Self-organized cyclic patterns in muscles and microscopic swimming [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Stefan Günther
143 Pages
English

Self-organized cyclic patterns in muscles and microscopic swimming [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Stefan Günther

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

Self-organized cyclic patterns in musclesand microscopic swimmingStefan GüntherSelf-organized cyclic patternsin musclesand microscopic swimmingDissertationzur Erlangung des Grades des Doktors der Naturwissenschaftender Naturwissenschaftlich-Technischen Fakultät II– Physik und Mechatronik –der Universität des Saarlandesvorgelegt vonStefan GüntherSaarbrücken, 2009Tag des Kolloquiums19. November 2009Dekan der Fakultät Physik und MechatronikUniv.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Christoph BecherMitglieder des PrüfungsausschussesUniv.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Albrecht Ott (Vorsitzender)Univ.-Prof. Dr.phil.nat. Dr.rer.nat. Karsten KruseUniv.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Heiko RiegerPriv.-Doz. Dr.rer.nat. Patrick HuberAbstractLiving cells are self-sustained units of organisms. Within cellsthe complex interplay of a high amount of proteins and othermolecules relies on information that is encoded in the dna. Theself-organisation of cellular constituents might play an importantrole in cellular activity. There is evidence for self-organization in thecytoskeleton of cells where small numbers of interacting proteinscreate patterns of a higher order. The cytoskeleton of muscles hasbeen shown to exhibit cyclic behaviour and wave patterns in absenceof regulatory mechanisms. This thesis provides evidence that theexperimental results can be accounted for by the self-organizationof cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins. A microscopic modelexposes that the dynamics is excitable.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2009
Reads 9
Language English
Document size 32 MB

