The life of a sailor
330 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

The life of a sailor

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
330 Pages
English

Description

' -I' ,* , .vJ- ,» ."J v' 1 'ere.le peuple sans SiECLE DE Louis XIV. On entering the city, so eagerly sought, and so pleasant behold, I was struck withto astonish- filthyment at the dirty, state of the suburbs, and the ragged, squalid appearance of the inhabitants. But soon this changed, and we came into the Plaza : here was all magnificence, all beauty ; and here were concentrated the wealth, the govern- ment, the antiquities, the rehgion of the Mexi- Oncans. the eastern side stands the Cathedral THE LIFE OF A SAILOR. 71 the Portal de las Flores onon the north, ; the Government-house or Palace.southern is the On Parian thisthe west is a place called the : latter is the only part which would bear improvement, the houses being very low, and the resort of all the huxters and clothes-venders in the capital. The cathedral is beautifully placed, the architecture perfect, and the structure not like our modern lath-and-plaster buildings, but apparently built to last long as the world exists.as The palace of the Duke de Monte Leone, exiled after the revo- lution, stands on the spot formerly occupied by the palace ofMontezuma and the; government- house, or the palace of the president, which is on the southern side facingtheDuke ofMonte Leone's former abode, was esteemed by a very old tra- veller of royalto be more a residence, than any :palace in Europe —to this I do not subscribe.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Reads 27
Language English
Document size 13 MB

Exrait

'
-I' ,* , .vJ- ,» ."J v' 1
'<v\ C
isiiSi
;'::}', ,1R^
4'
'•"•.'.-:g2M:<<MV.';'-THELIBRARY OF
UNIVERSITYOF ILLINOIS
URBANA-CHAMPAIGNAT
823
C356^
1832
V.3NOTICE: Return or renew all Library Materials! The Minimum Fee for
each Lost Book is $50.00.
The person charging this material is responsible for
its return to the library from which it was withdrawn
on or before the Latest Date stamped below.
Theft, mutilation, and underiining of books are reasons for discipli-
nary action and may result in dismissal from the University.
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
198<iAPR 2
MAR 2111i89
L161—O-1096THE
LIFE OF A SAILOR.
BY
A CAPTAIN IN THE NAVY.
billows foam-Far as the breeze can bear, the
our home !Survey our empire, and behold
Byron.
3LOOMSBURV ,J
IN THREE VOLUMES.
VOL. III.
LONDON:
STREETRICHARD BENTLEY, NEW BURLINGTON
(late COLBURN and BENTLEY.)
1832.rniNTED BY A. J. VALPY, RED LION COURT, FLtET STREET.—
3V.
THE
LIFE OF A SAILOR.
CHAPTER I.
Hark ! 'twas groan—and such as sickness sends,%
Borae on the blast of madness, and of fever.
Ah ! where are now the many once-styled friends'?
Are they at hand, some comfort to deliver ?
O'er the sick couch some sooty negress bends^
And she must close those eyes in death for ever
Those eyes a slave, a foreigner shall close,
iV.nd bear the body to its last repose.
Anonymous.
'^ Once more upon the waters yes, once more.";
The sloop was soon ready for sea ; the guns,
on board the watchstores, provisions, ; bill, quar-
thing butter bill, and every my tailor's bill
arranged; top-gallant yards across; the ship in
VOL. III. Aa
Z LIFE OF SAILOR.THE A
;the Sound, and expectation alive—but previous
to this consummation, so devoutly to be w^ished
by all first-lieutenants, 1 had obtained a few days'
and repaired to Brighton, at which placeleave,
parents were passing the winter. My leavemy
mention itand my visit were short, and I only
here because it was the last time I ever saw my
mother. There was a gloom of anticipation on
her mind, that we never should meet again—
visible melancholy, which never had occurred be-
indeed, often had wefore at our parting ; so
parted, and so often had we met again, that we
^*became accustomed to the good-bye,'* perfectly
it would, at another period, be repeatedcertain ;
time we both felt more than usually dis-but this
tressed. The West Indies is known not to be a
particularly healthy station; and those who are
the sixtieth year of life can seldom calcu-passed
outliving three years, which period Ilate upon
back withto be absent. I looked a melan-was
satisfaction at our parting ; warmly andcholy
byaffectionately was I embraced the best of pa-
the truest of friends. In manhood as Irents, and
the tear, which, burstingI could not refrainwas,