Catalogue IWC Watches 2012-2013
125 Pages
English
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Catalogue IWC Watches 2012-2013

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
125 Pages
English

Description

Le Catalogue IWC Watches présente l'ensemble de la collection 2012-2013 du célèbre horloger de Schaffhausen.
En plus de la présentation des différentes montres IWC, vous trouverez aussi sur ce document en anglais la présentation de la marque et de son histoire.

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Informations

Published by
Published 16 January 2014
Reads 67
Language English
Document size 35 MB

Exrait

C R A F T S M A N S H I P M A D E I N S C H A F F H A U S E N
WATCHES FROM IWC 2012/2013
“ C R A F T S M A N S H I P M A D E I N S C H A F F H A U S E N ”
WATCHES FROM IWC 2012/2013
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T E C H N I C A L D E T A I L S
The “jewels” (of ten referred to as rubies) used in wristwatches are leather), dif ferences in colour and appearance cannot be excluded. not genuine precious stones. Designed to reduce friction as well Natural materials are not suitable for use in and under water. as mechanical wear and tear, they are made of industrial-standard rubies and are used mainly for bearings, levers and detents as The position of tool recesses and engravings on screw-in back well as par ts of the escapement. Generally speaking, the material covers may var y from watch to watch. used for watch jewels today is synthetically manufactured ruby. The reason for this is that it has practically the same physical and * IWC Schaf fhausen is not the owner of the Glucydur®, Nivaflex®chemical proper ties as naturally occurring rubies but is purer and and Super-LumiNova®trademarks. has a more homogeneous cr ystalline structure. ** The Aquatimer bracelet quick-change system was developed by IWC under a patent licence from Car tier. Technical and other specifications may change without notice, and all models and product lines are subject to availabilit y. The infor -mation provided here refers exclusively to the model named or is of a general nature. In view of the high level of manual craf tsman - Annual Edition 2012/13, ef fective from April 2012 ship involved, all the specifications are subject to production tol -erances.
The illustrations in this catalogue may show watches with custom -ized or special features that are available only at additional cost upon request.
Not all the watches in this catalogue are shown in their original sizes. For printing-related reasons, there may be deviations in the colours of the watches illustrated. The stamp shown on the inside of the Santoni leather straps may also dif fer from the original. It should also be noted that, when natural materials are used (e. g.
W A T C H E S F R O M I W C 2 0 1 2 / 2 0 1 3
44
N E W P R O D U C T S
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C O N T E N T S
 4 4 P I LOT ’ S WATC H E S N E W P R O D U C T S :  54 Pilot’s Watch TOP GUN Miramar  56 Pilot’s Watch Chronograph  TOP GUN Miramar  58 Big Pilot’s Watch Perpetual Calendar  TOP GUN  60 Big Pilot’s Watch TOP GUN  62 Pilot’s Watch Chronograph TOP GUN  66 Spitfire Perpetual Calendar  Digital Date-Month  68 Spitfire Chronograph  74 Big Pilot’s Watch  76 Pilot’s Watch Double Chronograph  78 Pilot’s Watch Chronograph  80 Pilot’s Watch Worldtimer  82 Pilot’s Watch Mark XVII  84 Pilot’s Watch Chronograph Edition  Antoine de Saint Exupéry  88 Big Pilot’s Watch for Father and Son  90 Pilot’s Watch Mark XVI for Father and Son
14
T E C H N O L O G Y
 6 E D I TO R I A L  8 T H E CO M PA N Y ’ S F O U N DAT I O N  1 4 T E C H N O LO GY  16 Introduction  18 IWC calibres  26 IWC complications  36 IWC cases  43 Bracelets  
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P R O D U C T S
— 5 —
2 0 1 2 / 2 0 1 3
 9 2 P O R T U G U E S E  N E W P R O D U C T:  118 Portuguese Yacht Club Chronograph Edition  “Volvo Ocean Race 2011–2012”  1 3 2 DA V I N C I  1 5 2 P O R TO F I N O  N E W P R O D U C T: 176 Portofino Chronograph Edition  Laureus Sport for Good Foundation
 1 7 8 AQ UAT I M E R
2 0 0 I N G E N I E U R
216
M A N U F A C T U R E
 2 1 6 M A N U FAC T U R E 218 Introduction 220 Development 222 Tests 224 Assembly 227 Engravings 228 Service 232 IWC training centre 234 Museum 236 Environmental protection 238 Chronology
24 4 AC K N OW L E D G E M E N T S
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W A T C H E S F R O M I W C 2 0 1 2 / 2 0 1 3
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A T I W C , 2 0 1 2 I S A Y E A R
F O R H I G H - F L Y E R S
— W E L C O M E T O 2 0 1 2 , T H E Y E A R O F T H E I W C P I L O T ’ S W A T C H E S —
