Nanocatalysis

Nanocatalysis

-

English

Description

Nanocatalysis is one of the most exciting subfields to have emerged from nanoscience. Its central aim is the control of chemical reactions by changing the size, dimensionality, chemical composition and morphology of the reaction center and by changing the kinetics using nanopatterning of the reaction centers. This approach opens up new avenues for atom-by-atom design of nanocatalysts with distinct and tunable chemical activity, specificity, and selectivity. This book is intended to give a pedagogical and methodological overview of this exciting and growing field and to highlight specific examples of current research. In this way, it serves both as an instructive introduction for graduate students who plan to enter the field and as a reference work for scientists already active in this and related areas.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 10 January 2007
Reads 8
EAN13 9783540326465
License: All rights reserved
Language English
Report a problem
Contents
List of Contributors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 Chemical and Catalytic Properties of SizeSelected Free and Supported Clusters T.M. Bernhardt, U. Heiz, and U. Landman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Experimental Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1 Cluster Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2.2 Mass-Selection and Soft-Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Gas-Phase Analysis Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Surface Analysis Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 1.3 Computational Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 1.3.1 Electronic Structure Calculations Via Density Functional Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 1.3.2 Computational Methods and Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 1.4 Concepts for Understanding Chemical Reactions and Catalytic Properties of Finite Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 1.4.1 Basic Mechanisms of Catalytic Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 1.4.2 Cluster-Specific Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 1.5 Specific Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 1.5.1 Chemical Reactions on Point Defects of Oxide Surfaces . . . . 101 1.5.2 The Oxidation of CO on Small Gold Clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 1.5.3 The Oxidation of CO on Small Platinum and Palladium Clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 1.5.4 The Reduction of NO by CO on Pd Clusters: Cooler Cluster Catalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 1.5.5 The Polymerization of Acetylene on Pd Clusters . . . . . . . . . . . 165 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
2 Theory of Metal Clusters on the MgO Surface: The Role of Point Defects G. Pacchioni. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
X
Contents
2.1.1 Oxide Surfaces: Single Crystals, Powders, Thin Films . . . . . . . 194 2.1.2 Metal Particles on Oxides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 2.1.3 The Role of Defects in Nucleation and Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Theoretical Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 2.2.1 Periodic Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 2.2.2 Local Cluster Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 2.2.3 Embedding Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 2.2.4 Electronic Structure Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 2.2.5 Density Functional Theory Versus Wave Function Methods: Cu on MgO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Defects on MgO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 2.3.1 Low-Coordinated Cations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 2.3.2 Low-Coordinated Anions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 2.3.3 Hydroxyl Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 2.3.4 Anion Vacancies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 2.3.5 Cation Vacancies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 2.3.6 Divacancies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 2.3.7 Impurity Atoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 2.3.8 O Radical Anions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 2.3.9 M Centers (Anion Vacancy Aggregates) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 2.3.10 Shallow Electron Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 +2.3.11 (M )(e ) Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 2.3.12 (111) Microfacets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Metal Deposition on MgO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 2.4.1 Transition Metal Atoms on MgO(001) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 2.4.2 Small Metal Clusters on MgO(001) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 2.4.3 Metal Atoms on MgO: Where Are They? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Reactivity of Supported Metal Atoms: The Role of Defects . . . . . . . . 233 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6
3 Catalysis by Nanoparticles C.R. Henry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 3.2 Specific Physical Properties of Free and Supported Nanoparticles . . 249 3.2.1 Surface Energy and Surface Stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 3.2.2 Lattice Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 3.2.3 Equilibrium Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 3.2.4 Melting Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 3.2.5 Electronic Band Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 3.3 Reactivity of Supported Metal Nanoparticles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 3.3.1 Support Effect: Reverse-spillover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 3.3.2 Morphology Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 3.3.3 Effect of the Edges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 3.3.4 The Peculiar Case of Gold Nanoparticles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Contents
XI
3.4 Conclusions and Future Prospects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
