256 Pages
English
Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more

The spatial distribution and interregional dynamics of vegetable production in Thailand [Elektronische Ressource] / von Bernd Hardeweg

-

Gain access to the library to view online
Learn more
256 Pages
English

Description

   The spatial distribution and interregional dynamics of vegetable production in Thailand   Von der Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades   Doktor der Wirtschaftswissenschaften ‐ Doctor rerum politicarum ‐     genehmigte Dissertation   von     Dipl.‐Ing. agr. Bernd Hardeweg geboren am 14.10.1971 in Bocholt     2008                     Referent: Prof. Dr. Hermann Waibel  Institut für Entwicklungs‐ und Agrarökonomik Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät Leibniz Universität Hannover   Korreferent: Prof. Dr. Javier Revilla Diez Institut für Wirtschafts‐ und Kulturgeographie Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät Leibniz Universität Hannover    Tag der Promotion: 8. Dezember 2008                                            “The total vegetables, produced over the infinite plain, would be in‐finite; but after transport cost, only a finite amount will get through to any inner radius“  Paul A. Samuelson (1983, p. 1480) using a highly stylized counter‐example to refute the general supposition that goods with high transport rates are always produced close to the centre of demand and vice versa.    i  ii  Acknowledgements A number of people have to be mentioned here for their support at various stages of the study. First of all, I express my sincere gratitude to my supervisor, Prof.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2008
Reads 16
Language English
Document size 30 MB

Exrait

 
 
 
The spatial distribution and 
interregional dynamics of 
vegetable production in Thailand 
 
 
Von der Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der 
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover 
zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades 
 
 
Doktor der Wirtschaftswissenschaften 
‐ Doctor rerum politicarum ‐ 
 
 
 
 
genehmigte Dissertation 
 
 
von 
 
 
 
 
Dipl.‐Ing. agr. Bernd Hardeweg 
geboren am 14.10.1971 in Bocholt 
 
 
 
 
2008 
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Referent: Prof. Dr. Hermann Waibel  
Institut für Entwicklungs‐ und Agrarökonomik 
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät 
Leibniz Universität Hannover  
 
Korreferent: Prof. Dr. Javier Revilla Diez 
Institut für Wirtschafts‐ und Kulturgeographie 
Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät 
Leibniz Universität Hannover  
 
 
Tag der Promotion: 8. Dezember 2008 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“The total vegetables, produced over the infinite plain, would be in‐
finite; but after transport cost, only a finite amount will get through 
to any inner radius“ 
 
Paul A. Samuelson (1983, p. 1480) using a highly stylized counter‐
example to refute the general supposition that goods with high 
transport rates are always produced close to the centre of demand 
and vice versa. 
   i  
ii  
Acknowledgements 
A number of people have to be mentioned here for their support at various stages of the study. 
First of all, I express my sincere gratitude to my supervisor, Prof. Dr. Hermann Waibel, who has 
attracted my interest for the topic and continuously supported the work throughout the gesta‐
tion of this thesis. His guiding advice and constructive cricitism have been invaluable. I also 
thank Prof. Dr. Javier Revilla Diez for his readiness to act as a second referee.  
During the data collection in Thailand, I had to rely on the help of many persons, who have 
been extremely supportive and patient. First of all I thank all farmers who were ready to share 
their knowledge about vegetable production in field interviews and expert workshops in spite of 
high opportunity cost of their time. The collection of secondary data was a very instructive ex‐
perience and I am grateful to a number of people for providing the required data sets for this 
study. Out of these I want to mention Khun Phitsamai Satayaviboon, Khun Patcharin Nakapraw‐
ing, Khun Orasa Dissataporn of the DoAE and Khun Rajana Netsaengtip of the NSO.   
For much of the fieldwork, I could rely on the support and dedication of Khun Lakchai and 
Khun Patcharee Meenakanit and their staff from the Institute of Biological Agriculture and 
Farmer Field Schools of the DoAE. Through many field visits and discussions they not only pro‐
vided opportunities to learn about Thai agriculture but also introduced me to many aspects of 
Thai culture. Their help has been invaluable in organising and conducting the expert workshops. 
I was lucky to have Khun Tattanakorn Moekchantuek as an experienced facilitator for conduct‐
ing the expert workshops.  
My work in Thailand was supervised by Ajarn Dr. Suwanna Praneetvatakul and Ajarn Som‐
porn Isvilanonda at Kasetsart University, whose advice was instrumental and opened doors to 
institutions and data sources, which otherwise would have remained closed. I am furthermore 
indebted to my dear colleague Dr. Chuthaporn Vanit‐Anunchai for an excellent collaboration 
during the fieldwork, her care and friendship. Together with the staff at the CAER made my stay 
in Thailand a very pleasant one. 
Finally, I would like to thank all my colleagues and especially the Thai expat community at the 
Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics for the warm working atmosphere and my 
family, who often had to stand back, for their understanding and support. 
 