 Anyone interested in the history of professional pilot’s watches simply cannot ig -nore IWC. The very first IWC Pilot’s Watches of the 1930s and 40s set technical benchmarks, and the dial designs determined the instrument look that has remained current to this day. In 2012, IWC unveils five new TOP GUN models. TOP GUN is the name of a collection that offers the very best that is available in mechanical wristwatches today. And for the first time, IWC rolls out the attractive TOP GUN Miramar line. The dial design references IWC’s long-standing tradition in the manufacture of deck watches. At the same time, Miramar is the name of the small town in California where the myth of the elite pilots was born. For its choice of colours and materials, the cre -ative team took its inspiration from the military-style design suggested by the choice of theme. Look ing even classier, the elegant Spitfire collection with its new features and IWC-manufactured movements will no doubt appeal to many watch lovers. But the watch that takes undisputed pride of place in the Spitfire line is the Spitfire Perpetual Calendar Digital Date-Month. In its big digital date and month dis-
plays, the design engineers have executed a tremen -dous technical and aesthetic tour de force in Haute Horlogerie. This year, the Classics collection – which traditionally takes its design cues from cockpit in -struments – features a triple date display inspired by the shape of an altimeter: only the Big Pilot’s Watch retains its familiar look. Of particular interest to fre -quent flyers is the new Pilot’s Watch Worldtimer. Apart from local time on the dial, its rotating 24-hour ring provides an instantaneous overview of the current time in all 24 time zones. Some very exciting premieres, then, including two perpetual calendar models, the new Miramar line, and a wonderful-looking Spitfire line: in 2012, the year of IWC’s Pilot’s Watches, there is some thing for everyone. We wish you many hours of pleasant and relaxed reading with this Annual Edition. Yours IWC Schaffhausen
W A T C H E S F R O M I W C 2 0 1 2 / 2 0 1 3
THE COMPANYS FOUNDATION
— 1 0 —
A M E R I C A N P I O N E E R I N G S P I R I T
M E E T S S W I S S T R A D I T I O N
The founder of IWC Schaffhausen, Florentine Ariosto Jones
 Roaring masses of water plunge over the rocky cliffs that make up the world-famous Rhine Falls. A few kilometres upstream, in Schaff -hausen, the Rhine glides at a leisurely pace past the workshop windows of IWC. Here, over 140 years ago, a company began a story that is still being writ-ten today. American engineer and watchmaker Florentine Ariosto Jones learnt the watchmaker’s trade from scratch. At the tender age of 27, he was appointed deputy dir ect-or and production manager of the E. Howard Watch & Clock Company in Boston, which was then a lead ing American watchmaker. At that time, the American market appeared to have a virtually insatiable hunger for quality watches and its watch production methods were among the most modern in the world. What it lacked was skilled, qualified local labour and this led to rising wages. By contrast, the conditions prevail-
ing in Switzerland for American watch manu facturers were almost perfect: low wages, a plentiful supply of skilled craftsmen and an enormous production cap-acity. Jones crossed the Atlantic planning to com-bine the excellence of Switzerland’s craftsmen with modern engineering from abroad and a gen erous helping of pioneering spirit in order to make top-quality watches for the American market. The locals inGeneva and the remote valleys of the Jura in French-speaking Switzerland, however, re acted sceptically to his proposal. Since the 17th century, they had been working from their homes or in tiny workshops. Jones, on the other hand, was dreaming of building a modern factory with centralized production. At this time, Schaffhausen at the north-eastern tip of the country could reflect on a long clockmaking trad-ition. The first mechanical clock ever mentioned in the records was made way back in 1409 at the Rheinau
T H E C O M P A N Y ’ S F O U N D A T I O N
— 1 1 —
An example of an F. A. Jones calibre, named after IWC’s founder, approximately 1875
T H E C O M P A N Y ’ S F O U N D A T I O N
— 1 2 —
Various skill and precision instruments are the tools an IWC watchmaker uses as he positions the rotor onto the case
T H E C O M P A N Y ’ S F O U N D A T I O N
— 1 3 —
Monastery, 10 kilometres further down the Rhine. It had been produced for the Church of St. John in Schaffhausen. There are also official records of a clockmakers’ guild in the town from 1583, and it was home to the famed Habrecht family of clockmakers, who built one of history’s most outstanding astro-nomical clocks for Strasbourg Cathedral. Neverthe-less, it was Jones’s plan to manufacture relatively large numbers of high-quality watches in-house to precisely the same tolerances which enabled these watches made in Schaffhausen to become famous all over the world.
