Plan de cours  BIO 1300-01
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Plan de cours BIO 1300-01

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HUMAN ANIMAL BIO 1300 Professor : Françoise Cossette, Ph. D. Faculty : Science Department : Biology Office : Gendron, room 304 Phone number : 562-5800 extension 6662 E-mail : fcosset@netcom.ca Academic year : 2001 Semester : Winter rd thSessional dates: from 3 of January through 30 of April rdCourses begin: 3 of January thCourses end: 9 of April th rdStudy break: from 19 to 23 of February Number of hours per week: : 3 Number of credits : 3 Lecturing : Tuesday : 11h30 to 13h00, CBY C03 Friday : 13h00 to 14h30, MRN AUD Available hours : Tuesday : 10h00 to 11h00 Friday : 10h00 to 12h30 1 Course content - The general objective of this course is to get students familiar with the biology of the human species, with respect to its anatomy and physiology as well as its ecological and taxonomic position within the animal kingdom. Its origin, evolution and the biological meanings of its races, cultures and societies will also be treated in this course. - This course is divided into three chapters. The first chapter, which is introductory, deals with some concepts of homeostasis and health in human being as well as the different levels of structural organisation of the human body. The caracteristics of life and the scientific method used to gather knowledges on life will also be discussed. Since the human body is made up of a collection of complex organic compounds, ...

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HUMAN ANIMAL BIO 1300 Professor : Françoise Cossette, Ph. D. Faculty : Science Department : Biology Office : Gendron, room 304 Phone number : 562-5800 extension 6662 E-mail :fcosset@netcom.caAcademic year : 2001 Semester : Winter rd th Sessional dates: from 3 of January through 30 of April rd Courses begin: 3 of January th Courses end: 9 of April th rd Study break: from 19 to 23 of February Number of hours per week: : 3 Number of credits : 3 Lecturing : Tuesday : 11h30 to 13h00, CBY C03 Friday : 13h00 to 14h30, MRN AUD Available hours : Tuesday : 10h00 to 11h00  Friday : 10h00 to 12h30
1 Course content - The general objective of this course is to get students familiar with the biology of the human species, with respect toits anatomy andphysiologyas wellas its ecological and taxonomic positionwithin the animal kingdom.Its origin, evolutionand the biological meanings of its races, cultures and societies will also be treated in this course. - This course is divided into three chapters.The first chapter, which is introductory, deals with some conceptsof homeostasis and healthhuman being as well as the different in levels of structural organisationof the human body.The caracteristics of life and the scientific method used to gather knowledges on life will also be discussed. Since the human body is made up of a collection of complex organic compounds, a part of this chapter will be devoted to a brief description ofthe four major classes of biochemical moleculeswich are essential to life: these are glucids, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. -The chapter twomakes a study ofthe celland its components and also discusses about the four major types ofprimary tissuesin the human animal, which are in turn divided into important subtypes. This chapter aslo incorporatesthe organs as structures being part of the different functional organic systems. -Structure and function ofchromosomes,cell cycle andsome genes and heredity-related conceptswill be mentionned inchapter three.-Chapters four through twelvewill be devoted to the study of the major body systems of the human animal. These are:digestive, respiratory, circulatory, immune, urinary, nervous, skeleton/muscular, endocrine and reproductive. These organic systems will be studied with respect totheir contribution to maintaining homeostasis and health in Human. -The thirteenth chapterfocuss on will the evolution of the human species, races, cultures and society. Since humans are in constant interaction with other biotic and abiotic components of the environment,important ecological principleswill be brought to attention. Human species is also involved and concernedwith some environmental issuessuchs as overpopulation, overexploitation leading to depletion of natural resources and pollution. These topics will be discussed at the end of this chapter.