 
 
Funding of this research by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft is gratefully acknowledged. 
   iii  
Table of Contents 
Acknowledgements  iii
Table of Contents  iv
I. Zusammenfassung  vi
II. Abstract  ix
III. Tables  xi
IV. Figures  xiii
V. Abbreviations  xv
1 Introduction  1
2 Economic theory for analysing vegetable supply in Thailand  3
2.1 AGRICULTURE IN A RAPIDLY GROWING ECONOMY  3
2.2 LOCATION THEORIES  7
2.2.1 Theories on the spatial structure of the economy  8
2.2.2 A partial model of the location of agriculture  8
2.2.3 Total models of the von Thünen type  15
2.3 THEORIES ON THE SPATIAL MOBILITY OF GOODS  17
2.4 COMPUTABLE MODELS OF REGIONAL SUPPLY AND DEMAND EQUILIBRIUM  20
2.5 REVIEW OF AGRICULTURAL SECTOR MODELS AND APPLICATIONS IN THAILAND  22
3 Factors influencing supply and demand  27
3.1 DEVELOPMENT TRENDS OF AGRICULTURE  27
3.2 TRENDS IN VEGETABLE PRODUCTION  31
3.2.1 Characteristics  31
3.2.2 Spatial structure of vegetable production  34
3.2.3 Trend analysis  37
3.3 CHARACTERISTICS OF PRODUCTION SYSTEMS  40
3.3.1 Resource use  40
3.3.2 Farming systems  48
3.3.3 Farm structure  52
3.3.4 Alternative production systems  54
3.4 VEGETABLE DEMAND  57
3.4.1 Domestic demand  57
3.4.2 Export and import  60
3.5 TRANSPORT AND MARKETING  61
3.6 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM  64
3.7 SUMMARY  66
4 Conceptual Framework  67
4.1 CHOICE OF MODELLING APPROACH  67
4.2 A REGIONAL PROGRAMMING MODEL OF VEGETABLE SUPPLY IN THAILAND (TVSM)  70
4.2.1 Definition of model boundaries  70
4.2.2 Mathematical structure of the model  71
4.2.3 Model calibration  74
4.2.4 Model regions and transport distance  81
4.2.5 Environmental indicators  84
iv  
4.2.6 Data collection  85
4.3 PRIMARY DATA COLLECTION AND RESULTS  90
4.3.1 Indicative survey  90
4.3.2 Using expert workshops for typical farm definition and parameter elicitation  92
4.3.3 Crop budgets  99
4.4 EXOGENOUS VARIABLES AND POLICY INSTRUMENTS FOR ANALYSIS  102
4.4.1 Demand side factors  102
4.4.2 Increasing fuel prices and transportation system  105
4.4.3 Reduction target for the environmental impact of pesticide use  106
4.4.4 A likely scenario for 2011  106
4.5 SUMMARY  107
5 Results  109
5.1 BASE SCENARIO OF THE MODEL  109
5.1.1 Regional distribution of vegetable production  109
5.1.2 Land and labour allocation  113
5.1.3 Environmental indicators  117
5.2 EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUS VARIABLES ON SUPPLY RESPONSE  123
5.2.1 Demand factors: Income and population growth  123
5.2.2 Supply side factors  135
5.3 IMPACT OF SELECTED POLICIES ON VEGETABLE PRODUCTION  152
5.3.1 Implementation of a fixed pesticide reduction target  152
5.3.2 Effect of pesticide taxation based on an environmental impact indicator  163
5.3.3 Effects of a zoning policy banning vegetable production from the peri‐urban fringe  166
5.4 A SCENARIO FOR 2011  175
5.4.1 Regional distribution of vegetable production  176
5.4.2 Marginal cost of vegetable supply  178
5.4.3 Utilization of farm land and labour  179
5.4.4 Selected environmental indicators  182
5.4.5 Sub‐regional implications of the forecast 2011 scenario  185
6 Summary and conclusions  192
6.1 SUMMARY  192
6.2 POLICY IMPLICATIONS  197
6.3 FURTHER RESEARCH NEEDS  198
7 References  200
8 Appendix  215

