Towards material modelling within continuum-atomistics [Elektronische Ressource] / von Tadesse Abdi
123 Pages
English

Towards material modelling within continuum-atomistics [Elektronische Ressource] / von Tadesse Abdi

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

Towards Material Modelling withinContinuum-Atomisticsvom Fachbereich Maschinenbau und Verfahrenstechnikder Technischen Universität Kaiserslauternzur Verleihung des akademischen GradesDoktor-Ingenieur (Dr.-Ing.)genehmigte DissertationvonM.Sc. Tadesse AbdiHauptreferent: Prof. Dr.-Ing. P. SteinmannKorreferent: JP Dr.-Ing E. KuhlVorsitznder: Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. D. EiflerDekan: Prof. Dr.-Ing. J. C. AurichTag der Einreichung: 28.10.2005Tag der mündl. Prüfung: 26.05.2006Kaiserslautern, Mai 2006D 386AbstractSynopsis: With the burgeoning computing power available, multiscale modelling and simulationhas these days become increasingly capable of capturing the details of physical processes on differ-ent scales. The mechanical behavior of solids is oftentimes the result of interaction between mul-tiple spatial and temporal scales at different levels and hence it is a typical phenomena of interestexhibiting multiscale characteristic. At the most basic level, properties of solids can be attributedto atomic interactions and crystal structure that can be described on nano scale. Mechanical prop-erties at the macro scale are modeled using continuum mechanics for which we mention stressesand strains. Continuum models, however they offer an efficient way of studying material prop-erties they are not accurate enough and lack microstructural information behind the microscopicmechanics that cause the material to behave in a way it does.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 January 2006
Reads 45
Language English
Document size 2 MB