2 Specific objectives - After attending this course, students should be able to : 1) Explain the two concepts of homeostasis and health in human being. 2) Describe the levels of structural organisation and the functional caracteristics of the human body. 3) Identify the important steps of the scientific method and make a short description of each step. ----------4) Make a description of the principal components of the cell in terms of their structure and function. 5) Make a description of the principal types of primary tissues and classify them into subtypes 6) Explain the two concepts of organs and organic systems. 7) Make a distinction between interactional and reductional approach. ----------8) Describe the structure and function of chromosome. 9) Name and describe the different steps of a cell cycle in eukaryotic cells. 10) Discuss the structure of DNA and RNA and discuss about their involvement in protein synthesis. 11) Explain some genetic principles according to Mendel. ----------12) With respect to every organic system of the human animal : - describe its anatomy and physiology, - discuss about its contribution in keeping health and homeostasis. ----------13) Make a discussion about the evolution of human species, races, cultures and societies 14) Describe some ecological principles such as: biosphere, biome, ecosystem, trophic levels, food chain, succession… 15) Discuss about some environmental issues such as overpopulation, depletion of natural resources and pollution. ----------
3 Teaching approach - The material will be presented by lecturing. Explanations will be brought especially on overheads,blackboardand frequently by PowerPoint lecture outline slides. Students are encouraged to attend every class to take complete notes.POWERPOINT OUTLINES AND SETS OF QUESTIONSWILL BE DISTRIBUTED AT THE BEGINNING OF EACH CHAPTER. - I encourage students to ask questions in class so that certain concepts, which will not have been understood totally during explanations, are made clearer. This procedure will have other colleagues take advantage of your questions. - I also encourage students to take advantage of my available hours in order to obtain information or complementary explanations which could improve your understanding of the material treated during each class. Appointment must be fixed before or after a class, by telephoning or through electronic mail. Exams and marks - Student knowledges will be evaluated by two exams: th Midterm (40%)February, from 13h00 to 14h30.16 of : Friday, Final exam (60%)to be determined by the University.: date - Exams will be made up of these possible types of question: 1)short answer questions; 2)sentences to be completed; 3)multiple-choices; 4) questions « true or false »; 5) matching tests; 6) figures to be completed; 7) some developmental questions might be included. - Exams will cover the overall material seen during the class. Attendance to class is essential since students will have to take notes. Complementary readings are recommanded. Manuals rd 1) Chiras, D. D. 1999 (3 édition) Human Biology, Health, Homeostasis and the Environment Toronto: Jones and Bartlett Publishers This manual should be helpful in answering the questions distributed in class. Most questions will cover the essential of BIO 1300 course.MANY EXAM QUESTIONS WILL BE CONSTRUCTED FROM THIS LEARNING TOOL.
4 Table of contents WEEK #1 (Jan. 9 and 12) Chapter 1 : Introduction (p. 1) 1.1) Homeostasis and health (p. 4) 1.2) Functional characteristics of the human body (p. 7) 1.3) Levels of structural organisation (p. 75) 1.4) Scientific method (p.12) 1.5) Major biological molecules (p. 35) WEEK #2 (Jan. 16 and 19) Chapter 2: Cells, tissues, organs and organic systems (p. 39) 2.1) Cell components and their function (p. 44) A) Cytoplasmic membrane B) Nucleus C) Cytoplasm D) Mitochondria E) Endoplasmic reticulum F) Golgi apparatus G) Lysosomes H) Ribosomes I) Cytoskeleton J) Relations between components 2.2) Tissues (p. 76) A) Epithelium B) Connective C) Muscular D) Nervous 2.3) Organs and systems (p. 85) 2.4) Interactional approach versus reductional approach (p. 86) WEEK #3 (Jan. 23 and 26) Chapter 3 : Genetics (p. 337) 3.1) Chromosomes : structure and function (p.340) 3.2) Cell cycle : interphase and cell division (p. 338) 3.3) Genes : DNA and RNA; protein synthesis (p. 388) 3.4) Principles of heredity : Mendelian genetics (genotype and phenotype, dominant and recessive traits) (p. 362)
