Psychiatric-neurologic examination methods, with special reference to the significance of signs and symptoms;
188 Pages
English

Psychiatric-neurologic examination methods, with special reference to the significance of signs and symptoms;

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&) memory experiences (Ques- tions as to certain elemen-13, 15, 23-26) ; (c) important disturbances fallacious hallucina-tary (mood, fear, ideas, tions as to his realization(7-12) ; i.e.,(d) of being ill, whether he has disease Facts fur-insight (5-6). may thermore often be ascertained with toregard thought inhibition or of blank-flight ideas, thought confusion, ness of confabulation,thought, perverted understanding, etc. examination of the different sidesThe more thorough theseto functions of consciousness must stresslay upon which clinical as a whole showtheaspects picture may to be of special importance. II. COURSE OF IDEAS (IDEA ASSOCIATIONS) or ideas which have beenSensory impressions present in consciousness at the same time or one after the other will show a to to form as-frequently tendency combine, insociations so that when one of these turnsagain up consciousness it will arouse the others. Of all the pos- sible associations of a smallideas, parthowever, only will assert itself in normal such as thoseconsciousness; external connections,frequently experienced having those and those related ration-practiced again again, or to Theally according significance (i.e., logically). and ideas which are se-experienced duringimpressions vere emotional excitement show a tospecial tendency association or in These often re-preservation memory. veal a close tie between essential and unessential elements Sucli com-(unimportant persons, words, etc.).

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&<LJ-PSYCHIATRIC NEUROLOGIC
EXAMINATION METHODSPSYCHIATRIC-NEUROLOGIC
EXAMINATION METHODS
WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE SIGNIFICANCE
OF SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
BY
DR. AUGUST WIMMER
DENMARK.DIRECTOR ST. HANS NEARHOSPITAL, ROSKILDE, COPENHAGEN,
AUTHOEIZED TRANSLATION BY
ANDREW W. M.D.HOISHOLT,
MEDICAL NAPA STATE PROFESSOR OFSUPERINTENDENT, HOSPITAL;
LELAND STANFORD JUNIORMEDICALPSYCHIATRY, DEPARTMENT,
CALIFORNIASANUNIVERSITY, FRANCISCO,
ST. LOUIS
COMPANYC. V. MOSBY
1919BY C. V.COPYRIGHT, 1919, MOSBY COMPANY
Press of
C. V. Mosby Company
St. LouisPREFACE
introduction to his Doctor Wim-In the compendium
a inmer states that it is meant to be makingguide
examinations for the use of stu-psychiatric-neurologic
indents and physicians general.
he must of include aSuch a partguide, says, necessity
toof the belonging psycho-general 'symptomatology
and he trusts that he has neitherneuropathology,
nor himself in unim-omitted essential lostanything
He has in several madeportant practical points. places
a short of the normal psycho-introductory presentation
or data with the oflogic anatomophysiologic hope giv-
a better of the diseased disturbances.ing understanding
work does not claim to beDoctor Wimmer says, "My
a real treatise on In order to make a cor-'diagnostics.'
elsewhere in it is nec-rect asdiagnosis here, medicine,
to be with the andessary acquainted special pathology
be in of clinical anto possession experience. However,
examination carried out is in itselfmethodologically
ofa in the direction of the Thequite step goal. subject
simulation has been omitted.deliberately Compendious
'
references to tricks' can but do mischief inunmasking
'
the hands of a 'nonspecialist.'
I the book will be found useful to the Americanhope
student in connection hisin withpsychiatry, especially
work in the mental clinics. The time to this branchgiven
of medicine is as so limited that abbreviated out-yet
lines of a examination references tothorough giving
fundamental features in should be wel-symptomatology
come to those aseeking practical guide.
ANDREW W. HOIS'HQLT.
San Cal.Francisco,
5