Towards Material Modelling within
Continuum-Atomistics
vom Fachbereich Maschinenbau und Verfahrenstechnik
der Technischen Universität Kaiserslautern
zur Verleihung des akademischen Grades
Doktor-Ingenieur (Dr.-Ing.)
genehmigte Dissertation
von
M.Sc. Tadesse Abdi
Hauptreferent: Prof. Dr.-Ing. P. Steinmann
Korreferent: JP Dr.-Ing E. Kuhl
Vorsitznder: Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. D. Eifler
Dekan: Prof. Dr.-Ing. J. C. Aurich
Tag der Einreichung: 28.10.2005
Tag der mündl. Prüfung: 26.05.2006
Kaiserslautern, Mai 2006
D 386Abstract
Synopsis: With the burgeoning computing power available, multiscale modelling and simulation
has these days become increasingly capable of capturing the details of physical processes on differ-
ent scales. The mechanical behavior of solids is oftentimes the result of interaction between mul-
tiple spatial and temporal scales at different levels and hence it is a typical phenomena of interest
exhibiting multiscale characteristic. At the most basic level, properties of solids can be attributed
to atomic interactions and crystal structure that can be described on nano scale. Mechanical prop-
erties at the macro scale are modeled using continuum mechanics for which we mention stresses
and strains. Continuum models, however they offer an efficient way of studying material prop-
erties they are not accurate enough and lack microstructural information behind the microscopic
mechanics that cause the material to behave in a way it does. Atomistic models are concerned with
phenomenon at the level of lattice thereby allowing investigation of detailed crystalline and defect
structures, and yet the length scales of interest are inevitably far beyond the reach of full atom-
istic computation and is prohibitively expensive. This makes it necessary the need for multiscale
models. The bottom line and a possible avenue to this end is, coupling different length scales, the
continuum and the atomistics in accordance with standard procedures. This is done by recourse to
the Cauchy-Born rule and in so doing, we aim at a model that is efficient and reasonably accurate
in mimicking physical behaviors observed in nature or laboratory.
In this work, we focus on concurrent coupling based on energetic formulations that links the con-
tinuum to atomistics. At the atomic scale, we describe deformation of the solid by the displaced
positions of atoms that make up the solid and at the continuum level deformation of the solid is de-
scribed by the displacement field that minimize the total energy. In the coupled model, continuum-
atomistic, a continuum formulation is retained as the overall framework of the problem and the
atomistic feature is introduced by way of constitutive description, with the Cauchy-Born rule estab-
lishing the point of contact. The entire formulation is made in the framework of nonlinear elasticity
and all the simulations are carried out within the confines of quasistatic settings. The model gives
direct account to measurable features of microstructures developed by crystals through sequential
lamination.
Key words: Cauchy-Born rule, ellipticity, hexagonal lattice, material force, microstructure, mor-
phology, rank-one convexity, relaxation, sequential laminate, stability
iiZusammenfassung
Mit den heute zur Verfügung stehenden Rechenleistungen ist die Multiskalen-Modellierung und
-Berechnung zunehmend in der Lage, detalliert physikalische Prozesse zu simulieren. Das mecha-
nische Verhalten von Festkörpern ist häufig das Ergebnis der Interaktion zwischen vielfachen räum-
lichen und zeitlichen Skalen auf verschiedenen Stufen und demzufolge ein typisches Phänomen
mit Multiskalen-Character. Auf der elementaren Stufe, der Nano-Skala können die Eigenschaften
von Festkörpern anhand der atomistischen Wechselwirkung und ihrer Kristallstruktur beschrieben
werden. Die mechanischen Eigenschaften auf der Makro-Skala werden oftmals mit Hilfe der Kon-
tinuumsmechanik modelliert. Obwohl Kontinuum-Modelle ein effizienter Weg zur Untersuchung
von Materialeigenschaften sind, weisen sie jedoch oftmals eine unzureichende Genauigkeit und
einen Mangel an mikrostrukturellen Informationen über die mikroskopische Mechanik auf. Atom-
istische Modelle andererseits ermöglichen die detallierte Untersuchung der Kristall- und Defekt-
struktur. Dennoch sind die Längenskalen, die von Interesse sind, immer noch weit entfernt von
den Möglichkeiten einer komplett atomistischen Berechnung und machen diese unerschwinglich
teuer. Somit besteht der Bedarf für Multiskalen-Modelle. Die Schlußfolgerung und ein möglicher
Zugang zu diesem Ziel ist die Kopplung verschiedener Längenskalen, der kontinuums- und atom-
istischen Skala, in Übereinstimmung mit Standardverfahren. Mit Zurhilfenahme der Cauchy-Born
Regel zielen wir auf ein Modell ab, welches effizient und genügend genau in der Simulation des in
der Natur oder im Labor betrachteten physikalischen Verhaltens ist.
In dieser Arbeit konzentrieren wir uns auf eine simultane Kopplung der Kontinuums- mit der
atomistischen Formulierung basierend auf energetischen Formulierungen. Auf der atomistischen
Skala beschreiben wir die Deformation des Körpers anhand der (verschobenen) Positionen der
Atome, die diesen Festkörper bilden. Auf der Kontinuumsebene wird die Deformation des Fes-
tkörpers durch den Verschiebungsvektor, der die gesamte freie Energie minimiert, beschrieben.
In dem gekoppelten Kontinuum-atomistischen Modell wird eine Kontinuumsformulierung als all-
gemeiner Rahmen beibehalten. Das atomistische Characteristikum des Modells wird einbezogen
mittels einer konstitutiven Beschreibung, wobei die Cauchy-Born Regel als Schnittstelle dient. Die
gesamte Formulierung wurde im Rahmen nichtlinearer Elastizität gemacht, wobei quasistatische
Zustände angenommen wurden. Das Modell liefert messbare Eigenschaften von Mikrostrukturen,
wie sie bei Kristallen durch sequentielle Lamination entstehen.
iiiSchlüsselwörter: Cauchy-Born Regel, Elliptizität, hexagonales Kristallgitter, Materielle Kraft,
Mikrostruktur, Morphologie, Rang eins Konvexität, Relaxation, sequentielle Lamination, Stabil-
itätAcknowledgment
A complete list of every person that has contributed to my understanding of the subject of this work
is long. The acquaintances I have made, the discussions I have had with the members of Applied
Mechanics have been inspirational and have helped me enormously to have a better insight into
the problems and further develop my ideas. I am grateful for having been given the opportunity
to experience the conducive atmosphere at the Chair of Applied Mechanics, University of Kaiser-
slautern. Best words can not express my sincere gratitude to my supervisor Prof. Steinmann, not
only for introducing me to continuum mechanics but also for his never ending patience, inspiring
advises all the way and above all his relentless support over the years.
