-written sample SAT Prepare for the next too early to start planning for look at your test book. essays. your future—with the help of time you take the • Did the questions cover mate- Make sure you have this Score your parents, teachers, and school PSAT/NMSQT.rial you haven’t learned yet? Report and your test book with counselor. Once you’ve zeroed in on your • Did you get the easy questions you when you visit own strengths and weaknesses, right and ...

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You’ve already taken the first step toward college! ® By taking the PSAT/NMSQT in middle school, you got a head start on college. The test shows you firsthand the kinds of reading, math, and writing skills you’ll need to succeed in college. Use your PSAT/NMSQT Score Report to find out what you need to learn. Then choose the courses that will put you on the road to college. It’s never too early to start planning for your future—with the help of your parents, teachers, and school counselor.
If the test seemed hard—it should. It’s meant for high school juniors. Were there lots of words you didn’t know? Could you solve some of the math problems but not many others? Relax! And don’t pay much attention to your scores. The PSAT/NMSQT is not testing what you know now, but what you will need to know later. Normally you wouldn’t take the PSAT/NMSQT until your junior year. So the longer you’re in school and the harder you work, the more your scores will improve.
How good are your skills? Use your PSAT/NMSQT Score Report to find out. The information on the Score Report will help you identify the skills you already have and those you need to develop. First take a close look at the Review Your Answers section. Locate the
® PSAT/NMSQT Score Report Tutorial for Middle School Students
How Did I Do? Are you in Middle School (6th–8th grade)? Yes? Then relax. The PSAT/NMSQTshows skills you’ll need before entering college. It does not expect someoneyour age to compete with high school juniors who take the test.
questions you got wrong. Then look at your test book. • Didthe questions cover mate-rial you haven’t learned yet? • Didyou get the easy questions right and leave the harder ones blank? (Remember, the “easy” questions are easy forjuniors.) • Didyou guess when you didn’t know the answer? Now look at the Improve Your Skills section. Based on your answers to the test questions, this section shows you skills that you need to improve. Read and follow the suggestions for tips on how to strengthen the skills you’ll need for high school and college. Learn how to guess. When you don’t know the answer to a multiple-choice question, do you make “wild guesses” or “educated guesses”? Guessing wildly means that you pick any answer when you don’t know which is correct. Educated guessing means that you eliminate answer choices you know are wrong and guess from the remaining ones. With educated guessing, the more choices you can eliminate, the better your chances of picking the right answer. Try it.
Prepare for the next time you take the PSAT/NMSQT. Once you’ve zeroed in on your own strengths and weaknesses, the best way to get ready for the test is to work hard in your regular classes and read as much as possible. Before taking the test again, you will be given a copy of theOfficial Student Guide to the PSAT/NMSQT. Review all the sample questions, study the test-taking tips and strategies, and take the practice test. Get a good night’s sleep before the test, and be sure to eat breakfast.
Online Resource to Get the Most Out of Your Score Report: PSAT/NMSQT Extra. PSAT/NMSQT Extra helps you get the most out of the PSAT/NMSQT to help you ® prepare for the SATand for college. Go online towww.collegeboard.com/psatextra for free access to the following information and tools: • Explanationsfor the answers to every question on the 2005 PSAT/NMSQT. • MyRoad: career, major,
and college exploration tool. Includes: • PersonalityProfiler: an online assessment you can take to learn about your personality type and receive major and career suggestions • Sixty-sevenprofiles of aca-demic fields • Articlescovering more than 450 occupations • SampleSAT higher-level math questions. • Student-writtensample SAT essays. Make sure you have this Score Report and your test book with you when you visit www.collegeboard.com/psatextra. If you do not already have a College Board account, you’ll be prompted to create one. (You can use the same account to register for the SAT.) It typically takes less than two minutes to create your free account.
The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is cosponsored by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation.
College Board, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. Connect to college success and MyRoad are trademarks owned by the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Visit College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com.