In Schaffhausen, Jones found all he needed to turn his plans into reality, including a hydro station pow ered by the Rhine. The electricity it generated was trans-mitted directly, via shafts and long cables, to the newly built factory and supplied the power need ed to drive the machines. The railway line to Schaffhausen had been completed in 1857, so it was no wonder that the town was enjoying an economic boom. For the man from Boston, it was a case of being in pre-cisely the right place at the right time and, in 1868, F. A. Jones founded his watch factory: the Inter na-tional Watch Co. (IWC).
IWC’s historic headquarters with its modern East and West Annexes and the IWC museum
T H E C O M P A N Y ’ S F O U N D A T I O N
T E C H N O L O G Y
— 1 6 —
Original hour and minute discs from the Pallweber watch of 1885. With this model, IWC launched the first pocket watch with a perfectly choreographed jumping digital display
T E C H N O L O G Y
— 1 7 —
T H E Q U E S T F O R T E C H N I C A L
P E R F E C T I O N I S P A R T O F
T H E C O M P A N Y ’ S P H I L O S O P H Y
T R A I L B L A Z I N G T E C H N O L O G Y F R O M S C H A F F H A U S E N
 The development and continu-ous improvement of movements, functional displays and cases has been part of IWC’s philosophy since 1868. Complications such as the perpetual calendar, tourbillon and minute repeater are not only his tor-ically significant achievements in the art of watch -making but also the fruit of the company’s in -house design and development efforts. In order to meet its demanding, self-imposed quality standards, IWC
has its own completely equipped and dedicated laboratory. F R O M T H E F . A . J O N E S C A L I B R E T O T H E P E L L A T O N W I N D I N G S Y S T E M The company’s excellent reputation was establish ed right from the start with the very first F. A. Jones calibre named after the founder of IWC. Its many
outstanding features included a compensating ba l-ance, a Breguet spring and an elongated index to facilitate precision adjustment of the watch’s rate. Towards the end of the 19th century, IWC used its 64-calibre ladies’ pocket watch movement in its first wristwatches. The first real wristwatch movements – the 75 calibre, which had no seconds display, and the 76 calibre with its small seconds – fol lowed in 1915. In 1946, the 89 calibre, the first design to come
from IWC’s Technical Director of the time, Albert Pellaton, made a deep impression with its ex cep-tionally precise rate. Pellaton’s masterpiece – IWC’s first automatic movement featuring the winding sys-tem that still bears his name – appeared in 1950.
T E C H N O L O G Y
S
63
62
S
S
42
51614 9.1 mm 37.8 mm
42
42
Jewels
 5 0 0 0 0 - C A L I B R E FA M I LY
30
Windingb)
S
S
Calibre Height Diameter Frequencya) basic movement
S
28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
59210 5.8 mm 37.8 mm
 8 0 0 0 0 - C A L I B R E FA M I LY
51011 7.6 mm 37.8 mm
44
19,800 A/h / 2.75 Hz
51900 9.0 mm 37.8 mm
 5 9 0 0 0 - C A L I B R E FA M I LY
51113 7.6 mm 37.8 mm
21,600 A/h / 3 Hz
51613 9.1 mm 37.8 mm
21,600 A/h / 3 Hz
21,600 A/h / 3 Hz
21,600 A/h / 3 Hz
51111 7.6 mm 37.8 mm
21,600 A/h / 3 Hz
98950 8.9 mm 37.8 mm 18,000 A/h / 2.5 Hz
52
28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
98900 4.7 mm 37.8 mm 28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
21
98800 6.1 mm 37.8 mm 18,000 A/h / 2.5 Hz
18
  9 8 0 0 0 - C A L I B R E FA M I LY
28
H
H
H
H
H
18
a)A/h = alternances à l’heure = beats per hourb)S = self-winding, H = hand-wound
 8 9 0 0 0 - C A L I B R E FA M I LY
80111 7.3 mm 30 mm
80110 7.3 mm 30 mm
28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
28
28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
H
S
98300 4.7 mm 37.8 mm 18,000 A/h / 2.5 Hz
18
89800 9.9 mm 37 mm
98295 4.7 mm 37.8 mm 18,000 A/h / 2.5 Hz
89365 7.5 mm 30 mm
89361 7.5 mm 30 mm
28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
28,800 A/h / 4 Hz
Special features
5101
X
Date
X
X
X
X
X
X
7 days
8 days
S
38
35
52
S
S
S
5032, 5026, 5029
Perpetual calendar, double moon phases
Perpetual calendar, classic moon phase
Tourbillon, retrograde date
5023
5044
5005
5009, 5019
5001
X
Chronograph, digital perpetual calendar
3761, 3791
3878, 3880
5445, 5454
68 h 68 h
68 h
X X
Minute repeater
Classic moon phase Tourbillon
5447
5449
5448
3254, 5454
7 days
7 days
7 days
7 days
7 days
Power reserve
44 h
44 h
X
X
3764, 3769, 3784, 3878, 3902
Stopwatch function with hours, minutes and seconds Stopwatch function with minutes and seconds
3236
3231, 3233, 5461
46 h
46 h
46 h 54 h
46 h
I W C C A L I B R E S
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T H E G R E A T L E G A C Y O F T H E I W C P O C K E T W A T C H E S
References
T E C H N O L O G Y
T E C H N O L O G Y
— 1 9 —