Last but not least, it gives me pleasure to thank JP. Kuhl for all her suggestions, reading patiently a
continuous stream of drafts and moreover for several hours of joyful discussions and useful ideas.
vContents
Abstract ii
Acknowledgment v
Notation ix
Introduction 1
1 Motivation 6
1.1 Non-uniqueness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.2 External potential and behavior of minimizers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2 Mixed continuum atomistic constitutive modelling 14
2.1 Atomistic modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.1.1 Description of total energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.1.2 Kinematics and atomic level constitutive law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.1.3 Energy and external load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.2 Continuum modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.2.1 Deformation and motion of hyperelastic continua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.2.2 Measures of deformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.3 Coupling the atomistic core to the surrounding continuum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.3.1 Macroscopic energy and interaction potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.3.2 Elastic constitutive law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.4 Equilibrium equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.4.1 Boundary value problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.4.2 Extremum variational principle for elastic continuum . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.4.3 Localized convexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.5 Numerical investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.5.1 Continuum deformation and crystallite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
vi3 The Cauchy-Born rule and crystal elasticity 39
3.1 Atomic lattice model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.1.1 Energy minimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.1.2 Lattice statics and equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3.2 Discrete minimizers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3.2.1 Asymptotic behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
3.3 Energy decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.3.1 Validity and failure of the Cauchy-Born rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
3.4 Unit cell of hexagonal lattice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.4.1 The Cauchy-Born rule and Lennard Jones potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
3.5 Convex approximation of the potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
3.5.1 Harmonic approximation of the interaction potential . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.6 From unit cell to lattice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3.6.1 Hexagonal lattice and the Cauchy-Born rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3.7 Atomic level stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
3.7.1 The average stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4 Minimum energy state and feature of crystals 61
4.1 Lowest energy configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.1.1 Loss of rank-one convexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4.2 Infinitesimal convexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.2.1 Dead loads and sufficient condition for uniqueness . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.3 Rank-one convexification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.3.1 Approximate rank-one convex envelop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.3.2 Continuum-atomistics and rank-one convexification . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.4 Phase decomposition deformation and oscillation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
5 Material force method coupled with continuum–atomistics 87
5.1 Spatial interaction forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
5.2 Material and spatial motion problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
5.3 The Eshelby stress tensor and material interaction forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
5.4 Material node-point forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.5 Numerical examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
5.5.1 Crack extension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
5.5.2 Morphology of a void . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.5.3 Effect of length scale of interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6 Summary and Conclusions 96
Appendices 98
A Transformation of bases 99B Geometric compatibility 101
C Multi-well structures of W based on Lennard Jones potential 1030
References 105Notation
’ Nonlinear deformation map
F Deformation gradient
W Strain energy density per unit reference volumeo
Q Proper orthogonal tensor
SO(n) Group of proper orthogonal tensors
I Energy functional
f’ g Sequence of admissible deformationsk2Nk
B Reference configuration0
@B boundary0
K Zero set of energy density
B Current configurationt
I Identity tensor
E Cartesian basis vector in the reference configurationi
e basis vector in the currenti
W Strain energy density per unit volumet
X Reference placement
x Current
C Left Cauchy-Green deformation tensor
b Distributed body force field per unit mass
t First Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor
; Parameters of Lennard Jones potential
Cauchy stress tensor
Reference mass density0
Current mass density
t Surface traction
A Space of admissible deformations
extf External load on atomii
dX Material line element
dx Spatial line
dV Reference volume element
dv Current volume
ix k-atom interactionk
intE Total internal energy
E Energy contribution of siteri i
R Reference sitei
r Current sitei

Two dimensional domain
B Finite lattice in reference configuration0
r Lattice constant0
f Net force acting on atomi.i
f Force on atomi due to interaction with atomjij
k Atomic level stiffnessij
totE Total energy
u Displacement of atomii
L Set of all lattice sites
L Set of bulk lattice sites0
n Unit normal vector in the current configuration
N Unit vector in the reference
da Area element in the current configuration
dA Area in the reference
L Tangent operator
nnM Set of orientation preserving tensors of order-n+
U Right stretch tensor
q Acoustic tensor
a Amplitude of deformation jump
G Generation of level-n laminaten
Kronecker deltaij
Q
W Quasiconvex envelop ofW00
RW Rank-one convex envelop of W00
qhK Quasiconvex hull ofK
rhK Rank-one convex hull ofK
Volume fraction
Local volume fractioni
Global volumei
f Spatial interaction forceij
F Material forceij
t two-point stress tensor
t Eshelby stress tensor
J Determinant of deformation gradient