Exrait

Self-organized cyclic patterns in muscles
and microscopic swimming
Stefan GüntherSelf-organized cyclic patterns
in muscles
and microscopic swimming
Dissertation
zur Erlangung des Grades des Doktors der Naturwissenschaften
der Naturwissenschaftlich-Technischen Fakultät II
– Physik und Mechatronik –
der Universität des Saarlandes
vorgelegt von
Stefan Günther
Saarbrücken, 2009Tag des Kolloquiums
19. November 2009
Dekan der Fakultät Physik und Mechatronik
Univ.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Christoph Becher
Mitglieder des Prüfungsausschusses
Univ.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Albrecht Ott (Vorsitzender)
Univ.-Prof. Dr.phil.nat. Dr.rer.nat. Karsten Kruse
Univ.-Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Heiko Rieger
Priv.-Doz. Dr.rer.nat. Patrick HuberAbstract
Living cells are self-sustained units of organisms. Within cells
the complex interplay of a high amount of proteins and other
molecules relies on information that is encoded in the dna. The
self-organisation of cellular constituents might play an important
role in cellular activity. There is evidence for self-organization in the
cytoskeleton of cells where small numbers of interacting proteins
create patterns of a higher order. The cytoskeleton of muscles has
been shown to exhibit cyclic behaviour and wave patterns in absence
of regulatory mechanisms. This thesis provides evidence that the
experimental results can be accounted for by the self-organization
of cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins. A microscopic model
exposes that the dynamics is excitable. Continuous descriptions of
muscles reveal a non-hydrodynamic mode that accounts for wave
generation. The phenomenological coefficients can directly be re-
lated to microscopic parameters. For this study, the principles that
underly spontaneous muscle oscillations are used in a conceptual
design of a simple self-driven swimmer at low Reynolds number.
The swimmer’s motion can self-organize into directed movement by
dynamically breaking the swimmer’s symmetries.Kurzfassung
Lebende Zellen sind selbständige Untereinheiten von Organismen.
Innerhalb von Zellen beruht das komplexe Wechselspiel einer großen
Menge verschiedener Proteinarten und anderern Moleküle auf In-
formationen die in der DNA kodiert sind. Dabei könnte die Selbst-
organisation der Bestandteile von Zellen eine wichtige Rolle in der
zellulären Aktivität spielen. Es gibt Hinweise auf selbstorganisierte
Prozesse im Zytoskelett von Zellen wobei wenige verschiedenartige
Proteine miteinander wechselwirken und Ordnungsstrukturen erzeu-
gen. Im Zytoskelett von Muskeln werden oszillatorische Aktivitäten
und Wellenmuster beobachtet, ohne regulatorische Mechanismen.
Diese Arbeit findet Hinweise, dass die Selbstorganisation von Fila-
menten und Motorproteinen des Zytoskeletts die experimentellen
Ergebnisse erklären kann. Ein mikroskopisches Model zeigt zudem
die Anregbarkeit der Dynamik. In Beschreibungen von Muskeln als
kontinuierliches Medium kann eine nicht hydrodynamische Mode
identifiziert werden, die für die Wellenphänomene von essentieller
Bedeutung ist. Dabei können phänomenologische Koeffizienten mi-
kroskopischen Parametern zugeordnet werden. Die Prinzipien, die
zu spontanen Muskeloszillationen führen, werden in einer Konzept-
studie eines einfachen Schwimmers bei kleinen Reynolds-Zahlen
genutzt. Die Bewegung des Schwimmers kann sich von selbst in
einen Zustand gerichteter Bewegung organisieren indem sie die
Symmetrien des Schwimmers dynamisch bricht.Preface
This thesis was produced at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex
Systems in Dresden and at the Saarland University in Saarbrücken. My scientific
way was accompanied by the Biological Physics groups in Dresden and in
Saarbrücken and I am grateful for the possibility I was given to be part of both
groups. In particular I want to thank my advisor Prof. Dr. Dr. Karsten Kruse
for scientific and personal accompany during that last years.
I want express my deepest gratitude to J. Müller and F. Börrnert for who
they are. My thanks also goes to P. Born and M. K. Augustin for carefully
reading the manuscripts.
Saarbrücken, 21. Juli 2009 S. G.
vPreface
viContents
1 Introduction 1
2 What is life? 3
3 Self-organized filament–motor assemblies 7
3.1 The cytoskeleton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.1.1 Filaments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.1.2 Molecular motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.1.3 Motor descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.1.4 Self-organized cytoskeletal structures in vitro . . . . . . . . 10
3.2 Muscles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.3 Spontaneous muscle oscillations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3.3.1 Cyclic contractions and waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3.3.2 Available models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4 Phenomenological description of muscle fibres 23
4.1 Active polar gels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4.2 Hydrodynamic theory of muscle fibrils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
5 Microscopic description 31
5.1 Simple homogeneous chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
5.2 Half-sarcomeres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
5.2.1 Collective motor force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
5.2.2 Ensemble average . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
5.2.3 Spontaneous oscillations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
5.2.4 Stochastic simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.2.5 Stretch activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
5.2.6 Shortening deactivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
5.3 Chains of half-sarcomeres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
5.3.1 Single sare element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
5.3.2 Short chains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
5.4 Continuum limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
viiContents
6 Advanced nonlinear dynamics 57
6.1 Half-sarcomeres reloaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
6.1.1 Canard phenomenon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
6.1.2 Generic canard phenomenon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
6.1.3 Global bifurcations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
6.2 Sarcomeres reloaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
6.2.1 Mode interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.2.2 Pulse-coupled oscillators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
6.2.3 Gluing-like bifurcations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
6.2.4 Period doubling and chaotic behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . 76
6.2.5 Generalized canard phenomenon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
6.3 Chain of half-sarcomeres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
7 Self-organized microscopic swimmer 79
7.1 Low Reynolds number swimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
7.2 Swimming strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
7.3 Hydrodynamic interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
7.4 Geometry of locomotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
7.5 Simple swimmer driven by molecular motors . . . . . . . . . . . 86
8 Conclusions and perspectives 91
A Parameter 95
A.1 Parameter set I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
A.2 set II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
B Half-sarcomere element 97
B.1 Fokker-Planck dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
B.2 Reduced equations of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
B.3 Oscillatory instability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
B.4 Critical frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
B.5 Stochastic simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
C Chain of elements 101
C.1 Simple homogeneous chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
C.2 Reduced equations of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
C.3 Stationary states of a chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
C.4 Continuum limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
C.5 Stochastic simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
D Swimmer displacement 107
viii