Among other topics, do not forget to comment upon embedded questions

Among other topics, do not forget to comment upon embedded questions

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Your main commentary should be focused on noun phrases expressing of totality. Additional topics may also be addressed. Weapon training was especially interesting. We were all given a 7.62 Self- whole kit including an old rifle they kept especially for swimming with. It was Loading Rifle, which was to be our personal weapon. After some initial very hard to keep afloat with all this kit on, let alone swim. training to learn the workings of the weapon, it was off to the range to sight After a few weeks’ training, we were taken to the gym to play games against a it in. The first thing to do was to get the SLR set up for my own eyesight. At squad that was further into their training than we were. We played a variety of 5 a range of 25 yards, we were told to load five rounds and fire at the centre of 40 games, including volleyball, football and some chase and contact games. We a 'Figure Eleven, Charging Man target.' After the five rounds were fired, Cpl lost them all. We didn't even get near to winning any of them. It was a lesson Bouchard proved the SLR empty, the weapons training instructor. Proving that was very important. We had a lecture afterward, telling us that we were means checking that a weapon is empty. When all weapons had been not expected to win anything. The extra training that the more advanced squad proved, we were sent to stand by our targets, for evaluation. The purpose of had, had increased their fitness and their confidence to such a degree, ...

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Your main commentary should be focused on noun phrases expressing of totality. Additional topics may also be addressed.
Weapon training was especially interesting. We were all given a 7.62 Self-
Loading Rifle, which was to be our personal weapon. After some initial
training to learn the workings of the weapon, it was off to the range to sight
it in. The first thing to do was to get the SLR set up for my own eyesight. At
a range of 25 yards, we were told to load five rounds and fire at the centre of
a 'Figure Eleven, Charging Man target.' After the five rounds were fired, Cpl
Bouchard proved the SLR empty, the weapons training instructor. Proving
means checking that a weapon is empty. When all weapons had been
proved, we were sent to stand by our targets, for evaluation. The purpose of
this exercise was to see where the group was printing so that Cpl Bouchard
could adjust the sights to hit the centre of the target. The hope was that all
recruits would be able to hit the target sufficiently well to make an
assessment. This didn't prove to be the case. As I walked past some of the
targets to get to mine, I couldn't help laughing. Some had hardly hit the
target at all. Those who had were all over the place. The corporal was
moving up the line cursing and swearing at each recruit in turn. When he got
to me I was still sniggering. [. . .]
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He said, 'that's pretty good, but where's the fifth shot.'
I said, 'It went through one of the other holes corporal.'
'Show me.' He said.
I showed him the very slight clip on the side of one of the holes. He just
said, 'well done'.
We had to learn to swim for great distances carrying large amounts of
equipment. Like everything else, it was to be a gradual build up of
proficiency. First time at the pool, the instructor said, good swimmers to one
end and poor swimmers to the other end. I thought that if I went with the
poor swimmers it would give me time to build up my stamina.
He shouted, 'everybody in the pool.'
Some jumped in, some lowered themselves in and some dived in. I dived in
and after a couple of strokes, I came up on the other side of the pool. The
instructor had seen it and shouted, 'YOU! Get up the other end.' So I was in
the experienced class after all. First of all we swam round and round the pool
for increasing lengths of time. Then we started swimming while wearing
more and more kit. Starting with combat jacket and trousers, then adding
boots, then packs, then stones in the pack to simulate a full kit, then the
whole kit including an old rifle they kept especially for swimming with. It was
very hard to keep afloat with all this kit on, let alone swim.
After a few weeks’ training, we were taken to the gym to play games against a
squad that was further into their training than we were. We played a variety of
games, including volleyball, football and some chase and contact games. We
lost them all. We didn't even get near to winning any of them. It was a lesson
that was very important. We had a lecture afterward, telling us that we were
not expected to win anything. The extra training that the more advanced squad
had, had increased their fitness and their confidence to such a degree, that we
had never stood a chance. It would soon be our turn to play these games
against a squad earlier in it's training than us and we would be expected to
annihilate them, as we had been annihilated. [. . .]
After a shower, Alfie and I went to the galley for dinner. Marine barracks are
classed as ships, so nautical terms are used. [. . .]
The Reverend G P Thornley was the Navy Vicar for the Deal barracks. Geoff
Thornley and I became friends very quickly. We just hit it off together. I was
soon reading the lesson during the church services on Sundays. I had done it
many times before at school. Although I have never been a religious person, it
didn't seem to matter to Geoff. He never came on with a holy attitude, though
there was never any doubt that he was a holy man. Our friendship has endured
for nearly thirty years, although we rarely see each other these days, but we
still keep in touch.
The post was handed out every morning at first assembly. We were ordered
to form up as a squad, outside the barracks. Sergeant Watkins called out each
name in turn, then handed any post to the persons concerned. I seemed to have
something almost every day, mainly from girlfriends. One day he called my
name, while waving a beautifully pink coloured envelope in the air. He said to
everyone, while holding my letter to his nose. 'Look at this, a pink scented
letter from America, what ever next.'
Cliff B
ALLINGER
(UK),
A Gloucester Boy
, 1999