4 Lithographic Techniques in Nanocatalysis L.Österlund,A.W.Grant,andB.Kasemo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269 4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 4.2 Methods to Make Model Nanocatalysts: A Brief Overview . . . . . . . . . 275 4.2.1 Lithographic Techniques: An Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 4.2.2 The Surface Science Approach: In Situ Vapor Deposition Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 4.2.3 Spin Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 4.2.4 Self-Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 4.3 Fabrication of Supported Model Catalysts by Lithography . . . . . . . . 278 4.3.1 Electron-Beam Lithography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 4.3.2 Colloidal Lithography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 4.4 Microfabrication of TEM MembraneWindows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 4.4.1 Preparation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 4.4.2 Chemical and Structural Characterization of TEM Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 4.4.3 Nanofabrication of Model Catalysts on TEM Windows . . . . . 311 4.5 Experimental Case Studies with Nanofabricated Model Catalysts: Catalytic Reactions and Reaction-Induced Restructuring . . . . . . . . . . 314 4.5.1 Model Catalysts Fabricated by Electron-Beam Lithography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 4.5.2 Catalytic Reaction Studies with Model Catalysts Made by Colloidal Lithography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 4.6 Summary and Future Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
5 Nanometer and Subnanometer Thin Oxide Films at Surfaces of Late Transition Metals K. Reuter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .343 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 5.2 Initial Oxidation of Transition-Metal Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345 5.2.1 Formation of Adlayers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345 5.2.2 Oxygen Accommodation Below the Top Metal Layer . . . . . . . 348 5.2.3 Oxygen Accumulation in the Surface Region and Surface Oxide Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 5.2.4 Formation of the Bulk Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 5.3 Implications for Oxidation Catalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 5.3.1 The Role of the Gas Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 5.3.2 Stability of Surface Oxides in an Oxygen Environment . . . . . . 358 5.3.3 Constrained Equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 5.3.4 Kinetically Limited Film Thickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 5.3.5 Surface Oxidation and Sabatier Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
XII
Contents
5.4 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5
6 Catalytic Applications for Gold Nanotechnology Sónia A.C. Carabineiro and David T. Thompson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .377 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Preparative Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 6.2.1 Naked Gold, Including Gold Single Crystals and Colloidal Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 6.2.2 Co-Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 6.2.3 Deposition Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 6.2.4 Impregnation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 6.2.5 Vapour-Phase Methods and Grafting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 6.2.6 Ion-Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 6.2.7 Sol–Gel Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 6.2.8 Gold Alloy Catalysts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Properties of Nanoparticulate Gold Catalysts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 6.3.1 Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 6.3.2 Selectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 6.3.3 Durability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 6.3.4 Poison Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Reactions Catalysed by Nanocatalytic Gold and Gold Alloys . . . . . . 394 6.4.1 Water-Gas Shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 6.4.2 Vinyl Acetate Synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 6.4.3 Hydrochlorination of Ethyne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 6.4.4 Carbon Monoxide Oxidation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 6.4.5 Selective Oxidation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 6.4.6 Selective Hydrogenation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 6.4.7 Hydrogen Peroxide Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 6.4.8 Reduction of NOxwith Propene, Carbon Monoxide or Hydrogen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 6.4.9 Oxidative Decomposition of Dioxins and VOCs . . . . . . . . . . . . 441 6.4.10 Catalytic Combustion of Hydrocarbons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444 6.4.11 Ozone Decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446 6.4.12 SO2Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 6.4.13 Heck Reaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449 6.4.14 CO2Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450 6.4.15 Other Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452 Potential Commercial Applications for Gold Nanocatalysts . . . . . . . . 457 6.5.1 Vinyl Acetate Synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457 6.5.2 Methyl Glycolate Synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 6.5.3 Vinyl Chloride Synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 6.5.4 Gluconic Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 6.5.5 Hydrogen Peroxide Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459 6.5.6 Air Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Contents
XIII
6.5.7 Autocatalysts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460 6.5.8 Fuel Cell Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 6.5.9 Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 6.6 Future Prospects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491
http://www.springer.com/978-3-540-74551-8