WEEK #4 (Jan. 30 and Feb. 2) Chapter 4 : Digestive system (p. 101) 4.1) Anatomy and physiology (p. 116) A) Mouth B) Pharynx C) Esophagus D) Stomach E) Small intestine and related glands F) Large intestine 4.2) Essential nutrients A) Macronutrients (p. 104) B) Micronutrients (p. 113) 4.3) Metabolism (p. 63) 4.4) Health of digestive system (p. 127) WEEK #5 (Feb. 6 and 9) Chapter 5 : Respiratory system (p. 197) 5.1) Anatomy and physiology (p. 198) A) Air conducting portion B) Gaseous exchange portion 5.2) Gaz exchange (p. 202) A) Components involved B) Mechanism of gaz exchange 5.3) Health of the respiratory system (p. 209) WEEK #6 (Feb. 13; Midterm: Feb. 16) Chapter 6 : Circulatory system (p. 133) 6.1) Anatomy and physiology (p. 135) A) Hearth B) Blood vessels C) Pulmonary and systemic circulations 6.2) Blood (p. 156) A) Plasma B) Blood cells (RBC, WBC, platelets 6.3) Hearth rate (p. 138) 6.4) Health of circulatory system (p. 140)
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th rd WEEK #7Study week: of FebruaryFrom 19 to 23 Chapter 7 : Immune system (p. 168) (Sets of questions to be worked at home) 7.1) Anatomy and physiology of the lymphatic system (p. 149) 7.2) Infectious agents (p. 169) A) Viruses B) Bacteria 7.3) Defence mechanisms (p. 170) A) Non specific defences B) Specific defences 7.4) Diseases of the immune system (p. 185) WEEK #8: (Feb. 27 and March 2) Chapter 8 : Urinary system (p. 217)8.1) Anatomy and physiology (p. 219) A) Kidneys B) Ureters C) Bladder D) Urethra E) Urine F) Vessels associated to kidneys 8.2) Nephron (p. 222) A) Nephron anatomy B) Nephron physiology 8.3) Water balance (p. 224) 8.4) Health of urinary system (p. 226) WEEK #9 (March 6 and 9) Chapter 9 : Nervous system (p. 235) 9.1) Anatomy and physiology (p. 236) A) Overview of the nervous system B) Structure and function of the neuron C) Central nervous system D) Peripheral nervous system 9.2) Sense organs (eye, ears, nose, tong, skin) (p. 266) 9.3) Learning and memory (p. 260)
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WEEK #10 (March 13 and 16) Chapter 10 : Skeleton and muscular systems (p. 293) 10.1) Anatomy and physiology A) Skeleton system (p. 294) B) Muscular system (p. 302) 10.2) Muscle contraction (p. 303) 10.3) Osteoporosis (p. 302) WEEK #11 (March 20 and 23) Chapter 11 : Endocrine system (p. 314) 11.1) Anatomy and physiology (p. 318) A) Glands and their secretion 11.2) Types of hormones, their mechanism of secretion and their action on the cell (p. 315) 11.3) Health and environment (p. 332) WEEK #12 (March 27 and 30) Chapter 12 : Reproductive system and human development (p. 422) 12.1) Anatomy and physiology A) Male reproductive system (p. 423) B) Female reproductive system (p. 432) 12.2) Birth control (p. 439) 12.3) Sexual transmitted diseases (p. 445) 12.4) Fertilization and pregnancy (p. 454) 12.5) Pre-embryonic, embryonic and fetal development (p. 456) 12.6) Childbirth and lactation (p. 463) 12.7) Aging and death (p. 467) WEEK 13 (April 3 and 6) Chapter 13 : Evolution, Ecologie and Environment (p. 477) 13.1) Evolution of life (p. 478) 13.2) Human evolution (Homo sapiens) (p. 503) 13.3) Principles of ecology (biosphere, biomes, ecosystems…) (p. 516) 13.4) Environmental issues: Overpopulation, pollution and depletion of resources (p. 538) th th PRE-EXAM STUDY BREAK : 10 and 11 of April th th FINAL EXAMINATIONS : 12 to 30 of April
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