   v  
I. Zusammenfassung 
Verbunden  mit  dem  raschen  Wirtschaftswachstum  in  Thailand  zeigt  auch  der 
Gemüsebausektor eine dynamische Entwicklung. Es ist das Ziel dieser Arbeit, die Faktoren, die 
die Mobilität der Gemüseproduktion und die künftigen Produktionsstandorte im Hinblick auf 
eine  rückläufige  Produktion  in  den  traditionellen  Anbaugebieten  um  die  rasch  wachsende 
Hauptstadt  zu  bestimmen.  Darüber  hinaus  soll  auch  der  Zusammenhang  zwischen  einer 
Verlagerung  der  Produktionsstandorte  und  der  Adoption  umweltfreundlicher  Produktions‐
verfahren ermittelt werden. Schließlich werden auch Möglichkeiten für staatliche Eingriffe mit 
dem Ziel, negative Externalitäten der gegenwärtig dominierenden Technologien zu reduzieren, 
untersucht.  
Der Strukturwandel der thailändischen Volkswirtschaft in Verbindung mit dem schnellen 
Wirtschaftswachstum hat dazu geführt, dass der Anteil der Landwirtschaft am Bruttosozial‐
produkt in den vergangenen 40 Jahren von 80% auf 10% gesunken ist, während noch immer 
etwa 40% der Erwerbstätigen in diesem Sektor beschäftigt sind. Dies hat zu einem beträchtlichen 
Einkommensgefälle zwischen städtischen und ländlichen Einkommen geführt. Zugleich haben 
aber  Urbanisierung  und  steigende  Pro‐Kopf‐Einkommen  zu  einer  höheren  Nachfrage  nach 
hochwertigen Nahrungsmitteln, einschließlich Gemüse geführt. Gemüse hat eine vergleichs‐
weise kurze Kulturdauer und wird mit hoher Intensität von ertragssteigernden Produktions‐
faktoren  wie  Dünge‐  und  Pflanzenschutzmitteln  produziert.  Das  hohe  Einsatzniveau  von 
Pflanzenschutzmitteln und unsichere Handhabung führen dabei zu erheblichen Risiken für die 
Beschäftigten im Gemüsebau und die Konsumenten. Obwohl Gemüse prinzipiell überall in 
Thailand  angebaut  wird,  war  die  Produktion  traditionell  doch  vorwiegend  um  die  Städte, 
insbesondere westlich und nördlich von Bangkok konzentriert. Auch im kühleren Klima der 
höheren Lagen Nordthailands wird ein größerer Anteil des Gemüses produziert. Zwischen den 
späten 1980er Jahren und 2000 ist ein signifikanter rückläufiger Trend bei der Produktion in 
Bangkok und den benachbarten Provinzen feststellbar. Während des gleichen Zeitraums nahm 
der Anteil der Produktion in etwas weiter entfernten Provinzen im Westen und etwa 300 km 
entfernt im Nordosten von Bankok zu. Der ohnehin sehr bedeutende Anteil des Nordens an der 
Gesamtproduktion  hat  sich  dabei  kaum  verändert.  Insgesamt  bedeutet  dies,  dass  sich  der 
Gemüseanbau graduell aus den peri‐urbanen in weiter entfernte rurale Gebiete verlagert. 
Um diese Entwicklungen vor dem Hintergrund der Fragestellung zu analysieren wurde ein 
regionalisiertes  Programmierungsmodell  für  Angebot  und  Nachfrage  entwickelt,  das  die 
wesentlichen Eigenschaften des Sektors abbildet. Es umfasst 23 Gemüsearten und berücksichtigt 
deren Produktion und Nachfrage in acht über Transportaktivitäten verbundenen Regionen und 
deckt damit etwa 90% des Produktionswertes des Gemüsesektors zu loco‐Hof‐Preisen ab. Das 
Modell  minimiert  die  variablen  Kosten  der  Gemüseproduktion  und  –transformation  unter 
vi  
Berücksichtigung regionaler Nachfragemengen. Die Kapazitätsbeschränkungen der regionalen 
Produktion sind aus Daten des Agrarzensus und weiteren Sekundärdaten abgeleitet worden. Die 
Produktionstechnologie wird durch regional definierte Parameter der Produktionsaktivitäten 
abgebildet. Diese Daten wurden im Rahme von Expertenworkshops mit Gemüsebauern und 
