The reformation in France from the revocation of the Edict of Nantes to the incorporation of the reformed churches into the state
198 Pages
English
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The reformation in France from the revocation of the Edict of Nantes to the incorporation of the reformed churches into the state

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198 Pages
English

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'ii>ipw'*¥ >»«*»>* The Reformation IN France II. Heath.Richard LIBRARY OF THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY PRINCETON, N. J. BR 370 .H43 T888 Heath, Richard The reformation in France PIERRE JURIEU. Of PH,^^^kM v^' ^ J'-'I^t Cbwrtlr 2 ] )927IbtoriT >Scries [ .-^ Ill THE REFORMATION IN FRANCE tin ^IcbotationJfrom of tbc (Ebict of lluntes to tin |ncorpor;itiou of tbc ^Icformcb Cburcbcs into tbc State BY V EICHAED HEATH AnUxor 'The Re/onaitionof in France, from the Dawti to theof Reform Revocation the Edict Nantea,'of of etc. WTTII PORTRAITS Eoutian THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY Paternoster Row; St. Paul's Churchvard56, 65, AND 164, Piccadilly 1888 Tanner.BOTLER & Works.PrintingSelwoodThe London.andFrome, ; PREFACE. This history, the earher portion of which was narrated in a previous volume, is here brought to its natural conclusion in the Eevolution of 1789. That that event was the necessary sequel of the Protestant Keformation has long been recognised but for reasons easy to be understood it has not been fully and clearly brought out in histories deal- ing exclusively with the Keformation in France. Hence a certain sadness and perplexity, as if, after all its terrible struggles, after its long martyrdom of two centuries and a half, the Reformation in France failure.

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'ii>ipw'*¥ >»«*»>*
The Reformation
IN France
II.
Heath.RichardLIBRARY OF THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
PRINCETON, N. J.
BR 370 .H43 T888
Heath, Richard
The reformation in FrancePIERRE JURIEU.Of PH,^^^kM
v^' ^
J'-'I^t Cbwrtlr 2 ] )927IbtoriT >Scries [
.-^
Ill
THE REFORMATION
IN FRANCE
tin ^IcbotationJfrom of tbc (Ebict of lluntes
to tin |ncorpor;itiou of tbc ^Icformcb
Cburcbcs into tbc State
BY
V
EICHAED HEATH
AnUxor 'The Re/onaitionof in France, from the Dawti to theof Reform
Revocation the Edict Nantea,'of of etc.
WTTII PORTRAITS
Eoutian
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY
Paternoster Row; St. Paul's Churchvard56, 65,
AND 164, Piccadilly
1888Tanner.BOTLER &
Works.PrintingSelwoodThe
London.andFrome,;
PREFACE.
This history, the earher portion of which was
narrated in a previous volume, is here brought to
its natural conclusion in the Eevolution of 1789.
That that event was the necessary sequel of the
Protestant Keformation has long been recognised
but for reasons easy to be understood it has not
been fully and clearly brought out in histories deal-
ing exclusively with the Keformation in France.
Hence a certain sadness and perplexity, as if, after
all its terrible struggles, after its long martyrdom of
two centuries and a half, the Reformation in France
failure.had proved abortive and a
The Bible teaches us that God regards nations as
life in thisindividual beings, having a continuous
generation being brought intoworld, a particular
(Matt,judgment for the sins of its predecessors
being so, it is impossible toxxiii. 35, 36). This
in Frenchsuppose that the most stupendous event
one of the most im-history and, we may say,—
could haveof Christendom—portant in the history6 PREFACE.
been other than long-the natural sequence of the
resisted movement for Eeform. That movement
Vi^as not confined to the ecclesiastical sphere alone,
but extended to all that constituted the life of the
nation. Against it all in-the vested interests of
justice and falsehood combined but when at last;
they appeared to have triumphed, the movement
towards truth and justice broke out afresh, and
proved at last a national effort. in theBut, just as
case of an individual man for long yearswho has
resisted the cry of his conscience, the awakening
proved most terrible, reason itself for a moment
seeming to reel.
Seen in this light, the History of the Keformation
in France is lifted out of isolation and perplexity
into the great unity of universal filling thehistory,
mind with light, joy, and hope, because it proves a
kind of first-fruits of the ultimate triumph of right-
eousness, of the final reign on earth of justice and
truth.
K. H.