“While conceptually sound, most of these attempts at water management have been failures.  The reason

“While conceptually sound, most of these attempts at water management have been failures. The reason

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Watershed Planning and ManagementToward a Report Card for Cayuga LakeLinda P. Wagenet, Ph.D.Development SociologyCornell UniversityMarch 2008Watersheds as socially-defined systemsDoes a watershed represent an ecosystem?Is a watershed a useful metaphor for an ecosystem?Source: USACE 1950Managing resources on a watershed basis…“While conceptually sound, most of these attempts at water management have been failures. The reason is that society is not organized around hydrological boundaries…In considering the best spatial arrangements for water policy, we should remind ourselves of the fact that regions do not have ‘truth’—they only have utility…If so, there is an urgent need to define water regions as something other than river basins. Problem-sheds are what we have in mind.” (Foster and Rogers 1988)Stakeholder Involvement -Overview• Lack of public input in the planning process leads to barriers to successful environmental management • Involvement works well at the local level with an ongoing process of community participation and collective learning (NRC 1999) Public ParticipationIntermunicipal OrganizationEducationFact Finding & TechnicalWatershed Management PlanCayuga Lake WatershedRestoration and Protection Plan• Initial conversations – late 1990s• NYS DOS funding– Three year process– Town of Ledyard municipal partner– Develop a management plan– “Assessment of current socio-economic and ecological conditions of the ...

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Watershed Planning and Management
Toward a Report Card for Cayuga Lake
Linda P. Wagenet, Ph.D.
Development Sociology
Cornell University
March 2008Watersheds as socially-defined
systems
Does a
watershed
represent an
ecosystem?
Is a watershed a
useful metaphor
for an
ecosystem?
Source: USACE 1950Managing resources on a
watershed basis…
“While conceptually sound, most of these attempts at
water management have been failures. The reason is
that society is not organized around hydrological
boundaries…In considering the best spatial
arrangements for water policy, we should remind
ourselves of the fact that regions do not have
‘truth’—they only have utility…If so, there is an
urgent need to define water regions as something
other than river basins. Problem-sheds are what we
have in mind.” (Foster and Rogers 1988)Stakeholder Involvement -
Overview
• Lack of public input in the planning process
leads to barriers to successful environmental
management
• Involvement works well at the local level with
an ongoing process of community participation
and collective learning (NRC 1999) Public Participation
Intermunicipal Organization
Education
Fact Finding & Technical
Watershed Management PlanCayuga Lake Watershed
Restoration and Protection Plan
• Initial conversations – late 1990s
• NYS DOS funding
– Three year process
– Town of Ledyard municipal partner
– Develop a management plan
– “Assessment of current socio-economic and ecological
conditions of the Cayuga Lake Watershed”
• Therefore, from the beginning, stakeholders involved
in the process• NYSORPS
• Tioga County Department of Economic
Development and Planning
• United States Geological Survey
• Tiof
• USDA – NRCS
Environmental Health
• Wells College
• Tioga County S&WCD
• Tompkins County CCE
• Significant contributors:
• Tompkins County Municipal Officials’
• Sharon Anderson, TCCCE
Association
• Clifford Callinan, NYSDEC
• Tompkins County Planning Department
• Michelle Debwah, G/FLRPC
• Tompkins County S&WCD
• Steven Eidt, NYSDEC Region 7
• Tompkins County WRC
• Sylvia Hurlbut, Town of Ledyard
• Town of Ledyard
• Tom Jazikoff, Montezuma NWR
• NYSDEC, Division of Fish, Wildlife &
• Robert L. Johnson, Cornell University
Marine Resources
• William Kappel, USGS
• NYSDEC, Division of Water
• Jose Lozano, City of Ithaca
•C Region 7
• Jim Malyj, Seneca County S&WCD
• NYSDE8
• Elizabeth Moran, EcoLogic
•C, Wildlife Resources Center -
• Pamela O’Malley, CNYRP&DB
New York Natural Heritage Program
• Tom Pearson, NYSDEC Region 8
• New York State Department of Health
• James R. Peek, NYSDEC
• NYSDOS, Division of Coastal
Resources • Richard Perrin, G/FLRPC• Thomas L. Chiotti, Bureau of Fisheries,
• Tim Pezzolesi, Cayuga County CCE
Division of Fish and Wildlife,
• John Roebig, EcoLogic
NYSDEC
• Daniel Sawchuck, NYSDEC Region 7
• Jerry Coder, Education, Public
• Craig Schutt, Tompkins County
Participation & Outreach Committee
S&WCD
• Nicholas Colas, Cayuga County
• Al Smith, G/FLRPC
Planning Department
• A. Thomas Vawter, Wells College
• Daniel S. Dineen, Cortland County
• Linda Wagenet, Cornell CfE
Department of Planning
• Nicole Weiss, G/FLRPC
• Jim Eckler, Bureau of Wildlife,
• David Zorn, G/FLRPC
NYSDEC Region 8
• John Ferranti, Atlantic States Legal
• Others who contributed: Foundation
• John M. Andersson, Tompkins County • John Fessenden, CLWN
DOH
• Dave Forness, NYSDEC Region 7
• Amanda Barber, Cortland County
• Tracy Gingrich, Montezuma NWR
SWCD
• Deb Grantham, Education, Public
• Jacquie Bow, Tompkins County
Participation & Outreach Committee
Planning Department
• Brian Hall, Cortland County S&WCD
• Donald Bowen, Cayuga County Health
• Jim Hanson, Tompkins County
and Human Services Department
Planning Department
• Kathy Bertuch, CNYRP&DB
• Janet Hawkes, Cayuga Nature CenterJohn Helgren, Cortland County Health Department, Division of Environmental Health
Gene Holcutt, CLWN
Tee-Ann Hunter, Education, Public Participation & Outreach Committee
Art Jacobson, Bureau of Wildlife, NYSDEC – Wildlife Resources Center
Betsy Landre, Finger Lakes Association
Michael Medovich, STERP&DB
Jim Skaley, Education, Public Participation & Outreach Committee
Linda Szeliga, USDA-NRCS
Jane C. Thapa, P.E, NYSDOH
Dan Winch, Tompkins County WRC
Cal Wysokowski, Tompkins County Area Development
Sara Young, Cayuga County Planning DepartmentCayuga Lake Watershed
Restoration and Protection Plan
• Series of meetings
– Both ends of the watershed
• Diverse watershed
– Northern end – farming; gaming
– Southern end – urban; LSC
• Issues of trust
•funding