Fachleuten der landwirtschaftlichen Offizialberatung erhoben. Das Modell wurde mit Hilfe der 
positiven  mathematischen  Programmierung  auf  die  im  Basisjahr  beobachteten 
Aktivitätsumfänge kalibriert.  
Die Ergebnisse der Modellsimulationen zeigen, dass im Durchschnitt nur 43% der regionalen 
Gemüseproduktion  innerhalb  der  Ursprungsregion  verbraucht  werden.  Bedingt  durch  die 
regional  unterschiedlichen  Produktionsbedingen  wird  Gemüse  über  durchschnittlich  293 
Kilometer transportiert. Damit verursacht der Transport etwa 245.000 Tonnen CO2‐Emissionen 
pro  Jahr.  Weiterhin  zeigen  die  Modellergebnisse,  dass  die  Intensität  des  Pflanzenschutz‐
mitteleinsatzes in Nordthailand bereits das Niveau der traditionellen Anbaugebiete um Bangkok 
erreicht hat und damit etwa 11,8 kg an aktiven Substanzen pro Hektar und Jahr ausgebracht 
werden.  
Die  Auswirkungen  von  Veränderungen  in  verschiedenen  exogenen  Variablen  sind  durch 
parametrische Simulation untersucht worden. Es zeigt sich, dass die regionalen Anteile an der 
Gemüseproduktion  vergleichsweise  stabil  sind.  Sowohl  steigende  Nachfrage,  als  auch 
verbesserte Transporttechnologie und eine Beschränkung des Gemüseanbaus in Bangkok führen 
zu  einer  stärkeren  Verlagerung  von  den  marktnahen  zu  weiter  entfernten  Produktions‐
standorten. Dagegen wirken steigende Energiepreise und eine Pestizidreduktionspolitik darauf 
hin, dass die Produktion auf marktnahen Standorten zunimmt. 
Um eine Aussage über die künftige Entwicklung zu treffen, wurde ein plausibles Szenario für 
das Jahr 2011 definiert, das von steigender Nachfrage, zunehmenden Energiepreisen, steigenden 
Löhnen, abnehmenden Gemüsebauflächen in Bangkok und Umgebung, steigenden Erträgen und 
weiterer Adoption umweltfreundlicher Produktionsverfahren ausgeht. Das Ergebnis für dieses 
Szenario  zeigt,  dass  die  Gemüseproduktion  in  allen  Regionen  etwa  gleichmäßig  zunimmt, 
wohingegen  die  Landnutzung  und  Nachfrage  nach  Arbeitskräften  bedingt  durch  die 
Ertragssteigerungen  sinken.  Die  marginalen  Kosten  des  Gemüseangebots  auf  den  zentralen 
Großmärkten steigen dabei um durchschnittlich etwa 10%, bedingt durch steigende Löhne und 
Transportkosten. Die Intensität des Düngemittel‐ und Pflanzenschutzmitteleinsatz wird dabei 
sogar  zunehmen,  insbesondere  in  Regionen  mit  einem  bereits  hohen  Einsatzniveau.  Eine 
Fortsetzung  der  gegenwärtigen  Entwicklung  führt  demnach  zu  weiter  steigenden  externen 
Kosten der Gemüseproduktion. 
Die  Wirkung  von  drei  ausgewählten  Politikmaßnahmen  mit  dem  Ziel,  diesen  Trend 
umzukehren,  wurde  mit  Hilfe  des  Modells  untersucht.  Die  Ergebnisse  zeigen,  dass  eine 
Politikmaßnahme, die den Anbau von Gemüse in Stadtnähe (um Bangkok) beschränkt, dazu 
führt, dass zwar die absoluten Einsatzmengen in dieser Region sinken, aber die Intensität auf 
den  verbleibenden  Flächen  und  in  anderen  Regionen  steigt.  Die  Festlegung  eines 
   vii  
Pestizidreduktionsziels  ist  mit  gegenwärtig  verfügbarer  Technologie  bis  zu  einem 
Reduktionsziel  von  30%  möglich,  führt  aber  zu  deutlich  höheren  marginalen  Kosten  des 
Gemüseangebots. Eine Pigou‐Steuer auf der Basis der Umweltwirkung einzelner Pestizide zeigt 
sich in den Simulationen als wirksame Maßnahme. Der Anstieg der marginalen Angebotskosten 
ist dabei mäßig und kann durch weitere Adoption umweltfreundlicher Produktionstechniken 
gesenkt werden. 
 
 
Schlagworte: Thailand, Gemüsebau, Agrarsektormodell 
viii